0

SpaceX launches Starlink satellites after string of scrubs

Posted on

ORLANDO, Fla., Oct. 6 (UPI) — After repeated delays due to weather and other problems, SpaceX on Tuesday successfully launched a shipment of 60 Starlink communications satellites from Florida.

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket lifted off about 7:30 a.m. EDT from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. Multiple previous launches had been postponed since Sept. 17.

The flight’s reusable booster landed on a drone ship in the Atlantic Ocean following the launch.

SpaceX founder Elon Musk had tweeted that he would travel to Florida to review the launch following a scrub Friday night he said was due to an “unexpected pressure rise” in a gas generator. The launch was postponed again Monday morning due to rainstorms in the area.

“We will need to make a lot of improvements to have a chance of completing 48 launches next year!” Musk tweeted. “We’re doing a broad review of launch site, propulsion, structures, avionics, range & regulatory constraints this weekend.”

The delays were mirrored by a string of similar scrubs in recent weeks for its main rival, United Launch Alliance, which is trying to send a spy satellite into orbit for the Defense Department.

ULA also has cited weather and mechanical issues with ground systems for the delays that have kept its powerful Delta IV Heavy rocket, carrying the spy satellite, on the launch pad.

“There’s a thousand ways that a launch can go wrong, and only one way it can go right,” Siva Baradvaj, SpaceX space operations engineer, said during a live broadcast for a launch attempt last week.

That attempt was scrubbed due to a sensor reading on ground systems, but Baradvaj noted that the rocket and spacecraft were in good shape.

Tuesday’s launch will ultimately grow the number of Starlink satellites in orbit to well over 700. More have

0

SpaceX scrubs Starlink satellite launch Thursday due to ground sensor reading

Posted on

egxpl5rucaatfpr

A Falcon 9 blasts off on Aug. 30.


SpaceX

The Falcon 9 rocket booster that sent NASA astronauts to the International Space Station in May is set to get recycled again when SpaceX sends 60 more Starlink satellites to orbit atop its column of fire, but it didn’t happen Thursday as planned. 

The launch, originally scheduled for September, has been postponed multiple times due to weather, including on Monday morning when heavy clouds above Florida’s Cape Canaveral prevented launch at the last second. On Thursday, another launch was scrubbed 18 seconds before blastoff due to an aberrant ground sensor reading. A new target launch date has not yet been announced. 

“All in a day’s work for the launch team. They’ll investigate, diagnose probable cause, fix the problem, and get us ready for the next launch attempt,” SpaceX spacecraft operator Siva Bharadvaj tweeted

Elon Musk’s trademark reusable rocket will be making its third flight when it lifts off from Kennedy Space Center. This specific unit sent astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to orbit in May and then launched a South Korean satellite in July. So far, SpaceX has managed to launch and land the same rocket up to six times

When the launch finally gets off the ground, it should be fairly routine. It will be the 13th Starlink mission so far, and SpaceX is planning on dozens more as it grows its broadband mega-constellation.  

One half of the nose cone, or fairing, atop the rocket has also seen

0

SpaceX delays next Starlink satellite fleet launch due to bad weather

Posted on

SpaceX postponed the launch of a new fleet of Starlink internet satellites today (Sept. 28) due to bad weather at the mission’s Florida launch site. 

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was scheduled to launch 60 Starlink satellites from Pad 39A of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida at 10:22 a.m. EDT (1422 GMT), but thick clouds over the launch site prevented the flight. 

“Unfortunately, it looks like due to weather violations, we’re going to to have to scrub today,” Alex Seigel, a senior material planner with SpaceX, said in live commentary. “But again, the most important thing is reducing as much risk on the mission as possible, and with that comes waiting for a window of good weather.”

Related: SpaceX’s Starlink satellite megaconstellation launches in photos 

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying 60 Starlink internet satellites stands atop Pad 39A of NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida during a Sept. 28, 2020 launch attempt.  (Image credit: SpaceX)

The launch delay sets up a traffic jam of sorts in Cape Canaveral, where two more rockets are scheduled to lift off on Tuesday (Sept. 29). 

Up first is a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV Heavy rocket, which is set to launch the classified NROL-44 satellite for the U.S. National Reconnaissance Office at 12:02 a.m. EDT (0402 GMT) on Tuesday. That mission will lift off from Space Launch Complex 37 at the nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. 

SpaceX is next with the launch of a GPS III navigation satellite for the U.S. military. That mission will launch from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 9:55 p.m. EDT (0155 Sept. 30 GMT). 

You can watch those launch live here and on the Space.com homepage, courtesy of ULA and SpaceX.

SpaceX’s Starlink mission will likely have