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Utah COVID Cases Rise, University Hospital ICU at 95 Percent Capacity

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The intensive care unit at the University of Utah Health hospital has reached 95 percent capacity, according to Dr. Emily Spivak, associate professor of medicine, division of infectious diseases at the university.



Employees at Spectrum Solutions assembling COVID-19 saliva test kits on September 21 in Draper, Utah. The intensive care unit (ICU) at the University of Utah Health hospital was reported to have reached 95 percent on Thursday, while average daily new cases across the state were on an upward trend in the past two weeks.


© George Frey/Getty Images
Employees at Spectrum Solutions assembling COVID-19 saliva test kits on September 21 in Draper, Utah. The intensive care unit (ICU) at the University of Utah Health hospital was reported to have reached 95 percent on Thursday, while average daily new cases across the state were on an upward trend in the past two weeks.

The hospital provides care for residents in Utah as well as “residents of five surrounding states in a referral area encompassing more than 10 percent of the continental U.S.,” according to its LinkedIn profile.

Speaking at the state’s weekly press conference on Thursday, Dr. Spivak said: “Our hospital is getting full. Our ICU is getting full. It was 95 percent full this morning.”

“As a physician, as a mother and a concerned citizen, I plead with you, wear a mask at all times out of your home.”

The chief executive officer at the University of Utah Health, Dr. Michael Good, said at a Tuesday briefing: “We began in early September seeing this dramatic increase in the number of new coronavirus cases reported each day.

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“Hospital trends across the state, and here at University Hospital, [are] showing increasing hospitalization for coronavirus.

“The increase in the number of deaths is just now starting to turn up…unfortunately, the hospitalization, as measured by the number of people in the hospital, continues to increase.

“Fortunately, we’ve seen a little bit of a leveling off in those that are in the ICU. So, there still is this general trend upward, but with a

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Ice melt projections may underestimate Antarctic contribution to sea level rise

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Ice melt projections may underestimate Antarctic contribution to sea level rise
Thwaites Glacier, Antarctica, pictured in 2019. Credit: NASA

Fluctuations in the weather can have a significant impact on melting Antarctic ice, and models that do not include this factor can underestimate the global impact of sea level rise, according to Penn State scientists.


“We know ice sheets are melting as global temperatures increase, but uncertainties remain about how much and how fast that will happen,” said Chris Forest, professor of climate dynamics at Penn State. “Our findings shed new light on one area of uncertainty, suggesting climate variability has a significant impact on melting ice sheets and sea level rise.”

While it is understood that continued warming may cause rapid ice loss, models that predict how Antarctica will respond to climate change have not included the potential impacts of internal climate variability, like yearly and decadal fluctuations in the climate, the team of scientists said.

Accounting for climate variability caused models to predict an additional 2.7 to 4.3 inches—7 to 11 centimeters—of sea level rise by 2100, the scientists recently reported in the journal Climate Dynamics. The models projected roughly 10.6 to 14.9 inches—27 to 38 centimeters—of sea level rise during that same period without climate variability.

“That increase alone is comparable to the amount of sea level rise we have seen over the last few decades,” said Forest, who has appointments in the departments of meteorology and atmospheric science and geosciences. “Every bit adds on to the storm surge, which we expect to see during hurricanes and other severe weather events, and the results can be devastating.”

The Antarctic ice sheet is a complex system, and modeling how it will evolve under future climate conditions requires thousands of simulations and large amounts of computing power. Because of this, modelers test how the ice will respond using a mean

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From Stanford to NWSL, Sophia Smith’s career on the rise

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PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland Thorns rookie Sophia Smith laughs when she recalls the conversation with her dad back in high school about her blossoming soccer career.

The No. 1 pick in the National Women’s Soccer League draft out of Stanford and U.S. national-team prospect comes from a family of basketball players — and it was just assumed she’d head in the same direction.


But no.

“I think he quietly knew that I liked soccer more. But when I had to finally decide and just kind of cut basketball out for good, it was a tough few months, but we got over it,” she said. “He loves soccer now.”

Turned out Smith was right to choose soccer. It paved her way to Stanford and a national title in December, and now to a blossoming career in the NWSL.



Smith did not play in the NWSL’s Challenge Cup tournament in Utah this summer because of an injury, but in her first match as a professional this month, she entered as a substitute and scored against the Utah Royals.

Although it wasn’t official — the league’s fall series games, a chance for teams to get in some games amid the pandemic, don’t count — it was a good indication of Smith’s promise. And it wasn’t the first time she scored in a debut: She scored 17 minutes into her first game as a freshman at Stanford.


Smith grew up in Colorado. Dad Kenny Smith played basketball at Wyoming and sister Savannah is the all-time career scoring leader for Northern Colorado.

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How, When And Where You Can See A Magical ‘Harvest Moon’ Rise This Week

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The “Harvest Moon” is usually in September, but due to a quirk in the calendar, it’s occurring this coming Thursday, October 1, 2020. 

The Harvest Moon is one of the most famous full Moons of the year, but is there anything special about this full Moon compared to the one before (the Corn Moon) or after (the Halloween Hunter’s Blue Moon)? 

All will be explained, though most importantly, we’ll learn exactly when to be outside looking up this week—and in what direction you need to look—to see the Harvest Moon looking its very best. 

So here’s everything you need to know about seeing the Harvest Moon usher-in October—and a season of awesome moongazing. 

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Why the ‘Harvest Moon’ is in the ‘wrong’ month

Normally the Harvest Moon is in September, but not this year. “The Harvest Moon is the name given to the full Moon closest to the equinox each September—the autumnal equinox in the northern hemisphere and the first day of spring in the southern hemisphere,” explains Tom Kerss, a British astronomy and science communicator who hosts the weekly Star Signs: Go Stargazing! podcast. “That occurred in late September, and normally that month’s full Moon occurs within the two weeks before, but this year it’s October’s full Moon that will fall closer to the equinox.” 

So rather unusually it’s October’s full Moon that this year takes on the role of the Harvest Moon. 

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It will be officially