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Athletes face emotional blow as pandemic uproots college sports

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Early mornings, late nights, countless hours of training. And now, perhaps nothing to show for it.

Where student-athletes are left after programs cut or postponed

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That’s a glimpse at the uncertainty for college athletes across the country who have had seasons derailed. In some cases, their programs have even been cut altogether as schools react to the health risks and financial ripples of COVID-19.

The pandemic has shaken the college sports scene to its core, dealing an emotional blow to athletes as they’re forced to stay on their toes about the status of their careers.

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Some college football conferences have made a loud return to action, but many athletes in lower revenue sports – the runners, swimmers, golfers, and soccer players – are still waiting to take the field or hear if they’ll be able to compete again.

Many athletic conferences have pushed non-football fall sports to the spring. But with CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield saying a vaccine won’t be widely available until mid-2021, even that timeframe could make it difficult to restart sports en masse while keeping everyone safe.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Along with the men's and women's swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men's and women's golf, and men's lightweight rowing.


© Provided by Connor LaMastra
Along with the men’s and women’s swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men’s and women’s golf, and men’s lightweight rowing.

College football and COVID-19: A big, disjointed experiment exposes scientific, political gaps

Between the decisions made by schools, conferences, local and state officials or the CDC itself, the fates of so many athletic careers rest in the hands of higher powers.

Some students have already been dealt disappointing results.

‘A total slap in the face’

Wrestlers at Old Dominion, swimmers at UConn and baseball players at Boise State are all in the same boat. So are

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Work Or Online Learning? Homeless Families Face An Impossible Choice : NPR

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Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR


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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

The closure of school buildings in response to the coronavirus has been disruptive and inconvenient for many families, but for those living in homeless shelters or hotel rooms — including roughly 1.5 million school-aged children — the shuttering of classrooms and cafeterias has been disastrous.

For Rachel, a 17-year-old sharing a hotel room in Cincinnati with her mother, the disaster has been academic. Her school gave her a laptop, but “hotel Wi-Fi is the worst,” she says. “Every three seconds [my teacher is] like, ‘Rachel, you’re glitching. Rachel, you’re not moving.'”

For Vanessa Shefer, the disaster has made her feel “defeated.” Since May, when the family home burned, she and her four children have stayed in a hotel, a campground and recently left rural New Hampshire to stay with extended family in St. Johnsbury, Vt. Her kids ask, “When are we going to have a home?” But Shefer says she can’t afford a “home” without a good-paying job, and she can’t get a job while her kids need help with school.

For this story, NPR spoke with students, parents, caregivers, shelter managers and school leaders across the country about what it means, in this moment, to be homeless and schoolless.

Vanessa Shefer (right) walks with her family along the Passumpsic River in St. Johnsbury, Vt.

Ian

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College basketball schedule 2020-21: Iowa to face Gonzaga in potential top-five showdown in South Dakota

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College basketball continues to load up on elite, must-see games for its upcoming season.


The latest late-offseason upgrade features two Final Four contenders — Gonzaga playing Iowa — in a game to be played on Dec. 19 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, sources told CBS Sports. The Sanford Pentagon (the same site hosting the tournament field formerly labeled the 2020 Battle 4 Atlantis) will be witness to the fourth meeting ever between the Bulldogs and Hawkeyes. 


Gonzaga is ranked No. 1 in CBS Sports’ Top 25 And 1 preseason rankings. The Hawkeyes are No. 5.


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The game is a goodie, and not just because Gonzaga could be the best team in college basketball. This tilt would also will feature the lock-of-locks preseason pick for national player of the year, Iowa center Luka Garza. The senior big man opted to return to college basketball after being a consensus First Team All-America/Big Ten Player of the Year. He averaged 23.9 points, 8.9 rebounds and 1.8 blocks a season ago; Iowa was well on its way to the 2020 NCAA Tournament, thanks in large part to Garza’s play.


Garza won’t be the only potential preseason All-American selection in this game. Gonzaga guard Corey Kispert leads maybe the most well-rounded starting five in the sport. The Zags are loaded yet again and have championship aspirations. 


Gonzaga was able to fill this opening on its slate because, just as it did with securing Baylor for a Dec. 5 game in Indianapolis, Iowa was both a desirable, high-quality opponent and a team that

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Salem State University students to face discipline for violating public health guidelines with large gathering

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Several Salem State University students will face discipline for attending off-campus gatherings in violation of public health guidelines, authorities said.

Salem Mayor Kim Driscoll and Salem State University President John Keenan released a joint statement that said the two incidents occurred Friday night.

“In addition to violating rules regarding large gatherings, there was also conduct involved in both incidents that led to arrests,” the statement said. “In each case, the Salem Police Department and City officials are working closely with Salem State Police and university officials to identify as many responsible parties as possible and ensure they face the appropriate consequences, both on- and off-campus.”

Driscoll and Keenan said in the first incident, police broke up a gathering of over 50 people at an apartment on Becket Street and arrested one individual, who is not a Salem State student, on charges of disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. The property owner also is going to be cited by Salem police for keeping a disorderly house and those who attended the gathering will be issued citations from Salem public health officials, the statement said.

“Any current Salem State students who are identified as having attended the gathering will also face additional disciplinary consequences from the university,” the statement said. “All individuals who attended this gathering, whether identified or not, are strongly encouraged to get a free COVID-19 test, either through SSU if they are a university student or through the City’s free “Stop the Spread” testing at Salem High School.”

Driscoll and Keenan said the second incident involved vandalism to the playground equipment at Pickman Park. A Salem State student was arrested and charged with burning personal property, vandalism, and destruction of property over $1,200. “The investigation and identification of other people present, as well as their involvement, is ongoing,” the statement