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University of Bridgeport’s just released 2018-19 finances show a ship in distress

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BRIDGEPORT — The University of Bridgeport spent $8.3 million more than it made in the 2018-19 fiscal year and burned through $8.7 million of its modest endowment, according to a fiscal filing by the university recently made public.

The federal Internal Revenue Service documents released late last month shows that UB ended the fiscal year in June 2019 with a $25.2 million endowment. Two years prior, its endowment was at $37 million, its highest level in decades.

The 2018-19 fiscal year was the first and only full year of former UB President Laura Trombley’s tenure. She left in April, having served 18 months.

Just before her departure, Trombley sent an email to the university community on March 30 saying the university anticipated an operating deficit in the 2019-20 fiscal year of approximately $12.5 million. The filing for that year has not yet been released.

If the expected losses held true, it likely would have cut the university’s $25 million endowment in half.

At the time, Trombley said the loss came despite efforts to renegotiate vendor contracts, reduce the campus footprint and close buildings.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, UB laid off 33 employees and furloughed 93 others, according to Trombley. Other staff took pay cuts.

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“To accomplish our goal of a non-deficit budget by the end of the academic year 2021, we will continue to decrease costs and grow revenues,” Trombley wrote in the March email.

Three days later, Trombley was introduced as the new president of Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas.

Acting UB President Stephen Healey, who was provost during Trombley’s tenure, said Friday he was willing to speak about the IRS form, but then reneged to prepare for a Board of Trustees meeting, he said. On Monday, he said he, along with UB’s chief financial officer

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Mars set for close approach to Earth Tuesday, and you can see the show

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nasamars

Mars will bright and beautiful in the October 2020 night sky.


NASA

Forget Halloween. This October is all about the glory of Mars, as the glimmering red planet puts on a show in the night sky. You can enjoy Mars as a bright point of light all month long, but there are two special dates to mark on your calendar: Oct. 6 when the planet makes a close approach to Earth, and Oct. 13, when it will be in opposition. 

Spotting Mars

Mars has a reputation as the “red” planet, but its color in the night sky is a little more on the Halloween side of the spectrum. It appears as a bright orange-red dot to the naked eye, like a little spot of glittering rust.

Mars’ distinctive color is one clue you’ve found it in the dark. Look to the eastern sky to catch it rising at night. This is a great time for viewing the planet, partly because spotting it is so simple. It should be visible for most of the night. As NASA says, “Simply go outside and look up and, depending on your local weather and lighting conditions, you should be able to see Mars.”

Check out our list of stargazing apps if you want some extra help with locating the planet.

Close approach: Oct. 6

Tuesday, Oct. 6 marks the close approach of Mars to Earth. This would be a great time to grab a telescope and get a little better look. Give a wave to NASA’s Perseverance rover while you’re at it. The vehicle is on track to reach the planet in February 2021. 

NASA shared an artist’s view of of the Tuesday, Oct. 6 close approach compared

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Mars set for close approach to Earth this week, and you can see the show

Posted on

nasamars

Mars will bright and beautiful in the October 2020 night sky.


NASA

Forget Halloween. This October is all about the glory of Mars, as the glimmering red planet puts on a show in the night sky. You can enjoy Mars as a bright point of light all month long, but there are two special dates to mark on your calendar: Oct. 6 when the planet makes a close approach to Earth, and Oct. 13, when it will be in opposition. 

Spotting Mars

Mars has a reputation as the “red” planet, but its color in the night sky is a little more on the Halloween side of the spectrum. It appears as a bright orange-red dot to the naked eye, like a little spot of glittering rust.

Mars’ distinctive color is one clue you’ve found it in the dark. Look to the eastern sky to catch it rising at night. This is a great time for viewing the planet, partly because spotting it is so simple. It should be visible for most of the night. As NASA says, “Simply go outside and look up and, depending on your local weather and lighting conditions, you should be able to see Mars.”

Check out our list of stargazing apps if you want some extra help with locating the planet.

Close approach: Oct. 6

Tuesday, Oct. 6 marks the close approach of Mars to Earth. This would be a great time to grab a telescope and get a little better look. Give a wave to NASA’s Perseverance rover while you’re at it. The vehicle is on track to reach the planet in February 2021. 

NASA shared an artist’s view of of the Tuesday, Oct. 6 close approach compared