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Webb’s first career goal sends Kingsway past Clearview in OT

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When Zach Webb suddenly found himself on the field Tuesday afternoon in a huge rivalry game, his main priority was to not stand out because of a glaring error.

He did end up finding the spotlight – but for all the right reasons.

Webb scored the game-winning goal just over four minutes into overtime to lift the Kingsway boys soccer team to a 2-1 victory over Clearview in Tri-County Conference Royal Division action.

Chris Spicer also scored an assisted on the game-winner as the Dragons improved to 2-2-1 overall and 2-1-1 in the division. The Pioneers suffered their first loss and fell to 3-1 overall and in the Royal.

“We had a corner kick and I have height so they told me to go up and try to score a goal,” said Webb, a sophomore defender. “But it wasn’t even a header; it was on the ground. I was in the right spot at the right time and I hit it and it went in. That was my first varsity goal and it was a great feeling.”

Spicer, a senior striker, collected the ball off the corner kick and did not hesitate in setting up his young teammate, who was all alone near the top of the box.

“I didn’t have an angle on that shot,” Spicer said. “I knew if I shot it would not have gone in and would have hit off a defender. So I went to my next best option and got it to the kid. I know he hasn’t played much but I had trust in him and he scored a great goal.”

The fact that Webb was even in the game was a surprise. He entered with about 24 minutes remaining in regulation to replace starting outside back Pat Roche, who suffered a high

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Hatton completes career goal by winning BMW PGA Championship

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VIRGINIA WATER, England (AP) — Tyrrell Hatton held off a final-round challenge by Victor Perez to win the BMW PGA Championship by four strokes on Sunday, giving the English player a first victory on home soil at a tournament that inspired him to become a professional.



England's Tyrell Hatton on the first fairway during day four of the PGA Championship at Wentworth Club, Virginia Water, England, Sunday Oct. 11, 2020. (Adam Davy/PA via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
England’s Tyrell Hatton on the first fairway during day four of the PGA Championship at Wentworth Club, Virginia Water, England, Sunday Oct. 11, 2020. (Adam Davy/PA via AP)

Hatton shot 5-under 67 to finish on 19-under 269 overall, capping a week when he shot in the 60s every round around Wentworth’s storied West Course.

It is the biggest win of his career, even topping his victory at the Arnold Palmer Invitational at Bay Hill in March that marked his breakthrough in the United States, where he has been playing for the past nine months either side of golf’s hiatus for the coronavirus pandemic.



England's Tyrell Hatton on the third tee during day four of the PGA Championship at Wentworth Club, Virginia Water, England, Sunday Oct. 11, 2020. (Adam Davy/PA via AP)


© Provided by Associated Press
England’s Tyrell Hatton on the third tee during day four of the PGA Championship at Wentworth Club, Virginia Water, England, Sunday Oct. 11, 2020. (Adam Davy/PA via AP)

Hatton used to attend this tournament — the elite event on the European Tour — as a child, and recalled this week the time he came to Wentworth as a 5-year-old with his father and was nearly struck by an errant tee shot from Vijay Singh.

“It’s unbelievable,” said Hatton, who acknowledged in a walkalong TV interview during the round that he was nervous. “This was a goal of mine, to win this tournament in my career.”

Hatton, who has sparked debate this week by wearing a hoodie, came into the final round with a three-stroke lead and was only really challenged by Perez, who moved into a share of the lead with

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Programmable medicine is the goal for new bio-circuitry research

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Programmable medicine is the goal for new bio-circuitry research
Researchers Holt and Kwong. Credit: Georgia Tech Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology

In the world of synthetic biology, the development of foundational components like logic gates and genetic clocks has enabled the design of circuits with increasing complexity, including the ability to solve math problems, build autonomous robots, and play interactive games. A team of researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology is now using what they’ve learned about bio-circuits to lay the groundwork for the future of programmable medicine.


Looking like any other small vial of clear liquid, these programmable drugs would communicate directly with our biological systems, dynamically responding to the information flowing through our bodies to automatically deliver proper doses where and when they are needed. These future medicines might even live inside us throughout our lives, fighting infection, detecting cancer and other diseases, essentially becoming a therapeutic biological extension of ourselves.

We are years away from that, but the insights gained from research in Gabe Kwong’s lab are moving us closer with the development of “enzyme computers”—engineered bio-circuits designed with biological components, with the capacity to expand and augment living functions.

“The long-term vision is this concept of programmable immunity,” said Kwong, associate professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, who partnered with fellow researcher Brandon Holt on the paper, “Protease circuits for processing biological information,” published Oct. 6 in the journal Nature Communications. The research was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health.

Programmable medicine is the goal for new bio-circuitry research
Analog-to-digital converter. Credit: Georgia Tech Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology

The story of this paper begins two years ago when, Holt said, “our lab has a rich history of developing enzyme-based diagnostics; eventually we started thinking about these systems as computers, which led us to design simple logic gates, such as AND

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Britain, Canada, EU throw weight behind 2030 biodiversity protection goal

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BRUSSELS/LONDON (Reuters) – Britain and Canada on Monday joined the European Union in pledging to protect 30% of their land and seas by 2030 to stem “catastrophic” biodiversity loss and help galvanise support for broader agreement on the target ahead of a U.N. summit.

FILE PHOTO: A bald eagle is pictured perched in a tree in Baddeck, Nova Scotia, Canada, August 15, 2019. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri/File Photo

With the twin crises of climate change and wildlife loss accelerating, leaders are trying to build momentum ahead of the meeting in Kunming, China, in May, where nearly 200 countries will negotiate a new agreement on protecting nature.

“We must act now – right now. We cannot afford dither and delay because biodiversity loss is happening today and it is happening at a frightening rate. Left unchecked, the consequences will be catastrophic for us all,” British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said.

“Extinction is forever – so our action must be immediate.”

Without action, 30% to 50% of all species could be lost by 2050, threatening economic and social prosperity, a report by The Nature Conservancy charity this month said. For example, losing bees, butterflies and other pollinators could cause a drop in annual agricultural output worth $217 billion.

Scientists have said a minimum of 30% of the planet must be safeguarded, through protected areas and conservation. A draft of the Kunming agreement includes this pledge.

While Monday’s pledges did not detail specific actions nor funding plans, protected areas are usually managed to ensure the long-term conservation of nature. This can mean curbing or banning commercial or extraction activities, ensuring unspoiled natural areas remain unspoiled, or restoring and maintaining ecosystems such as forests and wetlands.

“We have both the responsibility and the opportunity. We have the second largest land mass,