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Newly Discovered ‘Extreme’ Alien Planet Is Super Hot At 5,800 Fahrenheit, Researchers Reveal

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KEY POINTS

  • CHEOPS has released the results of its observation on alien planet WASP-189b
  • WASP-189b’s orbit is tilted dramatically and orbits its star every 2.7 Earth days
  • WASP-189b has temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit

The European Space Agency’s Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS) has recently discovered an alien planet about 1.6 times the size of Jupiter. Aside from having a strange orbit, it is also scorching hot.

WASP-189b, the newly discovered alien planet, was first detected in 2018 and has been recorded to have temperatures reaching 5,800 Fahrenheit — almost as hot as Earth’s outer core and is even hot enough to turn iron into gas, ESA’s study revealed.

Aside from having a size comparable to Jupiter, the exoplanet is also considered a “Hot Jupiter” due to its extremely short orbital period (2.7 Earth days). A Hot Jupiter is a gas planet with a “Jupiter-like” size that orbits very close to its star.

The star which the alien planet orbits is super hot — more than 2000 degrees hotter than the Sun — so it carries a bluish hue. CHEOPS’ observations show that it is not perfectly round and is larger and cooler at its equator than at its poles. 

“Only a handful of planets are known to exist around stars this hot, and this system is by far the brightest,” says Monika Lendl, an astrophysicist at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

“WASP-189b is also the brightest hot Jupiter that we can observe as it passes in front of or behind its star, making the whole system really intriguing.”

Unlike Earth’s solar system, where planets orbit at the sun’s equator, WASP-189b orbits its star in such a dramatic tilt that it brings it closer to the star’s poles. This characteristic makes scientists suspect that WASP-189b formed somewhere far away from the

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Stunning images from Hubble, Chandra, and more reveal value of space telescope teamwork

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What do you get when you put a space telescope to work with another space telescope or two? Amazing compilation images of our universe.

NASA recently highlighted some collaborations between its Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, particularly the Hubble Space Telescope, showing what sorts of images can be produced when you look at the same object in different wavelengths of light.

Gallery: Amazing nebula photos from Chandra & Hubble

M82

(Image credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy M82 can be seen edge-on from Earth, allowing scientists a great perspective whenever star formation occurs, since there is little to block our view. Chandra observations, visible in blue and pink, show bursts of high temperatures created when gas is heated by supernova explosions. The Hubble Space Telescope’s optical images (shown in red and orange) reveal the galaxy’s shape.

Abell 2744

(Image credit: NASA/CXC; Optical: NASA/STScI)

The galaxy cluster Abell 2744 includes a lot of superheated gas that glows brightly in X-rays. The X-rays are seen in Chandra data as blue clouds, juxtaposed with the optical light detected by Hubble and shown in red, green and blue. Galaxy clusters are enormous collections of galaxies held together by gravity, and these behemoths teach astronomers about the structure of the universe.

Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A)

(Image credit: Radio: ALMA/ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/P. Cigan/R. Indebetouw/NRAO/AUI/NSF/B. Saxton; X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/PSU/K. Frank et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI)

A supernova explosion that occurred on Feb. 24, 1987, is still producing valuable scientific data a generation later. Telescopes regularly revisit Supernova 1987A to see how its gas and dust morph over the years. Chandra data (in blue) show the shockwave of the supernova hitting a shell roughly four light-years in diameter of material surrounding the exploded star. Hubble’s view also shows some of the interaction in optical wavelengths, shown here in