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Avenir LNG Limited Takes Delivery of Avenir Advantage

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Avenir Advantage

Avenir LNG
Avenir LNG
Avenir LNG

Avenir Advantage

Avenir LNG
Avenir LNG
Avenir LNG

London, October 14, 2020 – Avenir LNG Limited (NOTC:AVENIR) today announced that its subsidiary Avenir (L) Pte. Ltd. has taken delivery of its first dual purpose liquefied natural gas bunkering and supply vessel (LBV) Avenir Advantage from Keppel Offshore & Marine, at the Nantong Shipyard, Jiangsu Province, China.

Following her maiden voyage, Avenir Advantage will commence a three-year charter to Petronas LNG Sdn Bhd in Malaysia; becoming the first dedicated LBV in South East Asia. She will supply LNG to fuel ships operating in the region and deliver LNG directly to Petronas small-scale customers.

Milorad Doljanin, CEO Avenir LNG Limited, commented: “With the delivery of the Avenir Advantage, we move one step closer to delivering our shareholders’ vision of creating a small-scale LNG supply and marketing portfolio.”

“The flexible design of our vessels allows us to support the development of the LNG bunker fuel market whilst adding to the global small-scale supply fleet; thereby supporting our strategic objective of supplying natural gas to otherwise inaccessible areas.”

Avenir LNG is currently building a fleet of six LBVs of 7,500cbm and 20,000cbm capacity and the HIGAS LNG import facility (10,800 cbm) in Sardinia Italy. Avenir Advantage is the first of two ships ordered from Keppel Nantong Shipyard. Each vessel has a cargo capacity of 7,500 cbm across two Type C tanks.

About Avenir LNG Limited: Avenir LNG supplies small-scale LNG to off-grid industry, power generation and transport fuel sectors as well as providing infrastructure to support the development of LNG as a marine fuel.

Leveraging the expertise of its’ shareholders, Avenir LNG has quickly become one of the leading providers of small-scale LNG solutions; working with local partners and end users to develop the infrastructure necessary to unlock new

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Cowboys’ Andy Dalton can take advantage after Dak Prescott injury

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Seven months ago, Andy Dalton was the perennial bridesmaid.

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers had interest, but only if their Tom Brady pitch fell through. The Indianapolis Colts called, but a deal was back-burnered in favor of Philip Rivers. And just when the Cincinnati Bengals thought Chicago was ready to consummate a deal, the Bears took a left turn for Nick Foles.

This is how Dalton became a Dallas Cowboy. He was a near-miss starting option for a handful of other teams, then got released and was left to choose between backup options that included Dallas, the New York Jets and Jacksonville Jaguars.

Now a horrible turn of fate has granted him a chance to reclaim a reputation as a starter, while rebooting a career that has never gotten the respect it probably deserves.

This is why Cowboys owner Jerry Jones signed Dalton in May, because Jones has been through the Brandon Weeden, Kyle Orton and Matt Cassel experience. And even though Dak Prescott didn’t miss a single game in the previous four seasons, the Cowboys owner learned the hard way that guys like Troy Aikman and Tony Romo sometimes didn’t walk through that door. The resulting backup slump (aside from, say, the Jon Kitna experience) taught a valuable lesson: A quality starter on the second rung of the quarterback depth chart can be the difference between fighting through the remainder of a season or simply killing time before the NFL draft.

Cowboys quarterback Andy Dalton, pictured at training camp in August with Dak Prescott, was a late free-agent signing for Dallas. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

That’s what Jones is banking on with Dalton. That this is a guy who can help salvage a season that has gone off the rails with injuries.

He’s hoping this is the same Dalton who

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Miami QB D’Eriq King has taken full advantage of transfer rules

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He committed to one school (TCU) way back in 2015, then fashionably de-committed.

He committed to another school (Houston) as it fashionably touted its 2016 recruiting class.

He saw the head coach (Tom Herman) leave after one season, which was pretty fashionable.

He (King) proved fashionably versatile in a sport (among other sports) becoming more position-less.

He played two years for another coach (Major Applewhite), who got fired with fashionable haste.

Come late September 2019, he (King) ventured to the fashion vanguard, accepting his third coach’s advice to follow a new redshirt rule.

Come January 2020, he entered the fashionable transfer portal, announcing it fashionably by tweet during the national championship game.

In winter 2020, he transferred, the foremost fashion.

“Just playing with these guys for the first few weeks and getting a bye week, I think I have a better feel for what guys are good at,” he said this week in Miami’s media sessions. The quotation told of a quick-study necessity that, too, is fashionable.

So start with the transfer and work back.

Transfers grip the game as never before, their stigmas deceased and their pathways ever less cluttered. In the 2019-20 College Football Playoff, three of the four starting quarterbacks had transferred from other major programs, leaving 2021 NFL No. 1 pick Trevor Lawrence as the only one of the four as a one-school throwback.

When LSU quarterback Joe Burrow stood in New York in December 2019 to accept the Heisman Trophy, that made it three straight Heisman winners who had transferred from one FBS program to another. Among the 82 Heisman winners before that, only two had transferred from another major school, Cam Newton (2010) and Felix “Doc” Blanchard (1945), the latter switching from North Carolina to Army after he signed up for the Army during

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With near-empty stands, college football’s home-field advantage on pace to be worst in 15 years

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When Mike Leach looked for fans Saturday,  he saw cardboard. Leave it to The Pirate to break down what it’s like to play college football in empty or near-empty stadiums in 2020.

“The vibe to me that’s funny is the cut-out people,” Leach told CBS Sports after Saturday’s 44-34 upset at LSU. “Isn’t that ‘Twilight Zone’ and ‘Outer Limits’ stuff?”

Not quite science fiction, though somewhat dystopian cardboard images of fans and COVID-19 diminished crowds have almost become routine. At LSU last week, fans were able to purchase a cut out of themselves to be placed in the stands where 82,000 empty seats looked on. The cost? $50.

They mixed nicely with a reduced crowd of 21,124 who watched Mississippi State’s upset at Tiger Stadium (total capacity: 102,321). They also held the attention of the Bulldogs coach, who is known sometimes for his lack of focus.

“I would try to find cut-outs in the crowd that looked really good or were interesting except that they didn’t move,” Leach said. “They were frozen.”

That’s a sideways glimpse of what it will be like to play this season amid COVID-19 restrictions (capacity varies depending on local health guidelines). The atmosphere at games has certainly been diminished. Bands may or may not allowed. When first the Big Ten and then the Pac-12 return later this fall, they will do so without fans.

“It’s not ideal,” West Virginia coach Neal Brown said. “It’s just awkward. It’s just different.”

Home-field advantage has been altered — at least reduced — for sure in 2020. Four weeks into the season, home teams are winning only 59.5% of their games (47-32). If that number holds, it would mark the worst winning percentage by home teams since 2005 (59.3%).

Ironically, the year following that (2004) marked the best home