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New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe

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New research suggests innovative method to analyse the densest star systems in the Universe
Artist’s illustration of supernova remnant Credit: Pixabay

In a recently published study, a team of researchers led by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) at Monash university suggests an innovative method to analyse gravitational waves from neutron star mergers, where two stars are distinguished by type (rather than mass), depending on how fast they’re spinning.


Neutron stars are extremely dense stellar objects that form when giant stars explode and die—in the explosion, their cores collapse, and the protons and electrons melt into each other to form a remnant neutron star.

In 2017, the merging of two neutron stars, called GW170817, was first observed by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. This merger is well-known because scientists were also able to see light produced from it: high-energy gamma rays, visible light, and microwaves. Since then, an average of three scientific studies on GW170817 have been published every day.

In January this year, the LIGO and Virgo collaborations announced a second neutron star merger event called GW190425. Although no light was detected, this event is particularly intriguing because the two merging neutron stars are significantly heavier than GW170817, as well as previously known double neutron stars in the Milky Way.

Scientists use gravitational-wave signals—ripples in the fabric of space and time—to detect pairs of neutron stars and measure their masses. The heavier neutron star of the pair is called the ‘primary’; the lighter one is ‘secondary’.

The recycled-slow labelling scheme of a binary neutron star system

A binary neutron star system usually starts with two ordinary stars, each around ten to twenty times more massive than the Sun. When these massive stars age and run out of ‘fuel’, their lives end in supernova explosions that leave behind compact remnants, or neutron stars. Each remnant neutron star weighs around

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Intellisense Systems Wins Phase II Funding for Fire Weather Observation Sensor from USDA

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This sensor builds on the proven Micro Weather Sensor to include fuel moisture, solar radiation, particulate monitoring, and thermal imaging that will improve firefighting efforts.

Torrance ,CA, Sept. 29, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — September 29, 2020 – Torrance, CA – Intellisense Systems, Inc., a leading provider of integrated environmental sensing solutions, won Phase II funding to continue development of the Fire Weather Observation Sensor (FWOS) from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The FWOS is a stand-alone, unattended, field-deployable sensor for remote measurements of fire weather-related data. These devices will be placed throughout forests and areas prone to wildfire outbreak and transmit data via satellite from anywhere in the world. This development will integrate new sensing capabilities to the proven Micro Weather Sensor (MWS®) platform, including fuel moisture, solar radiation, particulate monitoring, and thermal imaging.

 

In 2020, the Western United States experienced a record-setting number of wildfires, which have displaced millions of residents, burned over 6 million acres, and destroyed nearly 10,000 structures. The FWOS will support fire departments to anticipate fire weather conditions and improve awareness in remote and densely forested regions.

 

“We’re very excited to continue the development of the Fire Weather Observation Sensor,” said David Miller, the Vice President and General Manager of Environmental Monitoring Systems at Intellisense. “New technology that facilitates the detection and management of wildfires is critical. The FWOS falls right in line with our strategic growth plan in applying our MWS system to the fire weather market and aligns with one of our primary goals of providing advanced solutions that ensure the safety and protection of people and property, especially our front-line firefighters.”

 

During Phase I, Intellisense demonstrated the feasibility of adding miniature fuel moisture, particulate, thermal infrared, and solar radiation sensors into the MWS package, and they have already developed a