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Why The Traits Of Female Leadership Are Better Geared For The Global Pandemic

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As countries anticipate the second wave of Covid-19, recently published research provides evidence to show that countries with female leaders performed better on two significant counts; a lower number of positive Covid-19 cases and a lower number of Covid-19 related deaths. The authors of the research from the Universities of Reading and Liverpool, compared data using 194 countries dataset. Their data analysis included controls for other factors, such as GDP per capita, the population, the size of the urban population, and the proportion of elderly adults. Their findings demonstrated that Covid-19 related outcomes are systematically better in countries led by women.

Areas of differentiation, such as health expenditure, will impact results to Covid-19. Countries with a weaker health infrastructure are more likely to shut down quickly in a defensive measure, demonstrated by several developing countries, including India and South Africa. However, the decision to shut down countries quickly was not limited to regions with weaker health infrastructure but included countries like Germany and Taiwan, both led by women. Other factors, including countries more open to international travel, also demonstrated better performance. While these countries experienced a similar number of Covid-19 cases to other nations open to international travel, the subsequent deaths in countries with female leaders were noticeably lower.

The results

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Hedge Funds Are Betting On Adtalem Global Education Inc. (ATGE)

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We know that hedge funds generate strong, risk-adjusted returns over the long run, which is why imitating the picks that they are collectively bullish on can be a profitable strategy for retail investors. With billions of dollars in assets, professional investors have to conduct complex analyses, spend many resources and use tools that are not always available for the general crowd. This doesn’t mean that they don’t have occasional colossal losses; they do. However, it is still a good idea to keep an eye on hedge fund activity. With this in mind, let’s examine the smart money sentiment towards Adtalem Global Education Inc. (NYSE:ATGE) and determine whether hedge funds skillfully traded this stock.

Is Adtalem Global Education Inc. (NYSE:ATGE) ready to rally soon? The best stock pickers were in an optimistic mood. The number of long hedge fund bets inched up by 10 recently. Adtalem Global Education Inc. (NYSE:ATGE) was in 22 hedge funds’ portfolios at the end of June. The all time high for this statistics is 26. Our calculations also showed that ATGE isn’t among the 30 most popular stocks among hedge funds (click for Q2 rankings and see the video for a quick look at the top 5 stocks). Video: Watch our video about the top 5 most popular hedge fund stocks.

Hedge funds’ reputation as shrewd investors has been tarnished in the last decade as their hedged returns couldn’t keep up with the unhedged returns of the market indices. Our research has shown that hedge funds’ small-cap stock picks managed to beat the market by double digits annually between 1999 and 2016, but the margin of outperformance has been declining in recent years. Nevertheless, we were still able to identify in advance a select group of hedge fund holdings that outperformed the S&P 500 ETFs by

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Climate-friendly cooling to help ease global warming

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hvac
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

A new IIASA-led study shows that coordinated international action on energy-efficient, climate-friendly cooling could avoid as much as 600 billion tons CO2 equivalent of greenhouse gas emissions in this century.


Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) are mainly used for cooling and refrigeration. While they were originally developed to replace ozone-depleting substances that are being phased out under the Montreal Protocol, many HFCs are potent greenhouse gases with a global warming potential up to 12,400 times that of CO2 over a 100-year period.

The Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol, which entered into force in 2019, aims to phase down the consumption of HFCs by 2050. While previous agreements have resulted in improvements in the design and energy performance of, for instance, cooling equipment, the Kigali Amendment is the first to include maintaining and/or enhancing the energy efficiency of cooling technologies as an explicit goal. According to the authors of the study, which has been published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, there is however currently limited understanding of the potential future impacts of the Kigali Agreement on global warming and possible co-benefits from savings in electricity. The study is the first to try to quantify the overall effects of the Agreement on both greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions.

The researchers developed a range of long-term scenarios for HFC emissions under varying degrees of stringency in climate policy and also assessed co-benefits in the form of electricity savings and associated reductions in emissions. The results indicate that, due to technical opportunities to improve energy efficiency in cooling technologies, there is potential for significant electricity savings under a well-managed phase-down of HFCs.

“Our results show that the global cumulative HFC emissions from refrigerant use in cooling technologies would have been over 360 billion tons CO2

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World Health Organization estimates 10% of global population has contracted COVID-19

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WHO announced an alarming new statistic about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic

As the public continues to reel from the news that the president of the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, Dr. Michael Ryan, the executive director of the World Health Organization (WHO)’s health emergency program, has come forward to share an alarming new statistic.

Read More: Sen. Ron Johnson defends attendance at fundraiser after testing positive for COVID-19

 According to The Associated Press, on Monday, Ryan revealed that the most recent estimates indicate a significant percentage of the world’s population may have already been infected by the coronavirus this year.

A protester holds a sign reading ‘200K Dead Trump Kills USA’ at a march against ‘Death, Lies and Fascism’ on September 21, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Demonstrators protested against President Donald Trump’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic as the U.S. surpasses 204,000 deaths from the coronavirus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A protester holds a sign reading ‘200K Dead Trump Kills USA’ at a march against ‘Death, Lies and Fascism’ on September 21, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. Demonstrators protested against President Donald Trump’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic as the U.S. surpasses 204,000 deaths from the coronavirus. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

“The disease continues to spread. It is on the rise in many parts of the world,” Ryan explained during a special session of the organization’s executive board. “Our current best estimates tell us that about 10% of the global population may have been infected by this virus.”

He also pointed out that the stats vary from urban to rural areas, and between different groups, but that ultimately “the vast majority of the world remains at risk.”

One of those groups whose cases stand out amongst the pack is Black Americans who have been disproportionately affected by the virus, both medically and financially.

To put what 10% of the population looks like in clearer focus – what WHO is saying is that over 760 million people based on a current world population of about 7.6 billion have COVID-19. This by far exceeds the

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SIUE and SIUC to co-host annual Global Fusion Conference

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EDWARDSVILLE — Southern Illinois University Edwardsville together with SIU Carbondale will host the 20th Annual Global Fusion Conference Friday-Sunday Oct. 9-11 in what will be the event’s first-ever virtual gathering.

The goal of the conference is to promote academic excellence in global media and international communication studies. It is sponsored by a consortium of universities, including SIUE, SIUC, the University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, Ohio University and Temple University.

Under the theme “(In)visibility in global communication: Connections and Inequities,” the plenary panel brings together a rising filmmaker and two media scholars to discuss the Black Lives Matter and global anti-racist movement from Ferguson, Mo., to Cape Town, South Africa. Because it is virtual, there will be presenters from the Philippines, Myanmar, India and Europe.

According to Musonda Kapatamoyo, PhD, chair and professor in the SIUE College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Mass Communications, the virtual conference will provide participants with opportunities to network with leading experts in the field, which is beneficial for graduate students who want to pursue doctoral studies at other represented schools.

“Following the conference, we hope to advance knowledge and skillsets for our students and faculty through interacting with influential keynote speakers, inspiring presentations and alternative perspectives,” Kapatamoyo explained. “We have a couple of faculty members presenting at this conference. It is a perfect opportunity for our faculty to share their research and test findings in front of an invested, knowledgeable audience.”

Conference registration provides access to all conference events, including roundtables. To view the schedule of events and register, visit siue.edu/arts-and-sciences/global-fusion. The cost for students, faculty and independent scholars is $30. The conference will take place mostly live via Zoom with some prerecorded presentations.

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