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Cleveland bans parking on several streets around Cleveland Clinic presidential debate site, University Circle and downtown

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CLEVELAND, Ohio – Cleveland has banned parking on several streets as part of security preparations for Tuesday’s presidential debate.



Cleveland has banned parking on several streets as part of security preparations for Tuesday s presidential debate. The affected streets are near potential protest sites -- areas around the Cleveland Clinic campus, in and around Case Western Reserve University and in the downtown.


© Lisa DeJong/Lisa DeJong/The Plain Dealer/cleveland.com/TNS
Cleveland has banned parking on several streets as part of security preparations for Tuesday s presidential debate. The affected streets are near potential protest sites — areas around the Cleveland Clinic campus, in and around Case Western Reserve University and in the downtown.

The ban took effect Monday and will be in place until 6 a.m. Wednesday. The affected streets are near potential protest sites — areas around the Cleveland Clinic campus, in and around Case Western Reserve University and in the downtown.

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The ban is in place on the following streets around the Cleveland Clinic, where the debate will be held, and in the adjacent University Circle area:

East 89th Street from Carnegie Avenue south to Cedar Avenue and then south of Cedar for about 350 feet.1/4 n

East 90th, East 93rd, East 95th, East 97th and East 100th streets from Cedar south about 350 feet.1/4 n

East 101st and East 103rd streets south from Cedar to Wain Court.1/4 n

Euclid Avenue from East Boulevard through the Case Western Reserve University campus to East 118th Street.1/4 n

Juniper Road from East Boulevard to East 115th Street.1/4 n

Wade Oval from East Boulevard to East 108th Street.1/4 n

Sterns Road from Euclid Avenue south to Cedar.1/4 n

Cedar Avenue from E. 89th Street to E. 105th Street 1/4 n

East Boulevard from Jeptha Drive to Euclid.1/4 n

Martin L. King Boulevard from Chester to Jeptha.1/4 n

Bellflower Road from East Boulevard to East 115th.1/4 n

Circle Drive between Adelbert and Cornell roads.1/4 n

Wade Park Avenue from Ansel Avenue to East 118th Street.1/4 n

Deering Avenue from Stokes to Sterns.1/4 n

East 101

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Conservancy builds a place for community, learning on site of former Marygrove College

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A beloved Detroit college campus that was once bustling with students is now the home of a business advancement program and youth education. 

Marygrove Conservancy becomes training hub for education, businesses, nonprofits

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Marygrove Conservancy, a nonprofit, stepped in  after Marygrove College abruptly closed in December 2019  to keep the campus operating with multiple educational resources for people of all ages. 

The conservancy has a goal to help businesses, startups and nonprofits gain the knowledge and resources they need to grow in the community, said Racheal Allen, COO of the conservancy.

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Collaboration is encouraged among all of the businesses and nonprofits at the campus located near the Fitzgerald neighborhood.

“In a time where we are more isolated and separated because of COVID, a lot of our business owners and nonprofits were seeking a community where they didn’t necessarily have to work in isolation,” said Allen. “We’re up to about 30 organizations who are tenants now at the Marygrove Conservancy.” 



Rebecca Thompson standing in front of a building: Racheal Allen Chief Operating Officer of Marygrove Conservancy poses for a photo on the campus in Detroit on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. The program will bring several students to the educational campus and they are also helping nonprofits to grow their organizations.


© Ryan Garza, Detroit Free Press
Racheal Allen Chief Operating Officer of Marygrove Conservancy poses for a photo on the campus in Detroit on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. The program will bring several students to the educational campus and they are also helping nonprofits to grow their organizations.

The conservancy started the P-20 Cradle-to-Career Campus in November 2019. The end goal is to provide educational opportunities for students of preschool age up until 12th grade. Eventually, about 1,000 students will be supported on the campus. 



a man standing in a room: STEM Genius founder Yul Allen (right) directs Xavier Gray (left) and Tony Wilson as they move a table into an engineering design studio while working to create his area for STEM Genius in the Madame Cadillac Hall on the Marygrove Conservancy campus in Detroit on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020. Allen's program is to inspire kids in the field of STEM integrating science technology, engineering and mathematics with cutting-edge project based learning programs designed to enrich curriculum. "If I can get kids to love to learn math and science then they're going to do better on the SAT and ACT and more of them are going to go to college, trade schools and they'll do better," said Allen who includes the use of robotics, chess and urban farming in the learning process.


© Ryan Garza, Detroit Free Press
STEM Genius founder Yul Allen (right) directs Xavier Gray (left) and Tony Wilson as they move a table into an engineering design studio while working to create his area for STEM