Rights

0

Journalism student sues ASU, citing free speech rights

Posted on

CLOSE

ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in downtown Phoenix. (Photo: The Republic)

An Arizona State University journalism student is suing the school after she says she was removed from leading the student-run radio station over a controversial tweet.

The lawsuit claims that the university violated Rae’Lee Klein’s First Amendment rights to free expression by refusing to allow her to continue as station manager of Blaze Radio because of her tweet.

The university, in a statement to The Arizona Republic on Tuesday, refuted that claim, saying, “Klein’s conduct in the aftermath of the tweet — rather than the tweet itself — meant that she was no longer able to perform the job for which she was hired.”

But Klein said she was first scolded about her tweet and later scolded for her media appearances and conversations with elected officials as her situation gained attention. 

“They were first upset by my free speech and now they’re upset that I’ve become this cause célèbre for free speech, so it’s just disappointing to see them keep taking the same stance and not want to work or correct the situation,” Klein told The Republic. 

Jack Wilenchik, Klein’s attorney, filed the complaint in U.S. District Court on Monday against ASU, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication and Kristin Gilger, Cronkite interim dean.

Klein faced swift backlash from within and outside her radio station after a tweet she posted in the aftermath of police shooting Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Aug. 23. Klein shared a New York Post article with graphic details from a police report accusing Blake of sexual assault.

The Aug. 29 tweet, deleted later, was captioned, “Always more to the story, folks. Please read this article to get the background of Jacob Blake’s warrant. You’ll be

0

Phyllis Landrieu, tireless advocate for education and children’s rights, dies at 86 | News

Posted on

Phyllis Landrieu, a businesswoman and activist whose causes included health care, education and the rights of children — along with a healthy dose of politics — died Saturday at Touro Infirmary. She was 86.

The cause of death has not been determined, her daughter Judy Landrieu Klein said.

Landrieu was “a woman of steel,” New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement, describing Landrieu as “a passionate champion for our children and for early childhood education.”

The mother of 10 children, Landrieu was an unstinting advocate of early childhood education and children’s health. She also founded her own public-relations agency and was active in politics, serving as the first woman leader of the Louisiana Democratic State Central Committee and a member of the Democratic National Committee. She was a friend of Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama.

“She was just an amazing bundle of joy and had a special force about her, but it was a joyful force,” former U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, a niece, said. “She approached everything with passion and vigor and energy.”

Landrieu became a passionate advocate for children’s well-being after the deaths of her sons Stephen and Scott, Klein said, explaining that her mother took on that cause as a way to work through her grief. Her work resulted in the creation of the Health and Education Alliance of Louisiana; she was its founding president.

Calling her work with that organization “an opportunity out of the darkness,” Landrieu wrote: “If I could relieve some child’s suffering, I could relieve some … of mine. Little by little, it worked. Every day, I keep moving in the direction of the children. There are so many children suffering, as I am, with pain and disappointment. In helping them, I am helping myself.”

“She was not exempt

0

VelocityEHS Obtains Exclusive Rights to University of Michigan 3D Software to Optimize Its …

Posted on

CHICAGO, Oct. 07, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — VelocityEHS, the global leader in cloud-based environment, health, safety (EHS) and sustainability solutions, today announced it has secured exclusive rights to sell and support the 3D Static Strength Prediction Program™ (3D SSPP™), an ergonomics job analysis and design tool developed by the University of Michigan Center for Ergonomics that quantifies biomechanical requirements during manual materials handling tasks. Based on over 50 years of research by the Center for Ergonomics, the software helps users analyze the biomechanical and static strength capabilities of employees in relation to the physical demands of the work environment to develop methods that prevent the risks that lead to musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs). Together with VelocityEHS’ Humantech Ergonomics Solutions, the software further enhances how organizations can use the science of ergonomics to lower risk of injuries and improve workplace performance.

According to the 2019 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index, overexertion—which includes lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling, and carrying—is the top cause of non-fatal workplace injuries in the United States, accounting for 23 percent of all non-fatal workplace injuries and $13.11 billion in direct costs per year.

“Providing solutions that incorporate the Michigan 3D SSPP technology is just one more way VelocityEHS is defining the industry through workplace ergonomics,” said James Mallon, President of VelocityEHS’ Humantech. “By giving companies cutting-edge technology coupled with proven methods, their ergonomics improvement processes gain efficiency and help them focus on designing a better workplace. Now, with 3D SSPP, we offer the most comprehensive suite of assessment tools in the marketplace, furthering our drive to improve the lives of the working population.”

Developed by Don Chaffin, the Richard G Snyder Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Industrial Operations and Engineering and founder of the Center for Ergonomics at the University of Michigan, the 3D SSPP software predicts static

0

Michigan Civil Rights commission calls for statewide education equity plan

Posted on

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission is calling for the creation of a statewide educational equity plan to improve policies, accountability and opportunities for students.

The commission, charged with investigating alleged discrimination, issued a 62-page report on Wednesday after its year-long investigation into equity in K-12 education in Michigan. It met Wednesday to release the report, which can be found here.

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission is calling for the creation of a statewide educational equity plan to improve policies, accountability and opportunities for students. (Photo: Detroit News file)

“This Commission believes that an adequate education is the key to unlocking a lifetime of opportunities and also is a basic civil right,” said Stacie Clayton, the commission’s chair. “We learned during our education hearings that not all children receive the kind of education they deserve as their birthright.

“We urge policy makers, educators and other stakeholders across the state to view this report as a roadmap they can follow to help schools achieve educational equity and give all Michigan children — regardless of household income, race, residency or ability — the education they need to lead productive and fulfilling lives.”

The report was spurred when the commission investigated the root causes of the Flint water crisis and found educational inequities in Flint’s K-12 school system. To “determine the size and scope of the inequities across schools and districts,” it launched hearings throughout the state in 2018 and 2019 in Detroit, Grand Rapids, Ypsilanti and Clinton Township, listening to educators, students, parents and others talk about the challenges in the state’s fragmented education system.

Through those hearings, the commission said, the problem observed with the state’s education system was a lack of a single system and instead hundreds of independent systems all resourced differently. 

“This type of patchwork system has led to

0

Report finds ‘significant lack of equity’ in K-12 education, Michigan Civil Rights Commission says

Posted on

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission released a 62-page report Wednesday, Sept. 30, describing inequities in Michigan’s K-12 education system. The report also detailed recommendations for policy makers and educators to implement to make achieving educational equity a priority in all Michigan schools.

The adoption of the report passed unanimously at a Wednesday Michigan Civil Rights Commission meeting.

Stacie Clayton, Chair of the Michigan Civil Rights Commission, said the report revealed a “significant lack of equity” in Michigan’s K-12 education system.

“This Commission believes that an adequate education is the key to unlocking a lifetime of opportunities and also is a basic civil right,” Clayton said. “We learned during our education hearings that not all children receive the kind of education they deserve as their birthright. We urge policy makers, educators and other stakeholders across the state to view this report as a roadmap they can follow to help schools achieve educational equity and give all Michigan children – regardless of household income, race, residency or ability — the education they need to lead productive and fulfilling lives.”

The report is the culmination of a series of public hearings and a year-long examination of disparities in K-12 education in Michigan. From May 2018 through the end of March 2019, the Commission held five public hearings around the state and heard from dozens of subject matter experts, school administrators, teachers, parents and students on the ways Michigan is falling short in its obligation to effectively educate all its children.

The Commission became increasingly concerned about educational disparities in 2016 during their examination of the racial implications in the causes of, and response to, the Flint water crisis, according to a Wednesday news release. The decision in 2018 to launch an exploration of inequity into Michigan’s education system came after learning about the