0

South Bay teen author shares love of coding through books

Posted on

In “The Code Detectives,” two middle school girls who love coding use artificial intelligence to solve mysteries. For 17-year-old author Ria Doshi, writing the book series is a way to advocate for increasing diversity within the technology field.

“I’ve brought a diverse cast of characters to life, with the series centering around Ramona Diaz, a powerful young girl of color,” says Ria, a student at Cupertino’s Monta Vista High School. “The book series gives young girls strong, fictional role models in technology and AI, and introduces them to AI topics in a compelling way, clearing common misconceptions.”

Ria writes what shoe knows, and vice versa. She is the founder of CodeBuddies, which uses workshops, panels, challenges and more to promote problem-solving through technology. She is also the founder of Monta Vista’s Women in AI club, where she teaches girls the impact of artificial intelligence in daily life.

Her work has earned her international recognition. She was part of the U.S. Championship team that developed an app for the Technovation Challenge, a competition for girls ages 10-18 to develop mobile apps that address real-world problems. The app, Alleviate, helps individuals with autism overcome challenges they face using speech recognition.

Recently, Ria was named a 24 under 24 Global Leader in STEM by the Mars Generation (TMG), a nonprofit founded in 2015 by then 18-year-old Abigail Harrison to excite kids and adults about space and STEM/STEAM education. Nominees must be members of TMG’s Student Space Ambassador Leadership Program, through which they agree to share their passion for same.

Ria’s excitement for artificial intelligence and computer science started in ninth grade, when she participated in the Stanford AI4ALL program researching cancerous genes using machine learning. Her stated goal is to learn as much as she can about artificial intelligence through real-world research projects,

0

Nearly Half of South America’s Mammals Came from North America, New Research May Explain Why | Smart News

Posted on

North and South America haven’t always been connected. South America functioned as a continent-sized island for millions of years following the extinction of the dinosaurs, incubating its own strange assembly of animals such as giant ground sloths, massive armored mammals akin to armadillos and saber-toothed marsupial carnivores. Meanwhile, North America was exchanging animals with Asia, populating it with the ancestors of modern horses, camels and cats, writes Asher Elbein for the New York Times.

Finally, when tectonic activity formed the Isthmus of Panama roughly ten million years ago, a massive biological exchange took place. The many species that had been evolving in isolation from one another on both continents began migrating across the narrow new land bridge. Llamas, raccoons, wolves and bears trekked south, while armadillos, possums and porcupines went north.

It would be reasonable to expect this grand biological and geological event, known to paleontologists as the Great American Biotic Interchange, resulted in equal numbers of northern and southern species spreading across the two land masses; but that’s not what happened.

Instead, many more North American mammal species made homes down south than the other way around. Almost half of living South American mammals have North American evolutionary roots, whereas only around ten percent of North American mammals once hailed from South America. Now, researchers who reviewed some 20,000 fossils may have an answer, according to the Times.

According to the paper, published this week in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the asymmetry of immigrant mammal diversity we see today was the result of droves of South American mammals going extinct, leaving gaping ecological holes waiting to be filled by northern species and reducing the pool of potential immigrant species to make the trek north, reports Christine Janis, an ecologist at

0

Climate patterns linked in Amazon, North and South America, study shows

Posted on

amazon rainforest
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

University of Arkansas researchers have established a link between climate patterns in the Amazon and large parts of North and South America using their newly developed tree-ring chronology from the Amazon River basin.


The discovery helps researchers better understand large-scale climate extremes and the impact of the El Niño phenomenon.

Tree growth is a well-established climate proxy. By comparing growth rings in Cedrela odorata trees found in the Rio Paru watershed of the eastern Amazon River with hundreds of similar chronologies in North and South America, scientists have shown an inverse relationship in tree growth, and therefore precipitation patterns, between the areas. Drought in the Amazon is correlated with wetness in the southwestern United States, Mexico and Patagonia, and vice versa.

The process is driven by the El Niño phenomenon, which influences surface-level winds along the equator, researchers said. El Niño is the name given to a large-scale irregularly occurring climate pattern associated with unusually warm water in the Pacific Ocean.

“The new Cedrela chronologies from the Amazon, when compared with the hundreds of tree-ring chronologies in temperate North and South America, document this Pan American resonance of climate and ecosystem extremes in the centuries before widespread deforestation or human-caused climate change,” said Dave Stahle, Distinguished Professor of geosciences and first author of a study documenting the findings in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

Credit: University of Arkansas

The connection was not documented until researchers at the University of Arkansas Tree Ring Laboratory, along with colleagues from Brazil and Argentina, developed rainfall reconstructions from growth rings in Cedrela trees. Most rainfall records in the Amazon only date back about 70 years, but Cedrelas live for 200 to 300 years, providing valuable rainfall proxies that pre-date human-influenced climate change. Their work in the Amazon is documented

0

South Brunswick Board Of Education Profile: Arthur Robinson

Posted on

SOUTH BRUNSWICK, NJ – Arthur L. Robinson, loves collecting rare books and textbooks to build his personal library. A current member of the South Brunswick Board of Education, Robinson says that the court’s decision to add more housing to the district could eventually strain school resources. But he hopes to tackle this problem through experience and leadership skills and lead the district toward achieving its academic goals.

Read below to learn more about Robinson and his platform for the upcoming elections in South Brunswick.

Name – Arthur L. Robinson

Age (as of Election Day) – 63

Position Sought – South Brunswick School Board Member

Does anyone in your family work in politics or government? – No

Education –

Master’s in Environmental Policy Studies, NJIT

Bachelor’s in Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University

Professional diploma, Wharton Management Program, UPENN

Professional diploma, Naval Command and Staff Program, U.S. Naval War College

Certified Public Manager, Rutgers University and the state of New Jersey Civil Service Commission

Occupation –

Manager, state of New Jersey, Department of Environmental Protection and formerly as a Chemical Safety Engineer, 16 years.

Retired U.S. Navy Commander, 22 years

Previous or Current Elected or Appointed Office

South Brunswick Board of Education member since 2008, presently serving as vice-President and chair of the Policy Committee; previously served as Budget Committee Chair.

Served on the Negotiations Committee.

Former member of the South Brunswick Township Planning Board.

Why are you seeking elective office?

I’m seeking reelection to the South Brunswick School Board to continue providing leadership and continuity of board operations as a part of the policy-making body during these tough times fighting the COVID-19 Pandemic and to continue ensuring that the district receives its economic fair share of resources from the state. I will continue to work steadfast with my fellow

0

College basketball schedule 2020-21: Iowa to face Gonzaga in potential top-five showdown in South Dakota

Posted on


College basketball continues to load up on elite, must-see games for its upcoming season.


The latest late-offseason upgrade features two Final Four contenders — Gonzaga playing Iowa — in a game to be played on Dec. 19 in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, sources told CBS Sports. The Sanford Pentagon (the same site hosting the tournament field formerly labeled the 2020 Battle 4 Atlantis) will be witness to the fourth meeting ever between the Bulldogs and Hawkeyes. 


Gonzaga is ranked No. 1 in CBS Sports’ Top 25 And 1 preseason rankings. The Hawkeyes are No. 5.


Itching for more college hoops analysis? Listen below and subscribe to the Eye on College Basketball podcast​ where we take you beyond the hardwood with insider information and instant reactions.


The game is a goodie, and not just because Gonzaga could be the best team in college basketball. This tilt would also will feature the lock-of-locks preseason pick for national player of the year, Iowa center Luka Garza. The senior big man opted to return to college basketball after being a consensus First Team All-America/Big Ten Player of the Year. He averaged 23.9 points, 8.9 rebounds and 1.8 blocks a season ago; Iowa was well on its way to the 2020 NCAA Tournament, thanks in large part to Garza’s play.


Garza won’t be the only potential preseason All-American selection in this game. Gonzaga guard Corey Kispert leads maybe the most well-rounded starting five in the sport. The Zags are loaded yet again and have championship aspirations. 


Gonzaga was able to fill this opening on its slate because, just as it did with securing Baylor for a Dec. 5 game in Indianapolis, Iowa was both a desirable, high-quality opponent and a team that

1 2