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Journalism student sues ASU, citing free speech rights

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ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in downtown Phoenix. (Photo: The Republic)

An Arizona State University journalism student is suing the school after she says she was removed from leading the student-run radio station over a controversial tweet.

The lawsuit claims that the university violated Rae’Lee Klein’s First Amendment rights to free expression by refusing to allow her to continue as station manager of Blaze Radio because of her tweet.

The university, in a statement to The Arizona Republic on Tuesday, refuted that claim, saying, “Klein’s conduct in the aftermath of the tweet — rather than the tweet itself — meant that she was no longer able to perform the job for which she was hired.”

But Klein said she was first scolded about her tweet and later scolded for her media appearances and conversations with elected officials as her situation gained attention. 

“They were first upset by my free speech and now they’re upset that I’ve become this cause célèbre for free speech, so it’s just disappointing to see them keep taking the same stance and not want to work or correct the situation,” Klein told The Republic. 

Jack Wilenchik, Klein’s attorney, filed the complaint in U.S. District Court on Monday against ASU, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Kristin Gilger, Cronkite interim dean.

Klein faced swift backlash from within and outside her radio station after a tweet she posted in the aftermath of police shooting Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Aug. 23. Klein shared a New York Post article with graphic details from a police report accusing Blake of sexual assault.

The Aug. 29 tweet, deleted later, was captioned, “Always more to the story, folks. Please read this article to get the background of Jacob Blake’s warrant. You’ll be

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Career Chicago Blackhawks goalie Corey Crawford now NHL free agent

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The Chicago Blackhawks are not bringing back goalie Corey Crawford, GM Stan Bowman said Thursday.

“I had a conversation with Corey earlier today,” Bowman said. “And it was an emotional talk.”

The 35-year-old Crawford is an unrestricted free agent. Crawford, who has spent his entire career in Chicago since being drafted in the second round in 2003, has been the Blackhawks’ starting goaltender since 2010-11, and helped the franchise to two Stanley Cups, in 2013 and 2015.

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Free agency begins Friday, and Crawford joins a crowded veteran goalie market, which includes Cory Schneider, Braden Holtby, Henrik Lundqvist, Anton Khudobin, Jacob Markstrom, Thomas Greiss, Cam Talbot, Mike Smith, Craig Anderson and Jimmy Howard. The Vegas Golden Knights are also trying to shop Marc-Andre Fleury after signing Robin Lehner — who began last season in Chicago — to a five-year, $25 million deal.

Sources told ESPN that the Blackhawks had been negotiating with Crawford on a new deal but were asking him to take a significant pay cut from $5 million on his last contract. Sources say the Blackhawks were offering about $3.5 million to Crawford for a one-year deal, although talks fell apart.

“The message to Corey and to everyone else today is that we’ve decided we have some young goaltenders here in Chicago we believe in,” Bowman said. “Much like Corey needed that opportunity when he came up after the 2010 season, we have a couple young goalies in [Kevin] Lankinen and [Collin] Delia who we haven’t given a real opportunity to. With where we’re headed, the NHL is relying more and more on young players. We’re going to embrace that going forward.”

The Blackhawks have 26-year-old Delia and Lankinen, 25, signed through the next two seasons. Chicago did not extend a qualifying offer to Malcolm Subban, 26,

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Kent State University to test 450 random students per week for coronavirus, partner with CVS on expanded free testing

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CLEVELAND, Ohio — Kent State University will ask 450 random students to be tested for coronavirus each week, and partner with CVS on free testing for symptomatic and asymptomatic students.



logo: A water tower on the campus of Kent State University dons the schools logo. The university is expanding free testing through a partnership with CVS.


© John Kuntz / The Plain Dealer/cleveland.com/TNS
A water tower on the campus of Kent State University dons the schools logo. The university is expanding free testing through a partnership with CVS.

The university’s Kent campus reported 40 new cases for the week of Sept. 27, according to the most recent numbers from an online dashboard, with 165 total cases since Sept. 7. More than 40 students were recently asked to quarantine because of cases found in two residence halls.

Quarantining does not mean that the students were diagnosed with coronavirus, but rather that students may have been exposed. The students are quarantining in separate sections of residence halls.

Cases found at the university contributed to Portage County moving into the “red” category on the state’s coronavirus risk forecast system, or the second-highest level on Sept. 17. KSU and the county both asked students to avoid parties and social gatherings to help halt the spread.

Portage dropped back to Level 2, or “orange,” on Sept. 24, but KSU is continuing to ask students to follow guidelines and keeping enhanced safety precautions in place, like restricting residence hall visitors and keeping dining halls take-out only.

Free testing through CVS for faculty, students and staff begins Oct. 12. Free testing is also available through the campus health center.

The random sampling of students is in line with state guidance which recommended universities set up a system for testing asymptomatic students, to gather more information about the virus’s presence on campus.

“It is important to understand that the more testing that takes place, the more cases of COVID-19 we will discover,” a

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The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online

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The Quantum Prisoner, a free scientific and technological video game is now available online
Credit: CEA

Science, logic, and technology are your best allies in The Quantum Prisoner, a completely free browser-based point-and-click adventure that is today playable in English on PC, Mac and mobile devices and tablets. Featuring 10-12 hours of gameplay, The Quantum Prisoner takes you on a journey around the globe to find out what happened to the physician Artus Cropp, who mysteriously disappeared back in the 1960s. Playing as Zoe, curious and resourceful young woman, you must solve more than 30 technology, science and engineering-based puzzles from operating particle accelerators and fuel cells to robots and more. You will escape perilous situations, progress through your investigation and make a discovery that will change the world!


“As a public science research organization, the CEA aims to open up the exciting world of science to the next generation of budding young brilliant minds and so made The Quantum Prisoner into a completely free game to lower the entry barrier for a fun learning experience,” said Roland Lehoucq, astrophysicist at the CEA and scientific advisor of The Quantum Prisoner. “We’ve designed the game to be accessible even if you don’t know anything about science—you learn as you play along, in line with the scientific approach. Informative videos, facts and assistance from the CEA researchers are all at your disposal as you play through increasingly challenging puzzles and learn about environmental and life sciences, physics, chemistry and maybe even a bit of quantum physics along the way!”

The Quantum Prisoner is a browser-based game created by the CEA with the sole purpose of making science fun and more accessible. The game is completely free with no registration required (unless you want to share your game between several devices), no ads, and can be played on any modern browser without the need of downloading a

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My Reflection Matters supports Connecticut home-schoolers in raising ‘free people’ outside the system

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Many parents are homeschooling their children due to the pandemic, but Chemay Morales-James beat them to it. She has been home-schooling for years, not due to coronavirus, but due to another seemingly incurable pandemic: racism. And she’s not alone.



a man sitting on top of a wooden fence: Chemay Morales-James points to a fish approaching her son, Judah James', 8, while Holly Dixon holds her son, Isaiah, 1, to look into the pond as the My Reflection Matters Village meets for a day of fishing and hiking at Southford Falls State Park Sept. 30. My Reflection Matters Village is a co-op of Connecticut parents of children of color who are home-schooling their children, using materials and processes that are more affirming to their children.


© Kassi Jackson/Kassi Jackson/Hartford Courant/TNS
Chemay Morales-James points to a fish approaching her son, Judah James’, 8, while Holly Dixon holds her son, Isaiah, 1, to look into the pond as the My Reflection Matters Village meets for a day of fishing and hiking at Southford Falls State Park Sept. 30. My Reflection Matters Village is a co-op of Connecticut parents of children of color who are home-schooling their children, using materials and processes that are more affirming to their children.

“Parents are deciding that the way school is designed doesn’t work for most kids, especially kids of color. They are not hearing the true history of who they are, the history of the country. They are not hearing what affirms their identities as Black and brown children,” Morales-James said.

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In 2016, Morales-James, a former teacher and mother of two from Watertown, started My Reflection Matters. The consulting service helps parents and educators find classroom materials and tools that are culturally responsive and affirming.

Her business has expanded to include My Reflection Matters Village, a membership co-op of parents who agree that public schools diminish kids’ self-esteem, teach them ineffective educational methods and indoctrinate them into a traditional whitewashed, racially insensitive version of history.

“We are Black, indigenous and other people of color on a journey toward liberated education, which we also call decolonized education,” Morales-James said. “I consider this liberation work. If we really want to raise free people, it would have to happen outside the system.”



a group of people in a park: Members of My Reflection Matters Village chat at Southford Falls State Park on Sept. 30 in Southbury.


© Kassi Jackson/Kassi Jackson/Hartford Courant/TNS
Members of My Reflection Matters Village

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