0

When Is The Next Solar And Lunar Eclipse? They’re Sooner Than You Think

Posted on

Eclipses are perhaps the most spectacular celestial events of all.

During an hours-long lunar eclipse the full Moon can turn a reddish-copper color for a few hours, while solar eclipses—which can last for just a few minutes—often leave onlookers scarred for life … in a good way!

In fact, if you’ve ever witnessed the brief totality of a total solar eclipse—when the world around you turns into twilight and you see the Sun’s bright white corona for a few seconds—you’ll know why there are thousands of dedicated eclipse-chasers who try to see as many as they can.

Trouble is, solar and lunar eclipses don’t come around very often.

However, there are now a few coming up fast.

MORE FROM FORBESCorona Vs Corona: It’s 100 Days Until The Rare Eclipse Coronavirus Is Named After. Will You See It?

In 2020 there are six eclipses; four lunar eclipses and two solar eclipses. We’re almost through with them, having already had lunar eclipses on:

There was also a solar eclipse—a rare kind called an annular or “ring of fire” eclipse:

So what’s left in 2020? One lunar eclipse—and the best one of the year for North Americans—and a rare total solar eclipse, the best eclipse of 2020, which will be seen only from South America.

Sadly, COVID-19 is playing havoc with that one.

Here’s everything you need to know about the next solar and lunar eclipses coming up soon, and the next eclipses of all kinds visible from North America.

When is the next lunar eclipse?

Date: Monday, November 30, 2020

Viewable

0

High radiation on moon means lunar bases should be buried for safety

Posted on

  • NASA recently unveiled the plan for its Artemis program, a series of missions that would return astronauts to the moon. 
  • A new study reveals how much radiation astronauts are exposed to on the lunar surface: a daily dose about 200 times greater than on Earth.
  • NASA wants to build a base on the moon, but the new data suggests it’d be safest to bury such a base under 2.5 feet of moon dirt to protect astronauts from radiation. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

NASA wants to build a permanent base on the moon by the 2030s — a place astronauts could stay for extended visits at the lunar south pole.

But according to a new study, any astronauts who go there would face levels of radiation nearly three times higher than what the astronauts on the space station deal with. In high enough doses, long-term exposure to this cosmic radiation poses significant health risks, including cataracts, cancer, and central nervous system diseases. 

The new research, published last week in the journal Science, calculates for the first time what a moon-walker’s daily dose of radiation would be — a number not previously known.

“If you think about people staying on the moon for extended periods of time, say on a scientific research station for a year or two, then these levels start getting problematic,” Robert Wimmer-Schweingruber, a co-author of the new study, told Business Insider. 

The solution, he said, would be for any lunar base to be built beneath the moon’s surface.

“Covering your habitat with sufficient amounts of lunar dirt should do the trick,” Wimmer-Schweingruber said.

The first study to calculate radiation on the moon

Apollo astronauts carried radiation-measuring instruments on their missions in the 1960s and 70s, but those dosimeters could only tell scientists the total amount