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Man jailed for rally riots, torch march attends university

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Cole Evan White joined torch-carrying white supremacists on a march through the University of Virginia’s campus and attacked anti-racism protesters the next day. Within a matter of days, he enrolled at a university in California.

White, 26, continued his studies at San Francisco State University after he pleaded guilty to conspiring to riot on the streets of Charlottesville, Virginia. He was jailed for more than seven months between his October 2018 arrest and his release on $10,000 bond in May 2019.

Now he’s facing a possible prison term. A federal judge is scheduled to sentence White on Friday for his role in the violence that reverberated far from the Virginia college town.


San Francisco State University spokesman Kent Bravo said the admissions process for it and other schools in the California State University system does not ask applicants about their criminal background. The university learned of White’s arrest and guilty plea when an Associated Press reporter inquired about his status this week, according to Bravo.

Bravo said White is currently a part-time student who first enrolled in the fall 2017 semester, which started less than a month after White joined members of a now-defunct white supremacist group called the Rise Above Movement in attacking counterprotesters at the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville.

“San Francisco State University unequivocally condemns white supremacy,” Bravo said in a statement Monday. “We send our compassion and concern to those affected by the events of that tragic weekend, specifically the victims and families of those who were targeted by individuals motivated by hate.”

White is one of four Rise Above Movement members or associates who pleaded guilty to charges that they punched, kicked, choked and head-butted counterprotesters at the August 2017 rally. White’s three co-defendants already have been sentenced to between two and three years

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Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University

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Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University

“Ultimately, I wanted to get my Master’s in International Security, focusing on conflict resolution, threat analysis, and intelligence. The thing that sets the school apart are the professors. They are at the forefront of their fields.”

—Becca Cooper, Master’s in International Security student

Proximity to the nation’s capital is a considerable advantage for those dreaming of a career in politics, government, and public service, and few schools are closer to the policy- and decision-makers of Washington, D.C. than the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University.

Location to future careers and important internships is just the beginning of the numerous advantages an education at the Schar School affords. With 22 undergraduate and graduate programs, part-time and full-time options, and dedicated career services advisors, the Arlington, Va.-based Schar School prepares graduates for important positions in key agencies across a wide spectrum of specialties.

The Schar School was named No. 2 in the country in 2019 by U.S. News & World Report for its security studies programs. If you dream of a career in international security, homeland security, emergency management, or other subjects that tackle “wicked problems” around the world, the Schar School has top-rated academic programs to help you achieve your goals.

Schar School of Policy and Government top-ranked programs:

Bachelor of Arts in Government and International Politics

Bachelor of Science in Public Administration

Graduate Certificate in Biodefense

Graduate Certificate in Emergency Management and Homeland Security

Graduate Certificate in Global Health and Security

Graduate Certificate in Illicit Trade Analysis

Graduate Certificate in National Security and Public Policy

Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management

Graduate Certificate in Public Management

Graduate Certificate in Science, Technology, and Security

Graduate Certificate in Strategic Trade

Graduate Certificate in Terrorism and Homeland Security

Master’s in

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Nobel Prize in Economics awarded to Paul Milgrom and Robert Wilson of Stanford University

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“Their discoveries have benefited sellers, buyers and taxpayers around the world,” the prize committee said.

The men were honored for theoretical insights into developing the best rules for bidding and for establishing the final price. The resulting improvements in auction formats have proven especially useful in auctioning off goods and services that are difficult to price using traditional methods, such as radio frequencies, the committee said.

Wilson, 83, was cited for theoretical research that explored “the winner’s curse” in auctions of goods that ultimately had the same value to all potential buyers, such as minerals in a specific geographic area. He developed a theory explaining the tendency of successful bidders to place bids lower than their own estimate of the item’s value to themselves or other buyers, because they feared paying too much.

Milgrom, 72, drew the nod for developing a more general theory of auctions involving values that vary between bidders. After analyzing bidding strategies in several popular auctions, he showed the best format to be one in which bidders learn more about each other’s estimated values during bidding.

Auctions are embedded throughout the modern economy. Art houses use them to sell paintings and antiquities. Search engines rely on them to dispose of advertising space. And public authorities offer airport landings slots and mineral rights via auctions.

Global financial markets also operate on their principles.

Asked by reporters about his own use of auctions, Wilson mentioned that he had recently purchased a pair of ski boots on eBay. “It’s something you encounter a lot,” he said.

The prize committee said that Milgrom and Wilson had invented new formats for simultaneously auctioning off many interrelated objects for societal benefit rather than maximal revenue. In 1994, the U.S. government first used their insights to auction off radio frequencies to telecommunications companies.

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The George Washington University Law School

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Join a long tradition of excellence.

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, D.C.

As D.C.’s first law school, the George Washington University Law School has set the standard for legal education for more than 150 years. GW Law has an impressive, longstanding record of educating forward-thinking leaders. For example, by 1895, our graduates had already written the patents for Bell’s telephone, Mergenthaler’s linotype machine, and Eastman’s roll film camera. We continue to set the curve today, with a robust curriculum offering more than 275 elective courses designed to give students both a broad and in-depth legal education.

Our world-renowned faculty is regularly featured in print and in the media for outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, MSNBC, and CNN. Our faculty also has been cited as having the second-most downloaded scholarship on the Social Science Research Network (SSRN) law school list. Our faculty members are experts who have written the leading textbooks in their fields and testified before Congress, but their primary commitment is to prepare the next generation of lawyers to meet the challenges of our ever-evolving world. In addition, our location in the heart of Washington, D.C., has allowed us to build a superb adjunct faculty of distinguished practitioners who are top lawyers at law firms, at government agencies, and on Capitol Hill. We’re the only law school where a sitting Supreme Court justice teaches a regular course.

Along with offering a robust curriculum, GW Law emphasizes helping students gain practical skills and professional knowledge to help build fulfilling careers. Our Fundamentals of Lawyering course helps students master the core knowledge provided by traditional first-year legal research and writing courses, along with the client problem-solving, creative thinking, and sound judgment that law firms have told us they desire in first-year associates.

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Cardiff University Covid support ‘too little too late’

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Ellie CooperImage copyright
Family Photo

Image caption

‘It feels like I’ve paid £9,000 for five new friends and a couple of Zoom classes,’ says Ellie Cooper

A student who is self-isolating at Cardiff University has said coronavirus support feels “too little too late”.

Ellie Cooper, 19, is a first year International Relations student and is self-isolating with four others after a flatmate tested positive.

She said that four out of six flats in her student accommodation block are isolating due to positive cases.

Cardiff University said it was “deeply concerned” to learn of students’ experiences.

  • Wales close to coronavirus tipping point, FM says
  • More than 100 primary school pupils self-isolating

Emails, seen by BBC Wales, sent to students by the university on Sunday, said a mobile testing unit, run by Public Health Wales (PHW), will operate at Talybont student accommodation from Monday.

It also said a university screening service for those without symptoms would begin on Tuesday and offered students a free laundry service and £20 voucher to spend in the “student marketplace”.

Image copyright
Google

Image caption

Students at the Talybont South halls are having to isolate

But Ms Cooper, from Taunton, Somerset, said she felt “left in the dark” about the spread of cases in student accommodation.

She said she was unable to use the university’s coronavirus screening service last week as she was not showing symptoms, but university staff and NHS Test and Trace have told her to self-isolate.

“They should’ve had this information in place earlier, it is too little too late. So we wouldn’t have had to panic and go and look for other support,” she said.

“They should’ve known we would get corona, even if you didn’t go out lots. People interact all the time here, just going to the laundry, or at the gym,”

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