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Nissan Foundation launches 2021 grant cycle to build inclusive communities through education

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Nissan Foundation

Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America's commitment to enrich people's lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America’s commitment to enrich people’s lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
Established in 1992, the mission of the Nissan Foundation is to build community through valuing cultural diversity. The Nissan Foundation is part of Nissan North America’s commitment to enrich people’s lives by helping to meet the needs of communities throughout the U.S. through philanthropic investments, corporate outreach sponsorships and other charitable contributions.
  • Since 1992, the Nissan Foundation has awarded more than $12 million to more than 150 nonprofit organizations committed to promoting cultural awareness and understanding

  • The Nissan Foundation annually awards grants to nonprofits in California, Georgia, Michigan, Mississippi, New York, Tennessee and Texas

  • Deadline to submit Letters of Intent for 2021 grant cycle is November 13, 2020

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Oct. 14, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — In an effort to support organizations educating our world about the benefits of living and working together in a diverse society, the Nissan Foundation today announced it is accepting Letters of Intent for its 2021 grant cycle. Each year, the Nissan Foundation awards grants to nonprofits who serve communities surrounding Nissan’s affiliate locations in Southern California, Middle Tennessee, Central Mississippi, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Detroit, New York and Atlanta. Now in its 28th year, the foundation’s mission is to support education programs that help people see the world through multiple perspectives.

“The work our grantees do day in and day out to foster dialogue around race relations and to promote cultural diversity has never been more important,” says Parul Bajaj, executive director, Nissan Foundation. “The Nissan Foundation is

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Tomball Regional Health Foundation continues supporting community with recent grant to Lone Star College

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Lone Star College announced, Oct. 6, that the Tomball Regional Health Foundation awarded the Lone Star College Foundation grants worth $244,696 to help Lone Star College-Tomball’s nursing and lifePATH programs.

LSC-Tomball president Lee Ann Nutt said the college has a longstanding relationship with the Tomball Regional Health Foundation.

“They have been supportive of our programs and our college for many years, we have a great track record with them. …That’s allowed us to maintain this relationship of trust and support,” Nutt said. “Because of that relationship, trust and respect between us, we’ve been able to partner together quite a bit, I’m very grateful for that.”

The grant is technically one award but was split into two different parts, according to Nutt, with $244,696 going toward funding for additional lifePATH staffing and $101,839 helping provide more nursing equipment.


Tomball Hospital Authority CEO and THRF board treasurer Lynn LeBouef said the latest donation puts the foundation over $2 million worth of donations to LSC-Tomball in the last eight years.

“We’re pretty proud of that, been able to assist them on needs and haven’t had to raise tax dollars to provide that care,” LeBouef said.

Nutt said the college wouldn’t be able to purchase the necessary equipment without the foundation’s help.

“Health care equipment is very expensive and while we could purchase some, what they’ve allowed us to do is to equip our programs with the best equipment possible for our students,” Nutt said.

Nutt said the college needed additional options for nursing students to use health care training equipment amid COVID. More than half of the funding went to the purchase of

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21 MacArthur ‘Genius grant’ winners — including a neuroscientist, econometrician and historian — receive $625K each

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A legal scholar who studies how Black and other disadvantaged families are deprived of their real estate wealth.

A cognitive neuroscientist who taps a range of technologies to understand how the brain functions.

A jazz singer who is expanding what the art of song can achieve.

These are among winners of this year’s MacArthur Fellowships, popularly known as “genius grants.” Each will receive $125,000 annually for the next five years, with no strings attached, from the Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

“In the midst of civil unrest, a global pandemic, natural disasters, and conflagrations, this group of 21 exceptionally creative individuals offers a moment for celebration,” said Cecilia Conrad, managing director of the MacArthur Fellows, in a statement.

“They are asking critical questions, developing innovative technologies and public policies, enriching our understanding of the human condition, and producing works of art that provoke and inspire us.”

Following is the complete list of this year’s winners. For more information, visit www.macfound.org.

Isaiah Andrews, 34, Cambridge, Mass.

Andrews, an econometrician, develops “reliable and broadly applicable methods of statistical inference to address key challenges in economics, social science and medicine,” according to the foundation.

Tressie McMillan Cottom, 43, Chapel Hill, N.C.

The sociologist, writer and public scholar explores where issues of race, gender, education and digital technology converge. Her work spans academic scholarship to social media platforms.

Paul Dauenhauer, 39, Minneapolis.

A chemical engineer, Dauenhauer is developing technologies for turning materials drawn from organic, renewable sources into the “chemical building blocks” for items now made from fossil fuels.

Nels Elde, 47, Salt Lake City.

An evolutionary geneticist, Elde explores the processes that allow organisms to attack others or defend themselves.

Damien Fair, 44, Minneapolis.

Fair, a cognitive neuroscientist, investigates brain functioning via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), sophisticated mathematical

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Des Moines leader Nancy Mwirotsi receives $10,000 grant for STEM work

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Special to the Register
Published 5:34 a.m. CT Oct. 2, 2020

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Athletes from Ames, Hoover, North and Roosevelt speak before the DMPS March for Fairness.

Des Moines Register

Nancy Mwirotsi, founder of Pursuit of Innovation 515 (Pi515) in Des Moines, has been awarded a $10,000 Nation of Neighbors grant from Royal Neighbors of America, one of the first and largest women-led insurers in the country.

Mwirotsi is known in the area for her advocacy work on behalf of underserved women, refugees, and low-income students, the press release announcing the award stated. She will use the grant to expand her Girls Entrepreneurial Summit program that focuses on educating young women on business basics including planning, financials, marketing, and digital promotion.

“I am shocked and quite honored to have received this grant,” Mwirotsi said in the release. “It’s such a blessing to be recognized for your work.”

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Nancy Mwirotsi, founder and executive director of Pi515, speaks on Sept. 14, 2020 at Edmunds Elementary School in Des Moines. Attending speakers disapproved the model of 100% virtual instruction, instead advocating a hybrid model to better assist students with learning disabilities, language barriers, and less access to technology at home. Mwirotsi recently received a $10,000 grant for her work with Pi515. (Photo: Olivia Sun/The Register)

Pi515’s mission is to help create an inclusive culture for underserved women to learn STEM and provide them with the employment skills needed to launch them into new planes of achievement.

“Pi515 is taking on the inequity in STEM-related careers by directly addressing the pipeline. Each year, we embrace 100 students, particularly girls, from diverse backgrounds,” Mwirotsi said. “We introduce them to teachers and companies with employees who look like them, and provide role models that inspire them. We provide – at no cost – essential skills

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William Paterson University Awarded ‘Transformative’ STEM Grant

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WAYNE, NJ — William Paterson University was awarded a five-year, $1 million Scholarships-in-STEM grant from the National Science Foundation, the university announced.

The grant will support WPU students majoring in mathematics and computer science through scholarships and mentoring, according to the university.

“The overall goal of this project is to increase STEM degree completion of low-income, high achieving undergraduates with demonstrated financial need,” says Venkat Sharma, dean of the College of Science and Health, who serves as the team’s STEM administrator. “I congratulate all of our colleagues for their hard work in obtaining this highly competitive and transformative grant.”

Over the five-year duration, the project will support 26 first-year and transfer students who are pursuing bachelor’s degrees in mathematics, computer science, or computer information technology.

First year students will receive scholarship support for up to four years and transfer students will receive up to two years of scholarship support, the university said.

With this grant award, William Paterson intends to enroll three cohorts of low-income, academically talented students as mathematics and computer science (MaCS) scholars and support them with scholarships.

The University will also work to improve year-over-year retention rates for MaCS scholars who are first-time, full-time, first-year or transfer students, and improve graduation rates for all MaCS scholars.

Additionally, the funds will support a research study that investigates the relationship between college retention for low-income students and strength-based, culturally responsive mentoring. The proposed project will also refine the recruitment pipeline of females into the target STEM majors, which will increase enrollment and, consequentially, increase the number of underrepresented STEM graduates entering the workforce.

This grant will also allow the University to develop leadership programs at its seven partner schools, the university said. These include:

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