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Whoopi Goldberg reveals Paul Simon’s lasting career advice

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a man wearing sunglasses posing for the camera: Whoopi Goldberg


© Bang Showbiz
Whoopi Goldberg

Whoopi Goldberg says Paul Simon once warned her that “a lot of people aren’t going to get you”.

The 64-year-old actress recalled meeting the music star at a party years ago and Simon gave her some lasting career advice, encouraging Whoopi to be herself even if other people perceive her to be “strange”.

Remembering their encounter at the star-studded bash, Whoopi – who is one of only sixteen entertainers to have won an Emmy Award, a Grammy Award, an Academy Award, and a Tony Award – shared: “We had one of the best conversations I’ve ever had … Paul Simon said listen, ‘It’s going to get very fast and a lot is going to happen.'”

The music icon warned Whoopi that her quirks won’t always be understood by some people within the entertainment industry.

However, he also encouraged her not to dilute her personality in search of acceptance.

She recalled him saying to her: “I just want to tell you a lot of people aren’t going to get you, you will be strange to them.”

Since 2007, Whoopi has been co-hosting the talk show ‘The View’, and she’s admitted to loving her time on the programme.

The actress – who starred in ‘The Color Purple’ and ‘Sister Act’ – relishes sharing the screen with so many opinionated, passionate co-presenters.

Speaking to Naomi Campbell’s ‘No Filter with Naomi’ YouTube channel about her co-presenters, Whoopi said: “You have five different personalities, five different ways of thinking, five different ways of delivering and everyone has their borders … you don’t want to make it personal … real friends don’t make it personal unless they’re looking for a [real] fight.”

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Nobel Prize in Economics awarded to Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson of Stanford University

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“Their discoveries have benefited sellers, buyers and taxpayers around the world,” the prize committee said.

The men were honored for theoretical insights into developing the best rules for bidding and for establishing the final price. The resulting improvements in auction formats have proven especially useful in auctioning off goods and services that are difficult to price using traditional methods, such as radio frequencies, the committee said.

Wilson, 83, was cited for theoretical research that explored “the winner’s curse” in auctions of goods that ultimately had the same value to all potential buyers, such as minerals in a specific geographic area. He developed a theory explaining the tendency of successful bidders to place bids lower than their own estimate of the item’s value to themselves or other buyers, because they feared paying too much.

Milgrom, 72, drew the nod for developing a more general theory of auctions involving values that vary between bidders. After analyzing bidding strategies in several popular auctions, he showed the best format to be one in which bidders learn more about each other’s estimated values during bidding.

Auctions are embedded throughout the modern economy. Art houses use them to sell paintings and antiquities. Search engines rely on them to dispose of advertising space. And public authorities offer airport landings slots and mineral rights via auctions.

Global financial markets also operate on their principles.

Asked by reporters about his own use of auctions, Wilson mentioned that he had recently purchased a pair of ski boots on eBay. “It’s something you encounter a lot,” he said.

The prize committee said that Milgrom and Wilson had invented new formats for simultaneously auctioning off many interrelated objects for societal benefit rather than maximal revenue. In 1994, the U.S. government first used their insights to auction off radio frequencies to telecommunications companies.

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Paul Johnson For Princeton Board Of Education

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PRINCETON, NJ — A lifelong Princeton resident, Paul Johnson says he’s running for a seat in the Board of Education because he genuinely cares “about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools, as well as all the children in our community.”

A student-athlete coach, Johnson is running with Karen Lemon and William “Bill” Hare as a slate.

Read below to learn more about Johnson and his platform for the upcoming elections in Princeton.

Name – Paul Johnson

Age (as of Election Day) – 36

Position Sought – Board of Education Does anyone in your family work in politics or government? No

Education –

BA Anthropology, University of Virginia.

Occupation –

Student-athlete coach and mentor

Previous or Current Elected or Appointed Office – None

Campaign website –

www.jlhforboe.com

Why are you seeking elective office?

As the late, great John Lewis so eloquently put it, “To get in trouble, good trouble, necessary trouble.” We are at a crossroads in our society and we must be proactive rather than reactive. It is time for a change on our school Board, it is time we tackle our issues of equity/equality head on, without reserve. It is time for us to be honest with ourselves and admit we have fallen short of the promises we have made to our children in this town. We have failed to be leaders for social justice and reform. We have failed to have open and honest dialogue with our families and our community. I am running because I believe I can be part of the necessary change which will ensure our students and families a better tomorrow. I am running because I genuinely care about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools (grades 3, 5 and 11)

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Paul Lawrie to call time on European Tour career after Scottish Open

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Former Open champion Paul Lawrie will call time on his European Tour career after completing his 620th appearance in this week’s ASI Scottish Open.

Lawrie, who lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie in 1999 and won seven other titles as well as being part of Europe’s ‘Miracle at Medinah’ in the 2012 Ryder Cup, has been hampered by a back injury in recent years and will focus his attention on the senior circuit from now on.

The 51-year-old is exempt for the Open Championship until the age of 60 but has yet to decide whether he will continue to compete in the game’s oldest major.

Scotland’s Paul Lawrie kisses the trophy after winning the 1999 Open Championship at Carnoustie (Ben Curtis/PA)

“There are a lot of factors behind the decision, the main one being that I don’t feel I can be competitive week in, week out at this level,” Lawrie said after an opening two-over-par 73 at the Renaissance Club.

“My back is not very good, I’ve got a herniated disc and I struggle to practice enough. I’m not able to hit the amount of balls I need. I’m not particularly talented so I lose my game quite quickly.

“I need to hit hundreds of balls but if I hit 50 or 60 now I have to go and sit down and come back in the afternoon.

“I’m also very busy off the course and I enjoy that more than the golf these days.

“To have played 620 events is not a bad innings considering I turned pro (in 1986) with a five handicap and didn’t think I’d play any. I haven’t been a great player, but I’ve been decent and that’s all you can ask for.

“I’m kind of almost pleased that I’m 51 and not 22 the

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Paul Lawrie: Scot to end European Tour career after 620 appearances

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Emotional Lawrie calls time on his European Tour career

Former Open champion Paul Lawrie says his “body is in bits” as he confirmed he will retire from the European Tour after this week’s Scottish Open.

The 51-year-old Scot, who lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie in 1999 and won seven other titles, has struggled with a back injury in recent years.

After his 620th Tour appearance, he will focus on the senior circuit.

“The main factor is I don’t feel I can be competitive week in, week out at this level,” said Lawrie.

“My back is not very good, I’ve got a herniated disc and I struggle to practise enough. I’m not able to hit the amount of balls I need. I’m not particularly talented so I lose my game quite quickly.

“I’m also very busy off the course and I enjoy that more than the golf these days.”

Lawrie – who posted an opening two-over-par 73 at the Renaissance Club in East Lothian – has an exemption for the Open Championship until 60, but is undecided over whether he will continue to play in the game’s oldest major.

He claimed his last European Tour title in the Johnnie Walker Championship at Gleneagles in 2012, the same year was part of Europe’s ‘Miracle at Medinah’ in the Ryder Cup.

“To have played 620 events is not a bad innings considering I turned pro [in 1986] with a five handicap and didn’t think I’d play any,” he added. “I haven’t been a great player, but I’ve been decent and that’s all you can ask for.

“I’m kind of almost pleased that I’m 51 and not 22 the way it’s going. Technology has been unbelievable. My body is in bits and I’m still hitting it the same distance as I did when