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What Americans Think About A Coronavirus Vaccine And Wearing Masks

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BROOKVILLE, N.Y., Oct. 6, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Results of a breaking Long Island University Steven S. Hornstein Center for Policy, Polling and Analysis national poll on what Americans think about the coronavirus reveal that while there was uncertainty over taking a vaccine if it were available today, most respondents were confident that wearing masks reduces the spread of the virus.

Long Island University (PRNewsfoto/Long Island University)
Long Island University (PRNewsfoto/Long Island University)

MIXED CONFIDENCE IN POSSIBLE CORONAVIRUS VACCINE 
Americans were asked if they would agree to be vaccinated if an FDA approved coronavirus vaccine was available right now.  The result was a mixed response. Of the respondents, 38.2% said yes, 33.4% said no, and 28.4% said they didn’t know or gave no answer. Male respondents said yes at a higher rate (47%) than female respondents (31%).

THE MAJORITY OF AMERICANS (84%) ARE CONFIDENT THAT WEARING A MASK IN PUBLIC REDUCES THE SPREAD OF THE CORONAVIRUS
National poll results found that 84% of respondents said they believe that wearing a mask in public reduces the spread of the coronavirus, while 10% did not believe that wearing a mask in public makes a difference, and 6% said they were not sure.  Respondents with a household income above $100,000 showed confidence levels in masks at a higher rate (89%) than those with a household income below $100,000 (83%).

CONFIDENCE LEVEL OF WEARING MASKS IN PUBLIC TO REDUCE SPREAD OF CORONAVIRUS IS HIGHER IN NORTHEAST AND PACIFIC REGIONS; LOWER IN MIDWEST, SOUTH, AND MOUNTAIN REGIONS
Regional differences exist in Americans’ belief that wearing a mask in public reduces the spread of the coronavirus.  Respondents with the highest confidence level in wearing masks in public live in the Northeast (90%) and Pacific (89%) regions.  Respondents with lower confidence levels regarding wearing masks in public live in the Midwest (81%), South

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Future of Education: What Americans Think About Returning To School During A Pandemic

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With the school year starting up again, families are tacking how to handle their students going back to classrooms, in person or remotely. Pollster And Senior Vice President of Ipsos, Chris Jackson, joins Hill TV to discuss how Americans are feeling about sending their kids to school.

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Why so many top young Americans choose Germany on career path

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On the opening weekend of the 2021-21 Bundesliga season, there were six Americans in action. Gio Reyna scored his first Bundesliga goal for Borussia Dortmund, Tyler Adams helped RB Leipzig to an opening-round win, John Brooks was on duty for Wolfsburg, Timothy Chandler was a late sub for Eintracht Frankfurt, Josh Sargent started for Werder Bremen, and Chris Richards got 17 minutes as Bayern Munich brushed aside Schalke.

Cast your eye over the squad lists and academies up and down the Bundesliga, and there are Americans breaking through in 16 of the 18 top-flight teams; there are, at last count, 50 U.S.-qualified players in the top three German divisions.

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In recent years, German clubs in particular have made a mad scramble to sign the best, young U.S. soccer talent. Speak to players, coaches and agents, and each has a slightly different take on why there are so many Americans in the Bundesliga. You have the ease of work permits, the American mentality, the growing talent pool, the Jurgen Klinsmann effect of the early 2010s, legacies of the U.S. Army presence during the Cold War, the lack of transfer fees, the appeal of the U.S. market from a brand-advancement point of view and, of course, the Christian Pulisic factor.

Ultimately, every club in the Bundesliga wants to find their own Captain America.

The story and legacy of U.S. players in the Bundesliga

There is no exact science to