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Pac-12 football players lead way as college athletes speak out

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It was a rare and dramatic power play from a group of organized college athletes. But how it was delivered to reporters was noteworthy, too. The message came from the Gmail account of Valentino Daltoso, an offensive lineman at the University of California, and offered the personal email addresses of the other players so reporters could contact them.

“The interests of athletes aren’t always in line with the institutions and coaches,” said Andrew Cooper, a Cal cross-country runner who helped organize the effort. “It was important that we talked directly to the media.”

As college sports navigate their returns, enveloped by issues of racial justice, safety and amateurism, athletes have advocated for themselves this year in unprecedented ways. That’s including how they have delivered their messages.

Many college athletic departments prohibit players from talking to journalists without team permission. Some team handbooks urge players not to speak to the media at all. Others, including at the University of Alabama and the University of Georgia, have policies against freshmen speaking to the media during the regular season. And many schools have policies that monitor or even restrict players’ social media accounts.

But in their efforts to advocate for change this year, players have increasingly cut out their athletic departments. The Pac-12 players maintained correspondence with reporters over several weeks about their negotiations with the conference. When Florida State’s football coach said in an interview that he was having one-on-one conversations with players about George Floyd and racial justice, defensive lineman Marvin Wilson tweeted that it wasn’t true. Clemson’s football program recently eliminated a long-standing rule barring players from using social media, after star quarterback Trevor Lawrence tweeted about players’ rights and the return of the season over the summer.

As games are canceled and some universities withhold information about positive coronavirus

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Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to speak with Malala Yousafzai about COVID-19’s impact on girls’ education

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Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan Markle, are scheduled to appear in a video Sunday with activist and Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai to discuss the barriers facing girls in their access to education around the world amid the coronavirus pandemic.



Prince Harry, Meghan Markle looking at a cell phone: Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to speak with Malala Yousafzai about COVID-19's impact on girls' education


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Prince Harry, Meghan Markle to speak with Malala Yousafzai about COVID-19’s impact on girls’ education

According to The Associated Press, the conversation will be published on the Malala Fund’s YouTube channel and website in celebration of International Day of the Girl Child.

The United Nations declared Oct. 11 as International Day of the Girl in 2011 to promote girls’ rights and address obstacles young women face across the world.

The Malala Fund, founded in 2013 by Yousafzai and her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, is an international nonprofit organization partnering with girls education initiatives in various countries, including Afghanistan, Brazil and India.

Research by the Malala Fund suggests that approximately 20 million secondary-school-aged girls may never return to classrooms once schools reopen after the coronavirus pandemic ends.

Since moving to California and cutting financial ties with the British monarchy, Prince Harry and Markle have become increasingly vocal on political and social issues, with the couple saying in a September video that U.S. voters need to “reject hate speech” and “misinformation” ahead of the November election.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex also published a joint op-ed in London’s Evening Standard last week, calling for an end to “structural racism.” The couple wrote that “untapped potential will never get to be realized” if structural racism continues to exist in Britain and around the world.

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