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Aaron Rodgers thinks “down years” for him are career years for most QBs. Are they?

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Aaron Rodgers is on pace to throw for 52 touchdowns this season, which would be second all-time to Peyton Manning’s 55 in 2013.



a man wearing a hat: Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers leaves the field following an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons on Monday in Green Bay, Wis. (Mike Roemer / Associated Press)


© (Mike Roemer / Associated Press)
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers leaves the field following an NFL football game against the Atlanta Falcons on Monday in Green Bay, Wis. (Mike Roemer / Associated Press)

Not bad for a guy in his 13th year as the Green Bay Packers’ starting quarterback. Or a guy who finished with half that amount last year.

Still, don’t call it a comeback. Or anything of the sort. You might be setting yourself up for a Rodgers retort like this one:

“I sometimes laugh when people talk about down years for me because a lot of times down years for me are career years for most quarterbacks.”

That was part of Rodgers’ response Tuesday when asked on “The Pat McAffee Show” if he was benefitting from being in offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett’s system for a second season. Rodgers answered that he does feel more comfortable this year before seemingly taking umbrage at the premise of the question.

McAffee and company erupted with cheers following Rodgers’ remark, prompting Rodgers to say, “Hey, it’s just the facts, bro.”

But is it?

First, it must be noted that Rodgers put up some excellent numbers last year as he helped the Packers to a 13-3 record. He passed for more than 4,000 yards for the eighth time in his career and had only four passes picked off. His interception percentage of 0.7 was the

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Aaron Rodgers thinks ‘down years’ for him are career years for most QBs. Are they?

Posted on

Aaron Rodgers is on pace to throw for 52 touchdowns this season, which would be second all-time to Peyton Manning’s 55 in 2013.

Not bad for a guy in his 13th year as the Green Bay Packers’ starting quarterback. Or a guy who finished with half that amount last year.

Still, don’t call it a comeback. Or anything of the sort. You might be setting yourself up for a Rodgers retort like this one:

“I sometimes laugh when people talk about down years for me because a lot of times down years for me are career years for most quarterbacks.”

That was part of Rodgers’ response Tuesday when asked on “The Pat McAffee Show” if he was benefitting from being in offensive coordinator Nathaniel Hackett’s system for a second season. Rodgers answered that he does feel more comfortable this year before seemingly taking umbrage at the premise of the question.

McAffee and company erupted with cheers following Rodgers’ remark, prompting Rodgers to say, “Hey, it’s just the facts, bro.”

But is it?

First, it must be noted that Rodgers put up some excellent numbers last year as he helped the Packers to a 13-3 record. He passed for more than 4,000 yards for the eighth time in his career and had only four passes picked off. His interception percentage of 0.7 was the best in the NFL, the fourth time he’s led the league in that category.

As far as touchdown passes go, Rodgers threw 45 in 2011 (second to Drew Brees’ 46 that year) and a league-leading 40 in 2016. So based on those stats, it would be difficult to begrudge someone who considered last season’s 26 to be a down year for him in that category.

But what about Rodgers’ claim that it would be a career year

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Jeff Hafley thinks a lack of experience, execution was what cost Boston College vs. North Carolina

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Eagles quarterback Phil Jurkovec had free rein to air it out. He threw 56 passes, the most by a BC quarterback at Alumni Stadium since at least 1996. And even though his 37 completions, 313 yards, and two touchdowns nearly brought the Eagles back after falling behind, 14-3, in the first quarter, Hafley said there were plays he missed that could have swung the momentum long before BC’s fourth-quarter rally.

“If you watch the tape, there are some plays — there are some explosive plays out there — that with experience, we could’ve hit a couple of big ones,” Hafley said.

More than the plays the Eagles missed, Hafley was concerned by the mistakes that sabotaged them. The Eagles committed 12 penalties, costing them 110 yards. From false starts to unsportsmanlike conduct, the flags were drive killers at pivotal times.

“Whether it was from the wide receiver room or the offensive line or the quarterback, we just need to do a better job in practice,” Hafley said. “It’s fourth and 1, third and 1 and we’re going backwards . . . It can’t happen. We need to do a better job of cleaning up that procedurally and we will.”

The quiet killer for the Eagles was third-down defense. North Carolina’s first two scoring drives were fueled by four straight third-down conversions to start the game. They converted a fifth before a BC stop, and 7 of 12 overall.

“There’s a lot of conversation between [defensive coordinator] Tem [Lukabu] and I talking about third down,” Hafley said. “If you look early in that game — I think there were like six or seven to start — the coverage was there, we had a guy, had a sack, and we just let him off the hook. I mean, you’re talking about changing