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In Paris, Kenin eyes 2nd Slam of year, Swiatek 1st of career

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A little more than four years ago in Paris, Iga Swiatek beat Sofia Kenin 6-4, 7-5 in the third round of the French Open junior event.



Sofia Kenin of the U.S. clenches her fist after scoring a point against Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)


© Provided by Associated Press
Sofia Kenin of the U.S. clenches her fist after scoring a point against Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

“I remember I lost. I don’t remember how I played,” Kenin said when asked about the only encounter between the two. “But definitely I can say I was not as comfortable on clay as I am now, as I started to feel last year. … Of course, we’re both different players now.”

Certainly are.

And the stakes in their second matchup at Roland Garros are considerably different from that 2016 meeting, too: Kenin, a 21-year-old from Florida, and Swiatek, a 19-year-old from Poland, will face each other Saturday in the French Open women’s final.

Swiatek (pronounced shvee-ON’-tek) is No. 54, making her the lowest-ranked woman to get this far at the tournament since the WTA computer rankings began in 1975. She seeks her first Grand Slam title; in six previous appearances, her best showing was the fourth round.



Poland's Iga Swiatek clenches her fist after scoring a point against Argentina's Nadia Podoroska in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)


© Provided by Associated Press
Poland’s Iga Swiatek clenches her fist after scoring a point against Argentina’s Nadia Podoroska in the semifinal match of the French Open tennis tournament at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

“I mean, I have to figure out what she does. She’s had a great two weeks here. She’s had some great results, playing some really good tennis,” said Kenin, who eliminated two-time Wimbledon winner Petra Kvitova in the semifinals. “I know that I’m

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UK Eyes Innovative Launch Technology To Fuel Its Space Ambitions

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KEY POINTS

  • The U.K. government invested $117,000 in the tech
  • Autophage rockets may be used for launching small satellites
  • The U.K. aims to secure 10% of the space industry by 2030

The U.K. government is investing in rockets that “eat themselves” up on the way to orbit as it scrambles to gain market share in the global space industry.

The ‘autophage’ rocket engine, developed by researchers from Ukraine and Glasgow University, Scotland, has received funding worth 90,000 pounds, or $117,000, from the Ministry of Defense’s innovation head-hunter Defense & Security Accelerator (DASA).

Autophage rockets, simply put, help to lift satellites into space by burning their own body as fuel. This tech produces enough energy to reach orbit in a smaller launch vehicle. It may help the U.K. claim a part of the global $2.8-billion small-satellite launch market, which at present is dominated by American companies Rocket Lab and SpaceX.

“The specific payloads we are targeting include the small satellites. Presently, it takes a long time to launch these because they need to be grouped for a flight on a larger rocket, which is usually launched from the U.S. or Kazakhstan. The process can take years,” Patrick Harkness, of James Watt School of Engineering, said.

The simplest solution that comes to mind for this problem is to use smaller rockets, but that is difficult because if you scale down a rocket’s size, it also reduces the amount of propellant it can carry. The rocket may not be able to reach orbit.

Autophage rockets burn the propellant and the tanks containing them, which saves excess mass and the vehicle can be miniaturized successfully.

“The body of a hybrid autophage rocket will be a tube of solid fuel, containing liquid oxidizer, which is the propellant. The entire assembly will be consumed from the

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VCU eyes requiring racism course for all students

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RICHMOND, Va. – Virginia Commonwealth University is considering whether to make courses on racism a requirement for its students.

Constance Relihan, dean of VCU’s University College, told the Richmond Times-Dispatch that many other colleges are having the same discussion as protests over racial injustice sweep across the U.S.

“We’re at a good moment to see that this is something we really need to address,” Relihan said.

VCU offers a major in African American studies and has classes in other departments that address the history and implications of racism. But they aren’t part of the university’s required curriculum.

VCU has been revising its general education requirements over the past two years. Relihan said she hopes a decision on whether to require racism classes will be made by the end of the current semester.

“If we’re going to address this issue, we want to do it well, and we want to do it deeply,” Relihan said.

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