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Princeton Agrees To Nearly $1M In Back Pay To Female Professors : NPR

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Blair Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The university has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female full professors, but did not admit liability in the Labor Department’s investigation.

John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images


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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Blair Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The university has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female full professors, but did not admit liability in the Labor Department’s investigation.

John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

One of the nation’s most prestigious universities has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female professors following allegations of pay discrimination.

The Ivy League university will pay $925,000 in back pay and at least $250,000 in future wages, as part of an agreement announced by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The agreement resolves pay disparities uncovered by a multi-year investigation that affected more than 100 female full professors, the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs said.

The federal government’s investigation found between 2012 and 2014, pay disparities at the university “existed for 106 female employees in the full professor position,” the Labor Department said.

If confirmed, those findings would appear to violate federal equal opportunity laws.

The New Jersey-based university entered what is known as an “early resolution conciliation agreement.” A university spokesperson said in an e-mailed statement to NPR that it accepted the agreement to forgo what would likely be a costly and drawn out litigation process.

Princeton did not admit any liability in the investigation, Ben Chang, a spokesperson from Princeton, said in an emailed statement. He said that university officials did an internal analysis during the two year period the Labor Department says it was in violation, but found “no meaningful pay disparities based

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Why The Traits Of Female Leadership Are Better Geared For The Global Pandemic

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As countries anticipate the second wave of Covid-19, recently published research provides evidence to show that countries with female leaders performed better on two significant counts; a lower number of positive Covid-19 cases and a lower number of Covid-19 related deaths. The authors of the research from the Universities of Reading and Liverpool, compared data using 194 countries dataset. Their data analysis included controls for other factors, such as GDP per capita, the population, the size of the urban population, and the proportion of elderly adults. Their findings demonstrated that Covid-19 related outcomes are systematically better in countries led by women.

Areas of differentiation, such as health expenditure, will impact results to Covid-19. Countries with a weaker health infrastructure are more likely to shut down quickly in a defensive measure, demonstrated by several developing countries, including India and South Africa. However, the decision to shut down countries quickly was not limited to regions with weaker health infrastructure but included countries like Germany and Taiwan, both led by women. Other factors, including countries more open to international travel, also demonstrated better performance. While these countries experienced a similar number of Covid-19 cases to other nations open to international travel, the subsequent deaths in countries with female leaders were noticeably lower.

The results

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This Bird Is Both Male and Female

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gynandromorphic rose breasted grosbeak

Carnegie Museum of Natural History / Annie Lindsay

  • Scientists have discovered a gynandromorphic (two-sexed) bird in a Pennsylvania nature reserve.
  • The bird displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring, leaving researchers to label it a “unicorn.”
  • The bird is likely a product of a genetic anomaly, but it’s perfectly healthy.

    Every once in a while, a genetic anomaly will occur in the animal world that blows scientists’ minds. Take, for example, the exotic bird in the image above. It’s “gynandromorphic,” which means a specimen containing both female and male characteristics that can sometimes be seen in physical traits on the body.

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    Meet the rose-breasted grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus), which displays an even split down the middle between male and female feather coloring. The bird’s right side shows red plumage (male), while and its left shows golden yellow feathers (female), according to scientists from the Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Pennsylvania, who recently discovered it.

    The scientists were “very excited to see such a rarity up close, and are riding the high of this once-in-a-lifetime experience,” they said in a press release. Annie Lindsay, bird banding program manager at Powdermill, said one researcher referred to the experience as “seeing a unicorn,” while another described the discovery as an adrenaline rush, because it was “so remarkable.”


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    Here’s why: Powdermill has been banding and studying several different species since 1962—approximately 13,000 birds annually—and out of the several hundred thousand birds ornithologists have seen at the site, just fewer than 10 have been gynandromorphs like the rose-breasted grosbeak. The last time Powdermill saw a gynandromorph was in 2005, when the team found a