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Amy Coney Barrett’s fellow faculty members at the University of Notre Dame called on her to delay her nomination until after the election

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Joanna Bator looking at the camera: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 13, 2020 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum/Getty Images


© Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on October 13, 2020 in Washington, DC. Samuel Corum/Getty Images

  • A group of faculty members at the University of Notre have called on Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, to for “halt” her nomination till after the November election. 
  • Barrett’s co-workers said while her confirmation is assured, it comes at a polarized time in the country. 
  • Confirmation hearings began this week in the Senate. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Faculty members at the University of Notre Dame called on judge Amy Coney Barrett, Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, to “halt” her nomination till after the November election, in an open letter. 

“We congratulate you on your nomination to the United States Supreme Court. An appointment to the Court is the crowning achievement of a legal career and speaks to the commitments you have made throughout your life. And while we are not pundits, from what we read your confirmation is all but assured,” the letter read.

“That is why it is vital that you issue a public statement calling for a halt to your nomination process until after the November presidential election,” the letter continued.

Barrett was nominated by Trump to fill the seat of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who died last month. 

After Ginsburg’s death, Congressional Democrats denounced the idea of nominating and confirming a new justice until after the November elections, arguing that the seat should remain empty until a new president is elected.

Following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in February 2016, Senate Republicans refused to hold hearings for a nominee chosen

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Yandy Smith-Harris discusses activism, the election and her career

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Yandy Smith-Harris discusses using her platform to empower social justice causes and more in conversation with Marc Lamont Hill.

Love and Hip Hop Star Yandy Smith-Harris sat down with theGrio host Marc Lamont Hill to discuss entrepreneurship and activism and using her platform to demand justice for Breonna Taylor.

Read More: Yandy Smith-Harris talks voting, activism on Students for Biden’s ‘On The Yard’ series

As summer protests continued, the popular reality TV star made news for not only protesting but going to jail while in the act. Alongside Real Housewives Of Atlanta star Porsha Williams and other demonstrators, Smith-Harris was arrested this summer for marching in Lousiville, Kentucky. As theGrio reported, Smith was horrified by the terrible conditions she and protesters endured while in custody.

“The bathroom is just completely disgusting, like feces on the toilet. Feces on the floor. You would think there was a puddle of water, but it was urine,” she said after being released.

During the Instagram Live conversation with Hill, the 40-year-old said the decision to not charge officers in Taylor’s violent death was “an egregious miscarriage of justice.” She also said Taylor’s mom stood with them during every protest.

It was disgraceful, to say the least, to be a Black woman and to realize that they felt like the wall was more important than her life,” Smith-Harris said. “It was the worst news that we could have heard. We put our bodies on the line. Every time we were out there protesting, every time we got locked up, her mom was there waiting for us. Her mom was on the front lines with us.”

Although Smith has made recent headlines connected to her fight for justice for Breonna Taylor, the entrepreneur detailed her beginnings with activism and protesting and finding purpose

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What’s at Stake for Education in the 2020 Election

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Photo credit: Hanna Varady/Getty
Photo credit: Hanna Varady/Getty

From Marie Claire

In regard to education policy in the November 2020 election, from student loan policy and COVID-19 education rules to public versus for-profit schools, much of it comes down to one woman: Betsy DeVos. President Trump’s Secretary of Education, a woman who has been described as “the most unpopular person in our government,” is behind what some pundits describe as the longest-lasting and most seismic legacies of the current administration. In particular, critics have taken aim at DeVos’ policies that work towards defunding and delegitimizing public education.

It’s likely that under another term of President Trump and DeVos, public schools will continue to suffer and lose resources; meanwhile, private, religious, and for-profit institutions are likely to be deregulated and given tools to flourish. Here, some of the most critical issues in regard to education policy, and where the Democratic and Republican candidates stand on each.

Education and COVID-19

Trump and DeVos: Trump threatened to defund schools that do not open despite COVID-19 concerns—a threat that DeVos supported—in a move that has been called “dangerous” and is at odds with CDC recommendations. Experts said he has no legal authority to withhold the funds. DeVos, meanwhile, is using the $2 trillion coronavirus stabilization law to funnel money designed for public school to private and religious schools, and was accused of “exploiting Congressional relief efforts.”

Harris and Biden: As for Harris and Biden’s COVID-19 plan as it relates to schools, the plan is to allow the CDC to provide national-level guidance about the dangers of COVID-19 spread to young people; to utilize funds to account for shortfalls in budget that impact teachers; and to use a “dial” analogy to make critical decisions about when to close or open schools and how to re-open them safely based on

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Six candidates vying for three seats on the Muskegon Board of Education in the Nov. 3 election

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MUSKEGON, MI – Six candidates are vying for three open seats on the Muskegon Board of Education in the Nov. 3 general election.

Muskegon Public Schools is one of the largest districts in the county with 3,514 registered students this fall.

School board trustees serve six-year terms and are tasked with a variety of jobs including, approving an annual budget, hire and evaluate the superintendent, and adopting policies that give the district administration direction to set priorities and achieve its goals.

Three of the candidates – Zachary Anderson, Billie Bruce and Louis Churchwell – are incumbents seeking reelection.

The other three candidate are new challengers – Kwame Kamau James, Nicholas Sima and Jonathan Witmer.

Here is some background information provided by each of the candidates:

  • Anderson, 27, attended Grand Valley State University (GVSU) and now works as a consultant. He has served on the Muskegon school board for the past six years and has pushed for transparency and accountability from the administration, he said.
  • Bruce, 77, is a Muskegon Public Schools graduate and earned her degrees from Muskegon Community College and GVSU. She has served as secretary on the Muskegon school board for six years. She is a pediatric Registered Nurse and earned a certificate for Elementary Drug Free School Zones from Concordia University.
  • Churchwell, 62, is a clinician and Group Coordinator with HealthWest Muskegon. He graduated from Muskegon Public Schools in 1977 and currently serves as the school board’s Vice President. He studied at Grand Canyon University and earned two master’s degrees: a Masters of Science in Professional Counseling, and a Masters in the field of Substance Abuse/Addictions. He is a former CEO of West Michigan Therapy, Inc. and founder of Transitional Living Center in Muskegon Heights.
  • James, 45, is self-employed and earned his associate’s degree from Muskegon Community

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Nearly 1 in 3 Oregon students learning in-person attend private schools, election 2020 preview: The week in education

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An Oregonian/OregonLive analysis of state education data found that 30% of students who attended in-person classes the week of Sept. 28-Oct. 2 are enrolled in private schools.

All told, 550 Oregon schools offered some form of in-person instruction that week, teaching some 46,000 students. One hundred and seventy of those schools are private and taught 13,000 students in-person, state Department of Education figures show.

That means 6% of the state’s 560,000 K-12 students visited a classroom last week. The share of private students in the overall population is about 2%.

In order for school districts to allow in-person instruction, the county they’re in must meet specific coronavirus set by the state. If a district or school draws 10% or more of its workforce or enrollment from more than one county, both must meet the metrics in order for the district to open its classrooms.

That’s the case in Portland Public Schools, where district officials this week say their reopening fortunes are tied to coronavirus metrics in Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties. Officials there don’t expect students to see the inside of a classroom until late January at the earliest.

Here are some of the other major education stories from this week:

Education stories from the Portland area:

Most Portland voters will see a pair of education-related tax measures on the ballot next month, one of them a $1.2 billion campaign from the state’s largest district to update a high school in a historically black neighborhood and another to fund free preschool for all Multnomah County children ages 3 and 4.

The Portland Public Schools measure would pay for extensive renovations to Jefferson High School, as well as accessibility throughout the district and investments in curriculum and technology. You can read the full details of the measure here.

The preschool measure,

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