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NBA Finals: LeBron James wins fourth career MVP award

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For the fourth time in his 17-year career, LeBron James has climbed the mountaintop.

lebron james

James and the Lakers coasted to a 109-93 victory over the Heat in Game 6 to win the 2020 NBA Finals. James finished the night with 28 points, 14 rebounds and 10 assists, extending his record of career triple-doubles in the NBA Finals to 11. He averaged 29.8 points, 11.8 rebounds and 8.5 assists, shooting 59.1% from the field for the series, winning his fourth career Finals MVP award.

The win puts James in second place by himself for career Finals MVP awards, trailing only Michael Jordan, who won the award six times. Three others have won the award three times: Magic Johnson, Shaquille O’Neal and Tim Duncan.

Lakers fans: Get SI’s special-edition L.A. Lakers 2020 NBA Champions commemorative issue here | SI Presents: Kobe Bryant Tribute issue

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Game ‘pre-bunks’ COVID-19 conspiracies as part of UK’s fight against fake news

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Game 'pre-bunks' COVID-19 conspiracies as part of UK's fight against fake news
Go Viral! visuals Credit: Cambridge/UK Cabinet Office

A new online game that puts players in the shoes of a purveyor of fake pandemic news is the latest tactic in efforts to tackle the deluge of coronavirus misinformation costing lives across the world.


The Go Viral! game has been developed by the University of Cambridge’s Social Decision-Making Lab in collaboration with the UK Cabinet Office and media collective DROG.

It builds on research from Cambridge psychologists that found by giving people a taste of the techniques used to spread fake news on social media, it increases their ability to identify and disregard misinformation in the future.

Go Viral! is launched on the heels of a new study from the team behind it, just published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied. The latest findings show that a single play of a similar game can reduce susceptibility to false information for at least three months.

“Fake news can travel faster and lodge itself deeper than the truth,” said Dr. Sander van der Linden, who leads the project and the Social Decision-Making Lab at Cambridge.

“Fact-checking is vital, but it comes too late and lies have already spread like the virus. We are aiming to pre-emptively debunk, or pre-bunk, misinformation by exposing people to a mild dose of the methods used to disseminate fake news. It’s what social psychologists call ‘inoculation theory’.”

The new 5-7 minute game introduces players to the basics of online manipulation in the era of coronavirus. It acts as a simple guide to common techniques: using emotionally charged language to stoke outrage and fear, deploying fake experts to sow doubt, and mining conspiracies for social media Likes.

“By using a simulated environment to show people how misinformation is produced, we can demystify it,” said Dr. Jon Roozenbeek, co-developer

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Athletes face emotional blow as pandemic uproots college sports

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Early mornings, late nights, countless hours of training. And now, perhaps nothing to show for it.

Where student-athletes are left after programs cut or postponed

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That’s a glimpse at the uncertainty for college athletes across the country who have had seasons derailed. In some cases, their programs have even been cut altogether as schools react to the health risks and financial ripples of COVID-19.

The pandemic has shaken the college sports scene to its core, dealing an emotional blow to athletes as they’re forced to stay on their toes about the status of their careers.

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Some college football conferences have made a loud return to action, but many athletes in lower revenue sports – the runners, swimmers, golfers, and soccer players – are still waiting to take the field or hear if they’ll be able to compete again.

Many athletic conferences have pushed non-football fall sports to the spring. But with CDC director Dr. Robert Redfield saying a vaccine won’t be widely available until mid-2021, even that timeframe could make it difficult to restart sports en masse while keeping everyone safe.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Along with the men's and women's swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men's and women's golf, and men's lightweight rowing.


© Provided by Connor LaMastra
Along with the men’s and women’s swim teams, Dartmouth discontinued men’s and women’s golf, and men’s lightweight rowing.

College football and COVID-19: A big, disjointed experiment exposes scientific, political gaps

Between the decisions made by schools, conferences, local and state officials or the CDC itself, the fates of so many athletic careers rest in the hands of higher powers.

Some students have already been dealt disappointing results.

‘A total slap in the face’

Wrestlers at Old Dominion, swimmers at UConn and baseball players at Boise State are all in the same boat. So are

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NFL Podcast: Week 5 Recap

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Subscribe to The Yahoo Sports NFL Podcast

The football gods give and the foot ball gods take away. That was as apparent as ever on Sunday in Week 5 as Alex Smith made his triumphant return to action after nearly two years away from the sport as a result of a gruesome leg injury. On the other side of that coin, only hours later, Dak Prescott suffered a gruesome ankle injury of his own and is now out for the season.

Terez Paylor & Charles Robinson recap all of the Week 5 games up until Sunday night including the Dallas Cowboys’ pyrrhic victory against the New York Giants, the Las Vegas Raiders stunning the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs, Russell Wilson and the Seattle Seahawks adding another exhibit to his MVP case against the Minnesota Vikings and the Atlanta Falcons cleaning house after suffering yet another loss, this time to the surprisingly frisky Carolina Panthers.

Stay up to date with the latest NFL news and coverage from Yahoo Sports on Twitter @YahooSportsNFL.

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Check out the rest of the Yahoo Sports Podcast family at https://apple.co/2Abi8jk or at yahoosports.com/podcasts

Andy Dalton will now be thrust into the spotlight as he takes over the starting QB job in Dallas after the injury to Dak Prescott. (Photo by Abbie Parr/Getty Images)

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Ohio state school board has 6 of 11 elected seats up for grabs

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Catherine Candisky
 
| The Columbus Dispatch

Voters are electing six members of the state Board of Education this year, including three representing the central Ohio area.

The half-dozen seats are among the 11 elected positions on the board. Another eight members are appointed by the governor.

The 19-member panel creates policy and makes recommendations for K-12 education, and hires the state superintendent.

More: Election 2020: The Columbus Dispatch Voter Guide

While members are elected in nonpartisan races, the board has been political at times. Most recently, the board sparred over a resolution ultimately approved 12-5 in July condemning hate speech and racism in schools, directing the Department of Education to review curriculum models and tests for racial bias, and requiring bias training for employees.

The resolution followed the death of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man killed while in the custody of Minneapolis police, triggering protests across the nation. Conservatives on the board said the resolution was a rush to judgment and questioned the extent of racism in schools.

In central Ohio’s 6th district, incumbent Antoinette Miranda of Columbus is seeking a second four-year term against challenger Alice Nicks of Galena. The district covers most of Franklin County and all of Delaware and Knox counties.

Miranda is a professor of school psychology and interim chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning at Ohio State University. She has more than 35 years of experience in K-12 and post-secondary education, including six years as a school psychologist.

Miranda said her priorities on the board include improving state report cards for schools and districts to make them more understandable for parents, educators and stakeholders and better reflect progress in schools. She also wants to advocate for districts as lawmakers tackle school-funding issues.

“The board doesn’t really vote on state funding, but it

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