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5 ways in which Artificial Intelligence is transforming education system

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a circuit board: How Artificial Intelligence is transforming education system


How Artificial Intelligence is transforming education system

The face of the education system has undergone a sea change in recent years. The present-day educational structure is competitive, challenging, and needs to be capable of meeting international benchmarks. The emerging technologies, such as artificial intelligence, are changing our lives as they are being put to different purposes. And just like other areas, AI is disrupting and creating an impact on the education system as well.

AI is making long strides in the academic world, turning the traditional methods of imparting knowledge into a comprehensive system of learning with the use of simulation and augmented reality tools.

Here are some ways in which AI is transforming education as we know it:

1. Effective management of administrative tasks

Through the automation of administrative work, artificial intelligence allows ample time for teachers that they can utilise to engage with students in an improved manner and assist them through the challenges efficiently. AI helps with school admissions via the automation of the categorization and processing of paperwork. It also helps with the grading of test papers as AI helps assess both objectives as well as subjective answer sheets.

This saves time and efforts of the teacher along with avoiding human errors of lapses in attention or even unconscious biases.

2. Access to quality content

Automation has also made quality education accessible to a larger population in the form of smart content. The professors can compose or design study materials customized according to the different needs of the students in different regions with the help of evolved applications of AI. The learning material can be shared in diverse forms that may consist of virtual formats such as video conferences and lectures.

In addition to the intelligent tutoring system, smart learning content created using AI will assist

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Key ways Sullivan and Hayes differ on the economy and education in the coronavirus crisis

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The coronavirus crisis that continues to stifle jobs and schools across the nation is a key dividing line in the race for Connecticut’s most competitive congressional district.

A New Fairfield prosecutor trying to be the first Republican to represent the 5th District since 2006 says the direction voters wanted when they elected Donald Trump president in 2016 is the way out of the COVID-19 crisis for people in northwestern and central Connecticut.

But U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes says the correction voters wanted when they elected her and a Democratic majority to the House of Representatives in 2018 is the way to help schools in need and get the economy back on its feet in Connecticut.

Republican challenger David X. Sullivan, a retired assistant U.S. attorney, said he started out campaigning against Hayes but has wound up fighting a war against “Marxism.”

“We need to move forward to provide help to people, but we have to transition away from total dependency on the federal government,” Sullivan told Hearst Connecticut Media last week. “We want to get people back to work.”

Hayes, who first made the spotlight in 2016 as the national Teacher of the Year, said relief for jobs and schools in Connecticut’s 5th District can’t wait for the next election day mandate on Nov. 3.

“We are in a Democratic majority in the House and the bills we are passing reflect Democratic priorities, but they also reflect the priorities of the people of this district,” Hayes told Hearst Connecticut Media. “I vote for the plan that does the greatest amount of good for the greatest amount of people.”

Hayes’ and Sullivan’s comments came at the end of a week of virtual 5th District debates in Danbury and Waterbury, and a week of partisan debates in Washington, D.C., over a new

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NASA, space industry seek new ways to cope with space debris

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Oct. 5 (UPI) — NASA’s official watchdog panel has renewed calls for the agency to move faster on a plan to better track and mitigate dangers posed by orbiting debris in space.

Members of NASA’s Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel said during a regular meeting last week that the agency has made some progress, but it needs to focus on space debris as a top priority.

At stake is the safety of astronauts, anyone going into space on planned private missions and the nation’s growing fleet of satellites used for national security, communications and scientific observation.

Because debris orbits at thousands of miles per hour, even tiny pieces of space trash can puncture spacecraft.

The panel’s comments came on the heels of NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine telling a Senate Committee on Wednesday that the agency needs Congress to fund a comprehensive strategy for debris tracking and management, including international outreach.

“I cannot emphasize the importance of this issue enough, and we really need some action taken now,” said Patricia Sanders, who chairs the panel.

Companies such as Northrop Grumman have proposed in-space collection and recycling stations — basically additional satellites that would capture debris and either destroy it or melt it down and manufacture something new.

NASA is funding limited projects to repurpose space debris, including a mission by Houston-based Nanoracks to convert spent rocket boosters in orbit into useful technology and possibly even human habitats — what the company calls Outposts.

“We are rapidly reaching the point where we have to be concerned about how we dispose of hardware,” Jeffery Manber, CEO of NanoRacks, said in an interview Friday.

His company has $15 million from NASA to begin the experiment, and plans to launch next year a robotic cutting machine that will study how to cut metal in space.

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