presidential

0

Explainer: The Electoral College and the 2020 U.S. presidential race

Posted on

(Reuters) – In the United States, the winner of a presidential election is determined not by a national vote but through a system called the Electoral College, which allots “electoral votes” to all 50 states and the District of Columbia based on their population.

FILE PHOTO: North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake/File Photo

Complicating things further, a web of laws and constitutional provisions kick in to resolve particularly close elections.

Here are some of the rules that could decide the Nov. 3 contest between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

How does the Electoral College work?

There are 538 electoral votes, meaning 270 are needed to win the election. In 2016, President Donald Trump lost the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton but secured 304 electoral votes to her 227.

Technically, Americans cast votes for electors, not the candidates themselves. Electors are typically party loyalists who pledge to support the candidate who gets the most votes in their state. Each elector represents one vote in the Electoral College.

The Electoral College was a compromise between the nation’s founders, who fiercely debated whether the president should be picked by Congress or through a popular vote.

All but two states use a winner-take-all approach: The candidate that wins the most votes in that state gets all of its electoral votes. Maine and Nebraska use a more complex district-based allocation system that could result in their combined nine electoral votes being split between Trump and Biden.

Can electors go rogue?

Yes.

In 2016, seven of the 538 electors cast ballots for someone other than their state’s popular vote winner, an unusually high number.

Thirty-two states and the District of Columbia have

0

The Electoral College and the 2020 U.S. presidential race

Posted on

By Jan Wolfe



a person sitting on a wooden cutting board: FILE PHOTO: North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina


© Reuters/Jonathan Drake
FILE PHOTO: North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina

(Reuters) – In the United States, the winner of a presidential election is determined not by a national vote but through a system called the Electoral College, which allots “electoral votes” to all 50 states and the District of Columbia based on their population.

Complicating things further, a web of laws and constitutional provisions kick in to resolve particularly close elections.

Here are some of the rules that could decide the Nov. 3 contest between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

How does the Electoral College work?

There are 538 electoral votes, meaning 270 are needed to win the election. In 2016, President Donald Trump lost the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton but secured 304 electoral votes to her 227.

Technically, Americans cast votes for electors, not the candidates themselves. Electors are typically party loyalists who pledge to support the candidate who gets the most votes in their state. Each elector represents one vote in the Electoral College.

The Electoral College was a compromise between the nation’s founders, who fiercely debated whether the president should be picked by Congress or through a popular vote.

All but two states use a winner-take-all approach: The candidate that wins the most votes in that state gets all of its electoral votes. Maine and Nebraska use a more complex district-based allocation system that could result in their combined nine electoral votes being split between Trump and Biden.

Can electors go rogue?

Yes.

In 2016, seven of the 538 electors cast ballots for someone other than their state’s popular vote winner, an unusually high number.

Thirty-two states and the District of Columbia have

0

Vice Presidential debate between Harris and Pence taught us little

Posted on

Ruben Navarrette Jr., Opinion columnist
Published 3:15 a.m. ET Oct. 9, 2020

I saw two people who were oblivious to how annoying it is for voters to see politicians who — while perhaps well-versed in social studies — still managed to come up short on social skills.

The elephant in the room in Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate wasn’t an elephant at all. It was a zebra.

When Sen. Kamala Harris and Vice President Mike Pence took the stage, the contrast was as clear as black and white.

In fact, even before Harris and Pence arrived at Kingsbury Hall on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City, some commentators were euphemistically alluding to the fact that the candidates came from different backgrounds.

It’s a safe bet they weren’t talking about how the 61-year-old Pence is a product of Columbus, Indiana and 55-year-old Harris was — as she was sure to emphasize at one point — born in Oakland, California. 

Riots, looting and systemic racism

After a tense summer of racial unrest in dozens of U.S. cities, and Americans more divided on the issue of race than we have been since the 1960’s, there they were on stage — albeit socially-distancing from one another: a Black woman and a White man. 

This kind of matchup doesn’t happen every day. In fact, it has never happened before in all of U.S. history. Oh, there have been two other women nominated for vice president by a major political party — Geraldine Ferraro in 1984 and Sarah Palin in 2008. But they were both White.

Watching the start of the debate, I anticipated that fireworks were on the way — and, more than likely, over the issue of race.

Yet, for the first 30 minutes of the debate, race did not come

0

University of Utah proceeding as planned for vice presidential debate Wednesday

Posted on

The vice presidential debate Wednesday is still proceeding as planned for now after President Trump’s positive coronavirus diagnosis, according to the University of Utah.

The university is hosting the event in Salt Lake City on Oct. 7.

A university spokesman said Friday that anybody who requests access to the security perimeter and those in the debate hall must test negative for the coronavirus and wear a mask at all times.

Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala D. Harris both tested negative for the virus Friday.

There will be exceptions for the mask mandate during the debate for Mr. Pence, Ms. Harris, and moderator Susan Page.

According to reporters who were at Tuesday’s debate between Mr. Trump and Joseph R. Biden, many people on the president’s side of the room, including his four adult children, eschewed the Cleveland Clinic’s requirement that attendees wear masks once they were in their seats.

First lady Melania Trump, who also tested positive for the virus, was spotted wearing a mask as she walked to her seat but eventually took it off, according to Bloomberg’s Tyler Pager.

Mr. Trump himself lampooned Mr. Biden during the debate for his mask-wearing habits.

“Our policy is that everyone must wear a mask,” said Shawn Wood, the University of Utah spokesman, when asked about possible enforcement mechanisms for attendees at the vice presidential debate.

The Cleveland Clinic, the health advisor for the Commission on Presidential Debates, said in a statement Friday that everyone inside the debate hall on Tuesday had tested negative for COVID-19 prior to entry and that they believe there was a low risk of exposure for the guests.

“Individuals entering the debate hall were masked and in some cases removed their masks once seated,” the medical center also said. “A Cleveland Clinic physician

0

America’s Reaction After First Presidential Debate

Posted on

Long Island University National Poll: America’s Reaction After First Presidential Debate

PR Newswire

BROOKVILLE, N.Y., Oct. 1, 2020

BROOKVILLE, N.Y., Oct. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Results of a breaking Long Island University Steven S. Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling, and Analysis national poll were announced in the aftermath of the first presidential debate for Election 2020.

Long Island University (PRNewsfoto/Long Island University)
Long Island University (PRNewsfoto/Long Island University)

HIGH VIEWERSHIP
National poll results found that 80 percent of respondents tuned in to watch President Donald Trump debate former Vice President Joe Biden on Tuesday evening. High viewership of the event was supported by Neilsen ratings that estimated 73.1 million Americans watched the debate.

WHO DID A BETTER A JOB IN THE DEBATE? 
BIDEN 41%; TRUMP 22%; NO DIFFERENCE 18%; NO OPINION 19%
Americans were asked who they thought did a better job in Tuesday evening’s debate between Trump and Biden. Among respondents, 41 percent said that Biden did a better job in the debate, while 22 percent said that Trump had a stronger performance. More than a third of respondents (37 percent) said there was no difference (18 percent) or gave no opinion on the matter (19 percent).

WHO WOULD YOU VOTE FOR IF THE ELECTION WERE HELD TODAY?
BIDEN 48%; TRUMP 31%; UNDECIDED 9%; ANOTHER CANDIDATE 7%
After the presidential debates ended on Tuesday evening, Americans were asked who they would vote for if the election were held today. Respondents said they would vote for Biden (48 percent), Trump (31 percent), and another candidate (7 percent). An additional 9 percent of respondents said they were undecided and 5 percent said they wouldn’t vote if the elections were held today.

ECONOMY IS THE ONE ISSUE THAT MATTERS MOST FOR VOTERS
While a variety of factors were mentioned, the one issue that mattered most on deciding

1 2