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Princeton Agrees To Nearly $1M In Back Pay To Female Professors : NPR

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Blair Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The university has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female full professors, but did not admit liability in the Labor Department’s investigation.

John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images


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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Blair Hall on the campus of Princeton University. The university has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female full professors, but did not admit liability in the Labor Department’s investigation.

John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

One of the nation’s most prestigious universities has agreed to pay nearly $1 million in back pay to female professors following allegations of pay discrimination.

The Ivy League university will pay $925,000 in back pay and at least $250,000 in future wages, as part of an agreement announced by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The agreement resolves pay disparities uncovered by a multi-year investigation that affected more than 100 female full professors, the Labor Department’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs said.

The federal government’s investigation found between 2012 and 2014, pay disparities at the university “existed for 106 female employees in the full professor position,” the Labor Department said.

If confirmed, those findings would appear to violate federal equal opportunity laws.

The New Jersey-based university entered what is known as an “early resolution conciliation agreement.” A university spokesperson said in an e-mailed statement to NPR that it accepted the agreement to forgo what would likely be a costly and drawn out litigation process.

Princeton did not admit any liability in the investigation, Ben Chang, a spokesperson from Princeton, said in an emailed statement. He said that university officials did an internal analysis during the two year period the Labor Department says it was in violation, but found “no meaningful pay disparities based

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Princeton Board of Education Profile: Michele Tuck-Ponder

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PRINCETON, NJ — Incumbent Princeton Board of Education Vice-President Michele Tuck-Ponder is running for another term this coming election.

A resident of Princeton, Tuck-Ponder has held various offices in over the past 30 years, including Mayor. Tuck-Ponder says she’s a strong advocate for reasonable spending and cost saving measures. She wants to ensure all students get equal and excellent education without putting much burden on the taxpayer.

Read below to learn more about Tuck-Ponder and her platform for the upcoming elections in Princeton.

Name – Michele Tuck-Ponder

Age (as of Election Day) – 62

Position Sought – Member, Board of Education

Does anyone in your family work in politics or government? – No

Education –

B.S. Journalism, Northwestern University

J.D. University of Pennsylvania Law School

Occupation –

Executive Director, Destination Imagination (2017- present)

Previous or Current Elected or Appointed Office –

Princeton Township Committeewoman

Mayor, Princeton Township

Commissioner, Princeton Housing Authority

Campaign website –

www.mtp4boe.com

Why are you seeking elective office?

There are few more important duties of a community than ensuring that all children are provided with the best education possible. I am running for re-election to the Princeton Board of Education because of my commitment to equity in Princeton Public Schools. Good intentions and mission statements have proven to be ineffective in moving PPS to correct the inequities in our district. For the past three years, I have used my voice and my vote on the Board of Education to highlight and address issues of inequity in our schools.

The single most pressing issue facing our community is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

Affordability. It is almost impossible for low income people to find affordable housing, taxpayers are feeling pressured, and schools and municipalities are struggling to meet the needs of our

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Paul Johnson For Princeton Board Of Education

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PRINCETON, NJ — A lifelong Princeton resident, Paul Johnson says he’s running for a seat in the Board of Education because he genuinely cares “about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools, as well as all the children in our community.”

A student-athlete coach, Johnson is running with Karen Lemon and William “Bill” Hare as a slate.

Read below to learn more about Johnson and his platform for the upcoming elections in Princeton.

Name – Paul Johnson

Age (as of Election Day) – 36

Position Sought – Board of Education Does anyone in your family work in politics or government? No

Education –

BA Anthropology, University of Virginia.

Occupation –

Student-athlete coach and mentor

Previous or Current Elected or Appointed Office – None

Campaign website –

www.jlhforboe.com

Why are you seeking elective office?

As the late, great John Lewis so eloquently put it, “To get in trouble, good trouble, necessary trouble.” We are at a crossroads in our society and we must be proactive rather than reactive. It is time for a change on our school Board, it is time we tackle our issues of equity/equality head on, without reserve. It is time for us to be honest with ourselves and admit we have fallen short of the promises we have made to our children in this town. We have failed to be leaders for social justice and reform. We have failed to have open and honest dialogue with our families and our community. I am running because I believe I can be part of the necessary change which will ensure our students and families a better tomorrow. I am running because I genuinely care about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools (grades 3, 5 and 11)

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Inside David Adjaye’s Design for the New Princeton University Art Museum

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In the historic core of its campus, Princeton University will soon receive a new cultural beacon. Unveiled recently, the design for its art museum by AD100 and Royal Gold Medal–winning architect Sir David Adjaye will create a porous, flexible building, a replacement for the current home of the university’s collections on the same site. In collaboration with museum director James Steward and architecture firm Cooper Robertson, Adjaye has proposed a reconstruction that will double the square footage of the existing facility, introduce a contemporary design that references its historic neighbors, and give the museum a new sense of accessibility when it opens in 2024.

<div class="caption"> The entrance hall and Grand Stair provide welcome and access to the second and third floors. </div> <cite class="credit">Photo: Courtesy of Adjaye Associates</cite>

The entrance hall and Grand Stair provide welcome and access to the second and third floors.

Photo: Courtesy of Adjaye Associates

The existing museum is a “patchwork of different expansions and times that have been welded together,” so navigating its galleries is difficult and some spaces have become more prominent than others due to visibility, explains Adjaye. Its current form “constrained curatorial opportunities,” adds university architect Ron McCoy, and “did not meet the academic needs of a modern teaching museum and had no dedicated space for public events.” The new three-story building will be composed of seven connected pavilions that allow a substantial number of works to be exhibited at the same time on one level. In addition to creating more opportunities for discovery within the collection, the design plans galleries that alternate in size, reducing the fatigue that sameness can bring to a visitor. “The interior enhances the storytelling of art,” says Adjaye, who cites the triple-height lobby, connected to the existing library, and the Grand Hall, a space at the heart of the building for open storage display or lectures, as other elements of the new museum that will bring students, faculty, and visitors

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Princeton Board of Education Profile: Beth Behrend

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PRINCETON, NJ — Incumbent Princeton Board of Education President Beth Behrend is running for another term this coming election.

A product of public schools, Behrend emphasizes on the importance of a good public education. She says her focus has always been on putting students first while dealing with the various challenges brought on by the pandemic.

Read below to learn more about Behrend and her platform for the upcoming elections in Princeton.

Name – Beth Behrend

Age (as of Election Day) – 52

Position Sought – Board of Education, Princeton Public Schools

Family – I live in the Riverside neighborhood of Princeton with my husband, Robert, and our three children, ages 14, 16 and 18, and our dog, Truffles, and four finches. My children attend/have attended Riverside Elementary, the Princeton Unified Middle School, The Pennington School and PHS. Our oldest (PHS 2020) is a freshman at Princeton University.

Does anyone in your family work in politics or government?

Yes, my brother is Register of Deeds in Waukesha County, Wisconsin.

Education – I am a product of public schools, originally from Hartland, Wisconsin, with degrees from the University of Wisconsin – Madison (BA) and the University of Michigan Law School (JD & LLM in Public International Law).

Occupation – I worked in NY and abroad as a corporate attorney advising Fortune 500 companies on global financings, joint ventures, acquisitions, governance and regulatory matters (8 years) and then in Princeton as corporate counsel for Medarex, Inc., a public biopharmaceutical company (9 years). I’ve spent the past ten years as a community volunteer and trustee in local non-profit organizations, including the Riverside PTO, the PTO Council, the Watershed, the Princeton School Garden Cooperative, the NJ League of Conservation Voters Education Fund, and the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton.

Previous or Current Elected or