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University of Washington virus outbreak continues to grow

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SEATTLE (AP) — A COVID-19 outbreak involving students at the University of Washington’s fraternities and sororities continues to grow with 238 positive cases as of Monday morning.

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University spokesperson Victor Balta said Monday the cases were spread among 16 sororities and fraternities in the 45-chapter system, which is north of the university campus in Seattle.

The numbers are up from 179 cases as of Tuesday last week, and 227 cases on Friday.

Students who have tested positive or have COVID-like symptoms are being told to isolate in their current place of residence, according to the university. At a press conference Thursday, Gov. Jay Inslee expressed frustration about the behavior on Greek Row “that is exposing all of us to great risk.”

“They’ve got to step up and take responsibility for this because these things can just blow up, and frankly they are,” he said last week.

Inslee said his office planned to make it clear that there needs to be leadership from the sororities and fraternities on this issue. On Monday, Inslee spokesperson Mike Faulk told The Associated Press in an email that the governor’s policy staff has been working on recommendations related to higher education to further mitigate COVID spread. The recommendations are still being developed for the governor’s review, he wrote.

An outbreak in June infected 154 students in 15 fraternity houses at the university.

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The George Washington University Law School

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Join a long tradition of excellence.

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, D.C.

As D.C.’s first law school, the George Washington University Law School has set the standard for legal education for more than 150 years. GW Law has an impressive, longstanding record of educating forward-thinking leaders. For example, by 1895, our graduates had already written the patents for Bell’s telephone, Mergenthaler’s linotype machine, and Eastman’s roll film camera. We continue to set the curve today, with a robust curriculum offering more than 275 elective courses designed to give students both a broad and in-depth legal education.

Our world-renowned faculty is regularly featured in print and in the media for outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC, and CNN. Our faculty also has been cited as having the second-most downloaded scholarship on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) law school list. Our faculty members are experts who have written the leading textbooks in their fields and testified before Congress, but their primary commitment is to prepare the next generation of lawyers to meet the challenges of our ever-evolving world. In addition, our location in the heart of Washington, D.C., has allowed us to build a superb adjunct faculty of distinguished practitioners who are top lawyers at law firms, at government agencies, and on Capitol Hill. We’re the only law school where a sitting Supreme Court justice teaches a regular course.

Along with offering a robust curriculum, GW Law emphasizes helping students gain practical skills and professional knowledge to help build fulfilling careers. Our Fundamentals of Lawyering course helps students master the core knowledge provided by traditional first-year legal research and writing courses, along with the client problem-solving, creative thinking, and sound judgment that law firms have told us they desire in first-year associates.

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George Washington University to conduct spring semester online

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“Managing this pandemic has called on us all to do our part to keep the community healthy and safe, and to support one another through these difficult decisions,” officials said in an email to the university community.

University leaders considered the spread of the virus, the school’s ability to house students safely and feedback from the community as they weighed the possibility of reopening the campus, according to the announcement.

Based on current conditions, the school said it is also unlikely commencement will be held in person in May.

GWU President Thomas J. ­LeBlanc told the Faculty Senate on Friday the spring semester “will look a lot like it looks right now,” according to the GW Hatchet, the student newspaper. Most classes are being taught remotely; exceptions have been made for a handful of courses that require research or in-person instruction.

The campus has reported 29 positive virus cases since August, the school’s testing dashboard shows. About 500 students are living on campus instead of the usual population of between 6,500 and 6,800 students, Maralee Csellar, a campus spokeswoman, said. Next semester, the university may expand housing, but it will depend on additional health and safety assessments, Csellar said.

Officials do not expect new cuts because of Friday’s announcement. And tuition discounts offered to most undergraduate students this fall will remain, the school said.

Hundreds of students and employees are urging the president to resign. More than a thousand students, staff, faculty and alumni have pledged to stop donating until LeBlanc is replaced, said Gaurav Gawankar,

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Washington coach Jimmy Lake’s College Football Playoff plan would solve one tricky Pac-12 problem

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Jimmy Lake has a plan for a more perfect playoff.

It’s a six-team field, and the seeding is simple: All Power Five conference champions are automatic entrants in the field, with the College Football Playoff committee ranking them using the same criteria it currently employs. The sixth and final spot goes to a “wild card” — whether an independent (like Notre Dame in 2018), a Group of Five champion (like undefeated and subsequently snubbed Central Florida in 2017) or a second-place finisher in a Power Five conference (like Alabama in 2017).

In the first of three rounds, the top two seeds receive a bye and the winners of a 3-6 and 4-5 matchup advance to the semifinals. Then, same as the existing format, the final four teams play for a spot in the title game.

Of course, the JLP (Jimmy Lake Plan) would essentially solve one prickly problem — a Pac-12 program has not been selected for the College Football Playoff since Washington in 2016. It would also put significantly less pressure on the committee, with the foremost responsibility being ranking the conference champions and selecting a single wild card.

“I think that way you take all the subjectivity out of it, all the politics, the East Coast (bias), all of that,” Lake, the Huskies’ first-year head coach, said in a Pac-12 coaches media webinar Wednesday. “Let the champions move on. Let the teams play, and we’ll see who the best team is at the end of the year.”

Lake is so passionate about the JLP, in fact, that he and his oldest son — Jimmy Jr. — recently reseeded every playoff since the CFP came into existence in 2014, using their system. (The coronavirus pandemic, without a doubt, has provided time for passion projects.) Lake declared Wednesday that fans

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