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Turkey to Revise Upward Its Major Gas Discovery in Black Sea

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(Bloomberg) —



a bridge over a body of water


© Photographer: Ali Mohammadi/Bloomberg


Turkey expects to raise its estimate for the amount of natural gas discovered in the Black Sea and plans to announce the new guidance as early as next week, according to people with direct knowledge of the matter.

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The government will outline a sizable revision to the initial discovery of 320 billion cubic meters of recoverable gas, unveiled in August, once exploratory drilling is completed this month, the people said, asking not to be named due to the sensitivity of the find.

The energy discovery in the Black Sea is critical for Turkey’s current-account balance which is dragged down by the need to import nearly all of the 50 billion cubic meters of gas the country consumes annually.

Drilling to a depth of around 4,500 meters (15,000 feet) at the Tuna-1 discovery would penetrate two additional formations that appear promising, a senior Turkish energy official said last month. A second drill ship is likely to be moved to the region next year.

Ankara has dramatically expanded energy exploration in the Black Sea and contested waters of the eastern Mediterranean. It’s keen to find sizable energy reserves to ease its heavy reliance on imports from Iran, Iraq and Russia, and support one of the biggest economies in the Middle East.

Shares of Turkish oil refiner Turkiye Petrol Rafinerileri AS, or Tupras, gained as much as 2% following the news, while petrochemical company Petkim Petrokimya Holding AS climbed as much as 4.5%. They were trading 1.7% higher and 3.8% higher as of 4:05 p.m., respectively. Shares of energy companies Aksa Enerji Uretim AS and Aygaz each rose 2.3%.

But the searches have mired the government in territorial disputes with Greece and Cyprus in the Mediterranean.

(Updates with moves in Turkish energy companies in the

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A major Japanese bank will let employees work 3-day weeks after the pandemic to give them more time for childcare and education

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a man wearing a suit and tie: fefe https://www.reutersconnect.com/all?channel=utd383&id=tag%3Areuters.com%2C2018%3Anewsml_RC1E5BAFE7D0%3A2117581700&search=all%3ATatsufumi%20Sakai


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  • Japanese lender Mizuho Financial Group is planning to let staff work a shorter week after the COVID-19 pandemic, giving them more time for childcare or education, Bloomberg reported. 
  • Workers who work three days a week will keep 60% of their salary, while employees who work four days will retain 80%, a spokeswoman told Bloomberg. 
  • The lender is in talks with labor unions, and the measure could be introduced as soon as December. 
  • The scheme could be open to 45,000 staff.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A major Japanese bank plans to offer employees three- or four-day working weeks after the COVID-19 pandemic passes, giving staff more time for childcare, nursing, or education, Bloomberg reported Wednesday. 

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Staff at Mizuho Financial Group who work three days a week will receive 60% of their salary, and those who work four days will keep 80%, the report said.

A company spokeswoman told Bloomberg the measures would give employees greater choice over how they approach their work.

The bank, currently the country’s third largest lender, is discussing the new rules with labor unions, and they could be introduced as early as December, a spokeswoman told Bloomberg. 

The lender, which provides a variety of financial services including securities brokerage, general banking, and asset management, said the program may be open to around 45,000 employees. 

The bank is estimated to have just under 60,000 employees. 

The plan comes at a time when the lender is looking to trim its office space both in London and New York, in anticipation of workers not returning to the workplace once the pandemic passes.

Hiroshi Nagamine, senior managing executive officer at the group, said in a September interview with Bloomberg that employees won’t need to return to the office every day after the

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An Illinois university got major pushback for cutting religion, French and anthropology. But other colleges are dropping the humanities too

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CHICAGO — Scott Sheridan didn’t expect his 23 years of teaching at Illinois Wesleyan University to end like this.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, Scott Sheridan, in Chicago, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.


© Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, Scott Sheridan, in Chicago, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.

Though fewer students are pursuing degrees in his areas of study these days, many still participate. This semester, more than 50 students at the campus in Bloomington are taking advanced classes in French cinema and Italian cultural history. The spots filled up so quickly that more were added, Sheridan said.

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But programs in French and Italian won’t continue beyond this school year. And neither will those in religion, anthropology, American cultural studies and three other academic departments slated to close in the 2021-22 school year. School officials say they plan to offer introductory courses in some of the affected topics, but new students won’t be able to major or minor in them.

The cuts are the result of a controversial curriculum review that began last year, pitting administrators trying to revamp offerings for career-oriented students and balance the budget against defenders of the humanities, including professors and alumni, who worry IWU will lose its identity as a bastion for liberal arts. Current students working toward degrees in affected programs will be able to complete them.

“People sometimes disregard or dismiss terms like humanities and liberal arts. They don’t understand what that does to their careers,” Sheridan said, explaining that skills such as critical thinking and communication are marketable. “We have an educational model in the United States that sometimes privileges the professional degree tracks.”

After Sheridan, a tenured professor, received notice that his position will be terminated in August 2021 and other instructors raised concerns about the decision-making process, a national association for university professors intervened and

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An Illinois university got major pushback for cutting religion, French and anthropology. But other colleges are dropping the humanities too.

Posted on

Scott Sheridan didn’t expect his 23 years of teaching at Illinois Wesleyan University to end like this.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.

Though fewer students are pursuing degrees in his areas of study these days, many still participate. This semester, more than 50 students at the campus in Bloomington are taking advanced classes in French cinema and Italian cultural history. The spots filled up so quickly that more were added, Sheridan said.

But programs in French and Italian won’t continue beyond this school year. And neither will those in religion, anthropology, American cultural studies and three other academic departments slated to close in the 2021-22 school year. School officials say they plan to offer introductory courses in some of the affected topics, but new students won’t be able to major or minor in them.

The cuts are the result of a controversial curriculum review that began last year, pitting administrators trying to revamp offerings for career-oriented students and balance the budget against defenders of the humanities, including professors and alumni, who worry IWU will lose its identity as a bastion for liberal arts. Current students working toward degrees in affected programs will be able to complete them.



a man standing next to a tree: Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.


© Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Scott Sheridan, a tenured professor of French and Italian at Illinois Wesleyan University, is losing his job as the school eliminates many offerings in the humanities.

“People sometimes disregard or dismiss terms like humanities and liberal arts. They don’t understand what that does to their careers,” Sheridan said, explaining that skills such as critical thinking and communication are marketable. “We have an educational model in the United

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The SEC’s two major matchups give us the weekend we’ve been waiting for in college football

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This is the weekend you’ve been waiting for in college football.

We’re slowly getting to a point where all Power 5 football is going to be played, and we’ll be back to something resembling a normal college football schedule in a world that has been anything but.

Saturday’s two biggest matchups — Texas A&M at Alabama and Auburn at Georgia — will definitely hit those normal vibes for college football fans. The noon ET games will serve as your appetizer for the gourmet servings of top-10 SEC football in the afternoon and evening.

The Crimson Tide bring back running back Najee Harris and wide receivers Jaylen Waddle and DeVonta Smith. Bama also has an experienced offensive line, with four starters back from 2019, and a defense stacked with players who will likely end up playing on Sundays.

The Aggies are ranked No. 13 but didn’t look the part last weekend in a 17-12 victory over Vanderbilt. Kellen Mond was expected to be one of the better quarterbacks in the SEC but had an average game. If you’re an A&M fan, you had better hope he was just knocking off some rust. Otherwise, it could be a long afternoon in Tuscaloosa.

Alabama’s Nick Saban, right, and Texas A&M’s Jimbo Fisher face off in a matchup between two top-15 teams. Wesley Hitt/Getty Images

In the evening, the Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry gives us seventh-ranked Auburn visiting No. 4 Georgia. The two are meeting as top-10 teams for the sixth time in the rivalry’s history, with Georgia having won the most recent — the 2017 SEC championship game.

The Bulldogs come into this game not knowing exactly who

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