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NCAA: College survey finds support for Power 5 breakaway

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Three-fourths of college athletics leaders believe the NCAA governing structure needs major, immediate reform, and more than half of Power 5 college administrators support breaking away from NCAA Division I to form a fourth division solely made up of the division’s top 65 schools.

That’s according to a sweeping survey of college leaders this summer conducted by the Knight Commission, a longstanding independent group that promotes reforms that support the educational mission of college sports. The commission’s survey, conducted from June 18 to July 14, produced a 180-page report that provides a window into the thinking of NCAA leadership. 

Those surveyed included more than 350 college presidents, conference commissioners, athletic directors, college athlete leaders and institutionally designated faculty athletics representatives and senior woman administrators. Data for the survey’s respondent base are accurate within a 5% margin with a 95% confidence level, the commission said during a presentation Tuesday revealing the data.

Overall satisfaction with current NCAA Division I governance

Overall, the survey showed a strong attitude toward governance reform, low satisfaction with inequalities in college athletics finances and, maybe most notably, an openness for a radical restructuring of Division I’s competition levels, such as creating a new division for Power 5 programs in all sports except basketball, or separating Football Bowl Subdivision football from the NCAA.

Likelihood to support implementing proposed potential change

In fact, 61% of Power 5 administrators say they are more likely to support creating a fourth division of the NCAA that includes only Power 5 programs. Just 15% of Power 5 administrators say they are against such, with 24% being neutral. All other segments of Division I—Group of Five, FCS and non–football playing members—are categorically opposed to the Power 5 breaking away, the survey found.

Meanwhile, 44% of leaders support keeping together FBS programs but separating FBS football from the NCAA, while 31% are against that. One-quarter

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College Football Power Rankings: North Carolina, Texas A&M rocket upwards after top 25 wins

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CBS Sports graphic

If you didn’t believe it before, you’d better believe it now: Defense is all but extinct. It certainly seemed that way on a weekend where 31 of the 58 teams playing scored at least 30 points.

That shouldn’t be surprising because the average FBS team is scoring 30.3 points per game in 00. If that holds up, it would be a record.

Adding to the fun …

  • Ole Miss and Alabama combined for the most yards ever in a regulation SEC game.
  • Texas and Oklahoma played in the highest-scoring Red River Showdown, which went to four overtimes.
  • Texas A&M beat a top five team (Florida) for the first time since 2002. The Aggies needed 41 points to do it.

What that means for this week’s biggest game is fascinating. Alabama just rolled up its most yards ever on Ole Miss. It now hosts Georgia, which is No. 2 nationally in total defense. I’m sensing something similar to nuclear fission where everything around that clash is reduced to ash, especially if Nick Saban needs his offense to run up 743 yards to win.

“I’m not really calm,” Saban said after surviving Ole Miss, 63-48. “I’m boiling and bubbling, trying to be encouraging to the players.”

First, he has to settle down himself if recent history repeats. The Crimson Tide have given up at least 42 points three times in the last eight games. Before that, Alabama gave up 42 points three times in the prior 65 games.

Editor’s note: Teams from the five conferences not yet playing in the 2020 college football season will be eligible for the Power Rankings beginning Monday, Oct. 19.

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Clemson

The trees wasted on newsprint chronicling whether Clemson will finally be challenged in the ACC could

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Without nuclear power, the world’s climate challenge will get a whole lot harder

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The Covid-19 crisis not only delivered an unprecedented shock to the world economy. It also underscored the scale of the climate challenge we face: Even in the current deep recession, global carbon emissions remain unsustainable.



a sunset in the background: White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. - Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)


© Sebastien Berda/AFP/Getty Images
White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. – Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)

If the world is to meet energy security and climate goals, clean energy must be at the core of post-Covid-19 economic recovery efforts. Strong growth in wind and solar energy and in the use of electric cars gives us grounds for hope, as does the promise of emerging technologies like hydrogen and carbon capture. But the scale of the challenge means we cannot afford to exclude any available technologies, including nuclear power — the world’s second-largest source of low-carbon electricity after hydropower.

The power sector is the key to the clean energy transition. It is the single largest source of global emissions because most electricity is generated from fossil fuels. By significantly expanding the amount of electricity produced from low-carbon sources, we can help to reduce emissions not only from power generation, but also from sectors like transport, where low-carbon electricity can now fuel cars, trucks and buses.

This is a major undertaking. Low-carbon electricity generation will need to triple by 2040 to put the world on track to reach energy and climate goals. That is the equivalent of adding Japan’s entire power system to the global grid every year. It is very difficult to see how this can be done without a considerable contribution from nuclear power.

Nuclear power generated a near-record amount of electricity

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Newsweek College Football Rankings, SEC’s Power Shift and Big 12 Chaos

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One week after Mississippi State went into Baton Rouge and upset the defending national champs, the Bulldogs went home to Starkville and came back to Earth with a thud. Mississippi State lost to Arkansas, as the Razorbacks snapped a 20-game losing streak in SEC play.

That’s a microcosm of college football this weekend.

Texas looked to be the frontrunner in the Big 12, but the Longhorns lost at home to TCU. The Oklahoma Sooners lost at Iowa State for the first time since 1960. The Sooners are 0-2 in the Big 12 and tied for last place with Kansas and Texas Tech.

TCU Horned Frogs
Max Duggan #15 of the TCU Horned Frogs celebrates after rushing for a touchdown in the fourth quarter against the Texas Longhorns at Darrell K Royal-Texas Memorial Stadium on October 03, 2020 in Austin, Texas. TCU knocked off the Longhorns, 33-31, moving both teams to 1-1 in the Big 12 Conference.
Photo by Tim Warner/Getty Images

Tennessee surprisingly has the nation’s longest winning streak at eight games, which is tied with Notre Dame.

With the way 2020 has happened, it’s no surprise that this has already been a wacky college football season so far. There seems to be a shift in power in the SEC from the West to the East, the Big 12 is a total mess right now and Notre Dame and Miami are emerging in the ACC. North Carolina and Virginia Tech are also undefeated in the ACC, and they will square off this Saturday in North Carolina for a rematch of last year’s six-overtime game—which the Hokies won.

And how about this upcoming game on Saturday: Coastal Carolina (3-0) at Louisiana (3-0).

One thing that has remained constant, though, is that Clemson and Alabama are still clearly the best teams in college football, and

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SEC college football power rankings led by Alabama, Georgia, Florida

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Alabama crushed Texas A&M (again). Once relevant, this series sits firmly in the Crimson Tide’s corner.

Ole Miss landed the first win of the Lane Kiffin era by topping Kentucky in overtime. Already, you can see how the Rebels’ offense will cause trouble in the SEC.

And in the biggest game of the week, Georgia beat Auburn to solidify its place in the College Football Playoff race.

The second weekend of the SEC season was a revealing one. What’s clear: Alabama, Florida and Georgia are the teams to beat. After two games, here’s an updated look at the conference power rankings.

1. Alabama (Last week: No. 1)

The Crimson Tide don’t budge from atop the list after a 52-24 win against Texas A&M paced by quarterback Mac Jones, who had three touchdown passes of at least 60 yards. Aided by an explosive receiver corps, Jones has gone from a question mark heading into the preseason to a part of the Heisman Trophy race.

2. Georgia (No. 3)

Sluggish in a win against Arkansas to kick off the year, Georgia put together a more complete performance to beat Auburn 27-6 and climb into second place behind Alabama. The Bulldogs controlled the line of scrimmage and protected quarterback Stetson Bennett, who threw for 240 yards.

Georgia defensive back Mark Webb intercepts a pass in front of Auburn wide receiver Anthony Schwartz during the second half at Sanford Stadium. (Photo: Dale Zanine, USA TODAY Sports)

3. Florida (No. 2)

Florida’s rebuild on offense is complete. The Gators have a pair of Heisman Trophy contenders in quarterback Kyle Trask, who threw for another four touchdowns in a 38-24 win against South Carolina, and tight end Kyle Pitts, who now has six scoring grabs through two

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