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College Football Stars Putting Up Absurd Numbers in 2020 | Bleacher Report

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    John Raoux/Associated Press

    Several weeks into the college football season, the stars of 2020 are separating themselves from the rest of the pack, just like the championship contenders.

    With the Big Ten and Pac-12 set to join the fray soon, other big names will begin to surge to the top of the stat sheets. But for now, it’s an early season dominated by SEC, Big 12 and ACC playmakers.

    In some cases, like for Clemson quarterback and Heisman Trophy front-runner Trevor Lawrence, it’s expected. Other surprises are playing their way into superstardom, and some elite players are still having big seasons for teams off to subpar starts.

    A few sets of teammates are on here, too, but that’s just the way the stats are shaking out so far this season.

    With eligibility essentially out the door this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s going to be exciting to see which guys play their way into the top end of the conversation for the NFL draft. For others, it’s about building their reputation on the college gridiron. Plenty of guys on this list have national championship hopes remaining this year, as well.

    Let’s take a look at some college football stars putting up ridiculous numbers in the early season.

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    L.G. Patterson/Associated Press

    Georgia is the nation’s top defensive unit, full of difference-making playmakers who don’t pile up the stats but just embarrass opponents in the box scores. Alabama has a slew of former elite prospects all over its defense. LSU and Florida are off to awful starts but are known as mass producers of defensive talent.

    But the best defensive player in the SEC hails from unheralded Missouri.

    That would be hard-hitting linebacker Nick Bolton, who was a first-team All-SEC selection a year ago

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Nigeria’s Ogenyi Onazi looks to get his career ‘out of reverse gear’

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Nigeria's Ogenyi Onazi
Nigeria’s Ogenyi Onazi accepted a cut in his wages to join Danish Superliga club SønderjyskE

Danish Superliga club SønderjyskE has offered Nigeria international midfielder Ogenyi Onazi a new way forward after a four year spell in Turkey blighted by injury.

Injuries have seen Onazi’s career look like it has been thrown into reverse – moving from Lazio in Italy’s Serie A to Turkish sides Trabzonspor and then Denizlispor and now onto Denmark..

Despite the issues the 27-year-old remains philosophical about things and believes the Danish club are the ideal platform to revive his career.

“Injuries are inevitable because it’s something that happens a lot in football, but it’s not been fair to me,” Onazi, who has just signed a one year deal, told BBC Sport Africa.

“At the most important time in my career is when it happens to me and I have no proper explanation for this.”

Onazi was tipped as next big thing when he first shot to limelight at Italian side Lazio before breaking into his country’s senior side by winning the African Cup of Nations in 2013 and playing at the 2014 World Cup.

But his brilliant run in Brazil was ended by a late tackle from Blaise Matuidi during France’s win over the Super Eagles in the round of 16.

It started a litany of injuries in his career and came to the fore when he ruptured his achilles at Turkish side Trabzonspor in December 2016.

What followed were four fraught years as he attempted to find a way back from the Achilles injury that became the bane of his existence.

Taking a pay cut

His career has never been the same and revealed the nightmare including muscle and calf problems has made him “more hungry and determined to do well”.

“Coming from where it

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New Theory Suggests Tunguska Explosion Was A 656 Foot-Wide Asteroid’s Near-Miss With Earth

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In the morning of June 30, 1908, the ground trembled in Central Siberia, and a series of flying fireballs, causing a “frightful sound” of explosions, were observed in the sky above the Stony Tunguska River. Strange glowing clouds, colorful sunsets, and a weak luminescence in the night were reported as far as Europe.

Likely many thousand people in a radius of 1.500 kilometers (or 900 miles) observed the Tunguska Event. However, due to the remoteness of the affected area, eyewitness testimonies were collected only more than half of a century after the event, and most were second-hand oral accounts. In 2008, unpublished material collected by Russian ethnographer Sev’yan Vainshtein resurfaced, including some first-hand accounts of the event.

Despite its notoriety in pop-culture, hard scientific data covering the Tunguska Event is sparse. Since 1928 more than forty expeditions explored the site, taking samples from the soils, rocks, and even trees, with ambiguous results. Some seismic and air-pressure wave registrations survive, recorded immediately after the blast, and surveys of the devastated forest mapped some thirty years later.

Based on the lack of hard data, like a crater or a meteorite, and conflicting accounts, many theories of widely varying plausibility were proposed over time.

At the time of the event, international newspapers speculated about a volcanic eruption. Russian scientists, like Dr. Arkady Voznesensky, Director of the Magnetographic and Meteorological Observatory at Irkutsk where seismic waves of the explosion were recorded, speculated about a cosmic impact. In 1927, Russian mineralogist Leonid Alexejewitsch Kulik of the Russian Meteorological Institute, explained the event as the mid-air explosion of a meteorite, explaining the lack of an impact crater on the ground. In 1934, Soviet astronomers, based on Kulik’s work, proposed that a comet exploded in

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The Electoral College and the 2020 U.S. presidential race

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By Jan Wolfe



a person sitting on a wooden cutting board: FILE PHOTO: North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina


© Reuters/Jonathan Drake
FILE PHOTO: North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina

(Reuters) – In the United States, the winner of a presidential election is determined not by a national vote but through a system called the Electoral College, which allots “electoral votes” to all 50 states and the District of Columbia based on their population.

Complicating things further, a web of laws and constitutional provisions kick in to resolve particularly close elections.

Here are some of the rules that could decide the Nov. 3 contest between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger Joe Biden.

How does the Electoral College work?

There are 538 electoral votes, meaning 270 are needed to win the election. In 2016, President Donald Trump lost the national popular vote to Hillary Clinton but secured 304 electoral votes to her 227.

Technically, Americans cast votes for electors, not the candidates themselves. Electors are typically party loyalists who pledge to support the candidate who gets the most votes in their state. Each elector represents one vote in the Electoral College.

The Electoral College was a compromise between the nation’s founders, who fiercely debated whether the president should be picked by Congress or through a popular vote.

All but two states use a winner-take-all approach: The candidate that wins the most votes in that state gets all of its electoral votes. Maine and Nebraska use a more complex district-based allocation system that could result in their combined nine electoral votes being split between Trump and Biden.

Can electors go rogue?

Yes.

In 2016, seven of the 538 electors cast ballots for someone other than their state’s popular vote winner, an unusually high number.

Thirty-two states and the District of Columbia have

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Phyllis Landrieu, tireless advocate for education and children’s rights, dies at 86 | News

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Phyllis Landrieu, a businesswoman and activist whose causes included health care, education and the rights of children — along with a healthy dose of politics — died Saturday at Touro Infirmary. She was 86.

The cause of death has not been determined, her daughter Judy Landrieu Klein said.

Landrieu was “a woman of steel,” New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell said in a statement, describing Landrieu as “a passionate champion for our children and for early childhood education.”

The mother of 10 children, Landrieu was an unstinting advocate of early childhood education and children’s health. She also founded her own public-relations agency and was active in politics, serving as the first woman leader of the Louisiana Democratic State Central Committee and a member of the Democratic National Committee. She was a friend of Presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama.

“She was just an amazing bundle of joy and had a special force about her, but it was a joyful force,” former U.S. Sen. Mary Landrieu, a niece, said. “She approached everything with passion and vigor and energy.”

Landrieu became a passionate advocate for children’s well-being after the deaths of her sons Stephen and Scott, Klein said, explaining that her mother took on that cause as a way to work through her grief. Her work resulted in the creation of the Health and Education Alliance of Louisiana; she was its founding president.

Calling her work with that organization “an opportunity out of the darkness,” Landrieu wrote: “If I could relieve some child’s suffering, I could relieve some … of mine. Little by little, it worked. Every day, I keep moving in the direction of the children. There are so many children suffering, as I am, with pain and disappointment. In helping them, I am helping myself.”

“She was not exempt

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