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Education Secretary confirms exams WILL go ahead next summer

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Gavin Williamson in a suit holding a flower: MailOnline logo


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Most A-level and GCSE exams in England will be delayed by three weeks next year to allow pupils to catch up on time lost to pandemic closures, Gavin Williamson  confirmed today.

The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would ‘support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time’.

Most exams will take place between June 7 and July 2, but Mr Williamson also said that one maths and one English GCSE exam will take place before the May half-term, to allow pupils forced to self-isolate during the main exam period a chance to sit a paper in a core subject. 

In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next summer to be scrapped or postponed for longer, as had been called for by some teaching unions.

They warned last week that moving the timing of exams back slightly was unlikely to make any significant difference to the varied learning experiences students have had this year. 

‘We know that exams are the fairest way of measuring a student’s abilities and accomplishments, including the most disadvantaged,’ Mr Williamson said.

‘We want to give our young people the opportunity next summer to demonstrate what they know and can do.’



Gavin Williamson standing in front of a building: The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would 'support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time'


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The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would ‘support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time’



a group of people lying on the floor: In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next summer to be scrapped or postponed for longer, as had been called for by some teaching unions


© Provided by Daily Mail
In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next summer to be scrapped or postponed for longer, as had been called for by some teaching unions

Results days for AS/A levels and GCSEs will fall on Tuesday 24 August and

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Education Secretary Gavin Williamson confirms GCSE and A-Level exams WILL go ahead next summer

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Education Secretary Gavin Williamson confirms GCSE and A-Level exams WILL go ahead but be delayed by three weeks next summer amid fears over lost class time for pupils

Most A-level and GCSE exams in England will be delayed by three weeks next year to allow pupils to catch up on time lost to pandemic closures, Gavin Williamson  confirmed today.

The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would ‘support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time’.

Most exams will take place between June 7 and July 2, but Mr Williamson also said that one maths and one English GCSE exam will take place before the May half-term, to allow pupils forced to self-isolate during the main exam period a chance to sit a paper in a core subject. 

In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next summer to be scrapped or postponed for longer, as had been called for by some teaching unions.

They warned last week that moving the timing of exams back slightly was unlikely to make any significant difference to the varied learning experiences students have had this year. 

‘We know that exams are the fairest way of measuring a student’s abilities and accomplishments, including the most disadvantaged,’ Mr Williamson said.

‘We want to give our young people the opportunity next summer to demonstrate what they know and can do.’

The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would 'support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time'

The Education Secretary also outlined plans to streamline some subjects saying it would ‘support teachers and students by freeing up valuable teaching time’

In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next summer to be scrapped or postponed for longer, as had been called for by some teaching unions

In a written ministerial statement today, Mr Williamson confirmed that he had rejected calls for the exams next

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Joseph M. Cronin, first Massachusetts secretary of education, dies at 85

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“In order to really give poor people in the inner city a chance to compete,” he told the Globe, “we will have to spend more on their education than on the average child in other communities.”

Dr. Cronin, who in his long, multifaceted career as an educator had also served as president of what is now Bentley University, died Saturday in the Pat Roche Hospice Home in Hingham of progressive supranuclear palsy. He was 85 and had lived in Milton for many years.

As he prepared to retire in 1997 from leading what was then Bentley College, he received a letter from nearly 20 colleagues who signed themselves as “the faculty and staff of color.”

“Under your leadership diversity has become a business imperative for the college,” they wrote. “Your leadership in diversity has resulted in many of us joining the Bentley community.”

When Dr. Cronin first arrived in 1991 to serve as president, he stressed that he wanted the college to prepare graduates to be global thinkers ready for careers anywhere in the world.

“Businesses want people who are versatile, who can go, say, to Zimbabwe for a week on a special assignment, and they had better have had courses in government and history to absorb this,” Dr. Cronin told the Globe. “We want them to be ready.”

As Massachusetts secretary of education in the early 1970s, he played a key role in implementing Chapter 766, the state’s special education law that became a model for legislation in other states.

Dr. Cronin also was credited with increasing state support of the arts and humanities in public education, from $250,000 to $2.5 million

He served as state secretary of education for three years before leaving to become superintendent of schools in Illinois. As with the education secretary post, he was

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Former Obama education secretary forms political group

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — A former U.S. education secretary and potential candidate for governor of Maryland in 2022 announced a new political group in the state on Monday that includes other alumni of former President Barack Obama’s administration.



FILE  - In this Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, then-Education Secretary John King Jr. speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington. John King, Jr., who served as U.S. education secretary in former President Barack Obama’s administration, announced Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, he is forming a political nonprofit organization called Strong Future Maryland to focus on battling systemic racism. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)


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FILE – In this Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016, file photo, then-Education Secretary John King Jr. speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington. John King, Jr., who served as U.S. education secretary in former President Barack Obama’s administration, announced Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, he is forming a political nonprofit organization called Strong Future Maryland to focus on battling systemic racism. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

John King, Jr., who served as Obama’s education secretary in the last year of his presidency, said Strong Future Maryland will focus on helping Maryland recover from the coronavirus pandemic and battling systemic racism.

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King also said the group will focus on advancing action to fight climate change.

“This effort is really one to try to put some additional wind in the sail of progressive policy change in the legislature,” King, who lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, said in an interview Monday.

King said he has raised more than $1 million to fund the organization.

Strong Future Maryland will include other former officials in the Obama administration, including Denis McDonough, who was the former president’s chief of staff, and Cecilia Munoz, Obama’s former domestic policy adviser.

Democrats control the Maryland General Assembly. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan is term-limited, so the governor’s office will be open in 2022.

While King said the new organization’s aims were on advancing long-term goals beyond a single election, he said it’s fair to say he’s not ruling out a gubernatorial bid.

“It’s really about long-term structural change that will create a more just,