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Live: Watch U regents meet, vote on cutting three sports

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The University of Minnesota Board of Regents is holdings its monthly meeting starting at 9:15 a.m. Friday and one of the items on the agenda is the elimination of teams in three men’s sports: track and field, tennis and gymnastics.

Discussion started at last month’s meeting, but the 12-member board decided to delay the vote for a month.

There are other items on the agenda not related to the program cuts, so an exact time when the discussion and vote will be taken isn’t known. You can tap here for a link to the meeting agenda.

Here are previous stories about the athletic department’s proposed cuts.

Angry donors say they’ll stop supporting U.

Discussion at last month’s meeting.

The original story about plans to cut the three teams.

Star gymnast Shane Wiskus and others reacted to the cuts.

The university is also planning to cut 41 women athletes to save money.

 

 

 

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New bipartisan council formed to defend election integrity launches $20 million public education campaign to count every vote

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New bipartisan council formed to defend election integrity launches $20 million public education campaign to count every vote

PR Newswire

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7, 2020

WASHINGTON, Oct. 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — A bipartisan group of more than 40 former elected officials, former Cabinet secretaries, retired military officials, and civic leaders called the National Council on Election Integrity has formed to defend the legitimacy of our elections and ensure that every American’s vote is counted in 2020, Issue One announced today.

The National Council on Election Integrity — which includes individuals who have advised presidents, former party leaders, and heads of some of the largest civic organizations in the country — has launched “Count Every Vote,” a new $20 million public education campaign highlighting the country’s ability to hold safe and secure elections during the coronavirus pandemic and stressing that all citizens’ votes must be counted, regardless of whom they vote for.

This effort begins with a $4 million TV and digital ad buy. The Count Every Vote campaign’s TV ads will be airing nationally, including in the battleground states of Arizona, Georgia, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Digital ads will begin running in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

“Americans have always found a way to vote and make their voices heard,” states the new TV ad. “Help make sure every vote is counted — no matter who you voted for … While this election might feel different, we all call America home.”

The Count Every Vote campaign also encourages citizens to sign a pledge at CountEveryVote.org that demands that every vote cast in accordance with applicable laws is counted this November.

Moreover, the National Council is urging Congress to create a bipartisan national commission to help

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College students upended by the pandemic wrestle with yet another challenge: How to vote this fall?

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“It was so disheartening to be extremely passionate about this work and to recognize and tell other people that voting is important and necessary to the health of our democracy, then to not be able to participate in it,” the 21-year-old said, adding that when she called the county, officials told her they were not sure why her ballot never arrived. “You have to think: If I was stopped from voting, who else was stopped from voting?”

There are signs that younger Americans, who have historically turned out at the polls at lower rates than older voters, are more energized about voting this November than they have been in decades. Yet the pandemic has created thorny challenges for college students trying to cast their ballots this year — and their predicaments are growing more dire as state voter registration deadlines loom.

Some schools that initially reopened this fall have already sent students home after struggling to contain soaring infection rates, creating complications for those who were planning to vote at or near campus. Other schools may follow suit at any given point this fall, leaving students unsure about the best address to use to register to vote.

Many colleges and universities that are still open canceled their fall breaks in an effort to send students home by Thanksgiving, which means some students who had planned on voting early at home in October no longer will have time off to do so.

The hurdles would be significant for any voter — much less for those who will be casting a ballot in a presidential election for the first time.

“Nervous and anxious definitely describe the apprehension and fear, honestly, of figuring out this voting plan,” said Katya Ehresman, a senior at UT-Austin who is planning to vote in person the day

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Cleveland Heights-University Heights teachers wrapping up vote on “last, best, final offer” from school board

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UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Ohio — Votes from the teachers’ union were still being collected this week on a “last, best and final” contract offer the Cleveland Heights-University Heights school board authorized Sept. 29, citing an impasse in negotiations dating back to August.



a person holding a sign: Scott Gainer, CFO and treasurer of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District, and Board of Education President Jodi Sourini are shown in this file photo from discussions of the continuing financial drain from EdChoice private tuition vouchers, and the need for an operating levy in the spring that wound up losing by 600 votes, leading to a smaller version appearing on the November ballot.


© Patrick O’Donnell, The Plain Dealer/cleveland.com/TNS
Scott Gainer, CFO and treasurer of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights City School District, and Board of Education President Jodi Sourini are shown in this file photo from discussions of the continuing financial drain from EdChoice private tuition vouchers, and the need for an operating levy in the spring that wound up losing by 600 votes, leading to a smaller version appearing on the November ballot.

Cleveland Heights Teachers Union President Karen Rego said Saturday (Oct. 4) that the roughly 500 members were still voting on whether to accept that offer or reject it and authorize the AFT-Local 795 executive board to strike.

“We won’t have a tally of our contract vote until Oct. 6 after all the ballots have been counted,” Rego explained earlier. “Until we have that final count we do not have any further action.”

School district officials pointed out that a formal 10-day notice of intent to strike must be provided in advance by the union.

At the same time, both sides have already shown willingness to return to negotiations.

“We are under a continued duty to bargain,” CH-UH school board president Jodi Sourini said Friday after tearfully introducing earlier in the week the resolution declaring an “ultimate impasse” in negotiations and authorizing the district to implement the one-year contract.

District officials said they already met with teachers’ union representatives to discuss the implications after the school board vote.

“At the union’s request, the district has also indicated it is willing to meet with the bargaining teams and federal 

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University of Illinois nurses vote to approve new contract, following week-long strike

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More than 1,300 nurses voted overwhelmingly Wednesday evening to approve a new contract with the University of Illinois Hospital and clinics, after a weeklong strike.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: University of Illinois Hospital RN Christine Sichuan listens at a rally as more than 4,000 SEIU represented hospital workers joined hospital nurses on strike, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.


© E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS
University of Illinois Hospital RN Christine Sichuan listens at a rally as more than 4,000 SEIU represented hospital workers joined hospital nurses on strike, Monday, Sept. 14, 2020.

The nurses voted 842-13 in favor of the new, four-year contract. The nurses’ union, the Illinois Nurses Association, had reached a tentative agreement with the hospital Sept. 24 after the strike ended Sept. 19.

A major sticking point in contract negotiations had been nurse-to-patient ratios. The nurses wanted ratios and the hospital did not, saying it preferred a model that matched nurses’ skills with patients’ needs.

Ultimately, the hospital committed to hiring the equivalent of at least 160 full-time nurses, “creating natural nurse-to-patient ratios that improve core staffing and quality of care,” according to a union news release. The hospital also agreed to raises of 1% the first year, 1.5% the second year, 1.75% the third year, and 2% the fourth year of the contract, as well as the implementation of various safety and protective measures.

“This contract represents a vast improvement compared to where we were before the strike and we are happy to see that the hospital recognized the importance of supporting the nurses,” said Doris Carroll, Illinois Nurses Association president, in a news release.

Michael Zenn, CEO of University of Illinois Hospital & Clinics, said in a statement last week that he was pleased the strike had ended and believed the new agreement was in the best interests of patients and employees.

During the strike, the hospital worked with an agency to bring in temporary nurses, asked ambulances to take new patients elsewhere, didn’t take

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