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College football rankings: LSU, Mississippi State losses see SEC West teams tumble in CBS Sports 76

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CBS Sports graphic

One of my favorite parts about the month of October in college football is how quickly the rankings adjust to those initial reactions from the opening weeks of the season. In “normal” seasons this, would still be the point where teams have finally have a couple conference games in the books and whatever kind of overreaction we made from the few September results worth noting has been put to the test by the grind of league play. 

Even in a “normal” year, this is the point where we identify an early-season result that has been proven to be wildly misleading. In 2020, that game is Mississippi State’s 44-34 win at LSU. The biggest game on the SEC’s opening-week schedule had everything fans could want, from the intrigue of seeing how the defending champs would replace Joe Burrow and more than a dozen starters to the SEC debut of Mike Leach. By the time K.J. Costello and the Bulldogs (who entered the game as 18-point underdogs) were done carving up LSU for 623 passing yards in the upset win, a new era was proclaimed in the conference. Mike Leach was here, we thought, and the league would never be the same. 

Well, while we did see scoreboard-breaking totals in the SEC this past weekend, none of it came from Mississippi State. The Bulldogs did not even score an offensive point in a 14-2 loss to Kentucky, a result that was preceded by a 21-14 loss to Arkansas. Ever since the Leach era started with lighting up LSU, Costello has thrown the ball 114 times and the Mississippi State offense has scored just two touchdowns.   

Now at 1-2, Mississippi State finds itself at the bottom of the SEC West standings with LSU. That same LSU team that started in

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Athletes face emotional blow as pandemic uproots college sports

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Early mornings, late nights, countless hours of training. And now, perhaps nothing to show for it.

Where student-athletes are left after programs cut or postponed

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That’s a glimpse at the uncertainty for college athletes across the country who have had seasons derailed. In some cases, their programs have even been cut altogether as schools react to the health risks and financial ripples of COVID-19.

The pandemic has shaken the college sports scene to its core, dealing an emotional blow to athletes as they’re forced to stay on their toes about the status of their careers.

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Some college football conferences have made a loud return to action, but many athletes in lower revenue sports – the runners, swimmers, golfers, and soccer players – are still waiting to take the field or hear if they’ll be able to compete again.

Many athletic conferences have pushed non-football fall sports to the spring. But with CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield saying a vaccine won’t be widely available until mid-2021, even that timeframe could make it difficult to restart sports en masse while keeping everyone safe.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Along with the men's and women's swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men's and women's golf, and men's lightweight rowing.


© Provided by Connor LaMastra
Along with the men’s and women’s swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men’s and women’s golf, and men’s lightweight rowing.

College football and COVID-19: A big, disjointed experiment exposes scientific, political gaps

Between the decisions made by schools, conferences, local and state officials or the CDC itself, the fates of so many athletic careers rest in the hands of higher powers.

Some students have already been dealt disappointing results.

‘A total slap in the face’

Wrestlers at Old Dominion, swimmers at UConn and baseball players at Boise State are all in the same boat. So are

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College sports cut, seasons canceled: Student athletes feel abandoned

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Early mornings, late nights, countless hours of training. And now, perhaps nothing to show for it.

That’s a glimpse at the uncertainty for college athletes across the country who have had seasons derailed. In some cases, their programs have even been cut altogether as schools react to the health risks and financial ripples of COVID-19.

The pandemic has shaken the college sports scene to its core, dealing an emotional blow to athletes as they’re forced to stay on their toes about the status of their careers.

Some college football conferences have made a loud return to action, but many athletes in lower revenue sports – the runners, swimmers, golfers, and soccer players – are still waiting to take the field or hear if they’ll be able to compete again.

Many athletic conferences have pushed non-football fall sports to the spring. But with CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield saying a vaccine won’t be widely available until mid-2021, even that timeframe could make it difficult to restart sports en masse while keeping everyone safe.

College football and COVID-19: A big, disjointed experiment exposes scientific, political gaps

Between the decisions made by schools, conferences, local and state officials or the CDC itself, the fates of so many athletic careers rest in the hands of higher powers.

Some students have already been dealt disappointing results.

‘A total slap in the face’

Wrestlers at Old Dominion, swimmers at UConn and baseball players at Boise State are all in the same boat. So are athletes from 11 different athletic programs at Stanford and seven different teams at George Washington.

They’re among the dozens of programs that have been cut by colleges this year, leaving athletes with a nerve-wracking decision: To stay at their school or transfer to continue playing the sport they love.

Connor LaMastra

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Our View: Thumbs up to more youth sports facilities, a career of public service, a scholarship winner | COMMENTARY

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THUMBS UP: While we certainly miss many, we do try to recognize long-tenured public servants at the end of successful careers. The latest to retire after a long career with Carroll County Government is Clay Black, who served in various positions for 37 years. He retired last week as bureau chief of development review. “It’s safe to say that just about every development project in the county and the municipalities Clay has either reviewed or supervised over the past 30-plus years,” Tom Devilbiss, director of land and resource management, said in a farewell to Black at the Sept. 24 Board of Commissioners meeting. Commissioner Stephen Wantz, R-District 1, called Black “the heart and soul of Carroll County.” Black worked his way up from the permits office in 1983 to construction agreements coordinator to subdivision review assistant to development systems supervisor before becoming bureau chief in 2005. Black said he enjoyed serving the county commissioners, citizens and businesses in Carroll County. “My position has given me opportunities to help others with their projects. … allowed me to meet a vast amount of individuals and to work with amazing colleagues,” he told us. “Being able to work with citizens, developers, government officials, outside agencies, colleagues and others has been rewarding.” Black said he plans to spend more time with his wife and dogs and that after a scheduled surgery and physically therapy, he will be spending his days, among other things, golfing, traveling, camping, and volunteering. We wish him well in retirement.

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Live: Watch U regents meet, vote on cutting three sports

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The University of Minnesota Board of Regents is holdings its monthly meeting starting at 9:15 a.m. Friday and one of the items on the agenda is the elimination of teams in three men’s sports: track and field, tennis and gymnastics.

Discussion started at last month’s meeting, but the 12-member board decided to delay the vote for a month.

There are other items on the agenda not related to the program cuts, so an exact time when the discussion and vote will be taken isn’t known. You can tap here for a link to the meeting agenda.

Here are previous stories about the athletic department’s proposed cuts.

Angry donors say they’ll stop supporting U.

Discussion at last month’s meeting.

The original story about plans to cut the three teams.

Star gymnast Shane Wiskus and others reacted to the cuts.

The university is also planning to cut 41 women athletes to save money.

 

 

 

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