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Tech Employment Data Contradict Need For Quick H-1B Visa Rules

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New government data show the low unemployment rate in computer occupations contradicts Trump administration claims an economic emergency requires the quick implementation of new H-1B visa rules. A new analysis indicates the government’s own data do not support the claims made in the regulations, which makes it more likely federal courts will block the new rules.

On October 8, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published “interim final” rules to restrict H-1B visas, asserting a “good cause” exception to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) to allow the H-1B rules to go into effect quickly without permitting the public to comment. DOL and DHS cited an emergency need to address unemployment as a reason for bypassing the normal rulemaking process.

Low Unemployment Rate in Computer Occupations: “The U.S. unemployment rate for individuals in computer occupations stood at 3.5% in September 2020, not changed significantly from the 3% unemployment rate in January 2020 (before the pandemic spread in the U.S.),” according to an analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey by the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP). “A similar measure of the U.S. unemployment rate in computer and mathematical occupations, which appears on the BLS website, also found a rate of 3% in January 2020 and 3.5% in September 2020. The rates are well below the unemployment rate of 7.8% for non-computer occupations.”

Approximately two-thirds of H-1B visa holders work in computer-related occupations, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), but the DHS and DOL rules spend much time citing the

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Miami QB D’Eriq King has taken full advantage of transfer rules

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He committed to one school (TCU) way back in 2015, then fashionably de-committed.

He committed to another school (Houston) as it fashionably touted its 2016 recruiting class.

He saw the head coach (Tom Herman) leave after one season, which was pretty fashionable.

He (King) proved fashionably versatile in a sport (among other sports) becoming more position-less.

He played two years for another coach (Major Applewhite), who got fired with fashionable haste.

Come late September 2019, he (King) ventured to the fashion vanguard, accepting his third coach’s advice to follow a new redshirt rule.

Come January 2020, he entered the fashionable transfer portal, announcing it fashionably by tweet during the national championship game.

In winter 2020, he transferred, the foremost fashion.

“Just playing with these guys for the first few weeks and getting a bye week, I think I have a better feel for what guys are good at,” he said this week in Miami’s media sessions. The quotation told of a quick-study necessity that, too, is fashionable.

So start with the transfer and work back.

Transfers grip the game as never before, their stigmas deceased and their pathways ever less cluttered. In the 2019-20 College Football Playoff, three of the four starting quarterbacks had transferred from other major programs, leaving 2021 NFL No. 1 pick Trevor Lawrence as the only one of the four as a one-school throwback.

When LSU quarterback Joe Burrow stood in New York in December 2019 to accept the Heisman Trophy, that made it three straight Heisman winners who had transferred from one FBS program to another. Among the 82 Heisman winners before that, only two had transferred from another major school, Cam Newton (2010) and Felix “Doc” Blanchard (1945), the latter switching from North Carolina to Army after he signed up for the Army during

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Fraternity at Boston University sanctions some of its members for attending party with no COVID-19 safety rules

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Some Phi Chi Theta members at Boston University have been suspended by their fraternity after an Instagram posting showed them attending a social gathering where COVID-19 guidelines were not followed, the fraternity said on its website.

Phi Chi Theta is a co-ed fraternity associated with Boston University and its business education programming. The event was not sponsored by Phi Chi Theta, but several fraternity members attended, the fraternity said.

“As you may know, there was a video circulating about a gathering that had members of this organization involved,” the organization said in a statement posted on its webpage. “We have taken appropriate steps to ensure this situation does not ever happen again and have suspended these members from PCT activities.”

The fraternity, which is mixed gender, distanced itself from those who attended. “We’re aware of how serious this problem is, and we do not condone our members’ choices, the posting reads, with the final phrase in bold. “Please understand that these behaviors are not representative of our values or the majority sentiment of our members.

According to The Daily Free Press, the student-run independent newspaper, BU administrators have placed the fraternity on “probation” and that 15 students were shown on the video gathering with fraternity alumnae.

The video has since been taken down, the Free Press reported.


John R. Ellement can be reached at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @JREbosglobe.

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E.U. Court Rules Against Hungary Law Targeting Soros-Funded University

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BUDAPEST — The European Court of Justice ruled on Tuesday that Hungary had violated E.U. rules by changing legislation in 2017 that effectively expelled an American university founded by the billionaire financier George Soros from the country.

“The conditions introduced by Hungary to enable foreign higher education institutions to carry out their activities in its territory are incompatible with E.U. law,” the court’s ruling said.

The decision was the latest effort by the European Union to curb growing authoritarianism by the government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban, but is unlikely to have much impact on the ground in Hungary.

The ruling leaves no room for appeal, and requires Mr. Orban’s government to change the legislation to come in line with E.U. laws. If Hungary does not amend the law, the European Commission, the bloc’s executive arm, could request that the high court impose fines on the Hungarian government until it does so.

But the expelled institution, Central European University, is unlikely to restore its former setup in Hungary. Michael Ignatieff, the university’s rector, has said that it will be anchored in Vienna, where it has moved the bulk of its operations.

“We cannot return to Hungary, because its prevailing laws don’t meet the requirements of academic freedom,” Mr. Soros said in a statement on Tuesday. “The Hungarian government continues to trample E.U. law, with the latest victim being the world-renowned University of Theatre and Arts,” he added, referring to a Hungarian university that was the site of student protests last months over the increasing influence of Mr. Orban’s government in the school’s affairs.

Andras Lederer, a program coordinator with the Hungarian Helsinki Committee, a human rights organization in Budapest, said the Central European University case highlighted the need for the European Commission to step in early and suspend legislation it

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EU court rules against Hungary’s Orban over Soros university

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BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union’s highest court ruled Tuesday that changes by Hungary to its law on higher education which effectively forced a university founded by George Soros to leave the country were not in line with EU law.



Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban arrives for an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. European Union leaders will be assessing relations with China during their final day of a summit meeting which already saw bruising talks on foreign affairs issues. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool)


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Hungary’s Prime Minister Viktor Orban arrives for an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. European Union leaders will be assessing relations with China during their final day of a summit meeting which already saw bruising talks on foreign affairs issues. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys, Pool)

The European Court of Justice ruled against Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s governing, saying in the ruling that “the conditions introduced by Hungary to enable foreign higher education institutions to carry out their activities in its territory are incompatible with EU law.”

Among the changes, Hungary tied the operation of foreign universities in Hungary to a bilateral agreement between the Hungarian government and the universities’ country of origin. Foreign universities were also compelled to carry out educational activities in their home countries.

The court ruled that by imposing such conditions, “Hungary has failed to comply with the commitments” under the framework of the World Trade Organisation and acted in contravention of the provisions of the EU’s Charter of Fundamental Rights.

At the heart of the conflict is the fate of Central European University, established in New York state by Soros, a Hungarian-American financier. Under pressure from Orban, it had to relocate most of its main activities to Vienna from Budapest, where it had been operating since the early 1990s.

Orban has been a vocal critic of Soros for years, arguing that the billionaire philanthropist is intent on undermining European values with his liberal views on migration, claims Soros has denied. Orban’s ideological aim of creating

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