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Rangers buy out goalie Henrik Lundqvist, ending 15-year career in New York

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It’s the end of an era in New York.

The Rangers on Wednesday announced the buyout of goalie Henrik Lundqvist, who has spent the entirety of his sterling 15-year career with the Blueshirts. He will leave as the team’s most accomplished goalie ever, accumulating a 459-310-96 record, 23,509 saves, a 2.43 goals against average and a 91.8 save percentage.

The buyout of the final season of his seven-year, $59.5 million contract will free up $3 million in cap space for the Rangers in of 2020-21, per CapFriendly.com. It will create $1.5 million in dead cap hit the following season. With the move, the Rangers will have $25.7 million in cap space — fourth-most in the NHL — per Spotrac.

MORE: Lightning players upset at suggestion they didn’t win ‘real’ Stanley Cup

It’s uncertain whether Lundqvist will retire or choose to sift through the free agency market. The 2012 Vezina Trophy winner almost certainly will have suitors, but issues of team fit and cap space will be factors in whether he chooses to retire.

Should Lunqvist retire, he would do so as the sixth-winningest goalie in NHL history. That aptitude helped the Rangers reach the postseason in 11 of Lundqvist’s 15 seasons in New York, including two trips to the Eastern Conference finals and one to the Stanley Cup Final. The only thing missing was the Stanley Cup itself; the closest Lundqvist came to hoisting it came in 2014, when his Rangers lost to the Kings 4-1 in the Stanley Cup Final.

That certainly doesn’t detract from Lundqvist’s storied career, however. He leaves New York with multiple NHL and Rangers records. He is the only goaltender in NHL history to record 30 wins in each of his first seven seasons and the first with 11 straight 20-win seasons. He is also

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Rangers to buy out goalie Henrik Lundqvist, per reports; ends 15-year career in New York

Posted on

It’s the end of an era in New York.

Per multiple reports — the first from the New York Post — the Rangers on Wednesday will announce the buyout of goalie Henrik Lundqvist, who has spent the entirety of his sterling 15-year career with the Blueshirts. He will leave as the team’s most accomplished goalie ever, accumulating a 459-310-96 record, 23,509 saves, a 2.43 goals against average and a 91.8 save percentage.

The buyout of the final season of his seven-year, $59.5 million contract will free up $3 million in cap space for the Rangers in of 2020-21, per CapFriendly.com. It will create $1.5 million in dead cap hit the following season. With the move, the Rangers will have $25.7 million in cap space — fourth-most in the NHL — per Spotrac.

MORE: Lightning players upset at suggestion they didn’t win ‘real’ Stanley Cup

It’s uncertain whether Lundqvist will retire or choose to sift through the free agency market. The 2012 Vezina Trophy winner almost certainly will have suitors, but issues of team fit and cap space will be factors in whether he chooses to retire.

Should Lunqvist retire, he would do so as the sixth-winningest goalie in NHL history. That aptitude helped the Rangers reach the postseason in 11 of Lundqvist’s 15 seasons in New York, including two trips to the Eastern Conference finals and one to the Stanley Cup Final. The only thing missing was the Stanley Cup itself; the closest Lundqvist came to hoisting it came in 2014, when his Rangers lost to the Kings 4-1 in the Stanley Cup Final.

That certainly doesn’t detract from Lundqvist’s storied career, however. He leaves New York with multiple NHL and Rangers records. He is the only goaltender in NHL history to record 30 wins in each of his first

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Why mid- and low-major college basketball programs are in big trouble without buy games

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Montana Grizzlies men’s basketball coach Travis DeCuire stayed close to his phone last week. The Grizzlies’ seventh-year coach was busy trying to salvage his Division I program’s nonconference schedule one week after the NCAA approved a Nov. 25 start date that was delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic.

In most years, the 49-year-old DeCuire would be asking opposing coaches and administrators the typical questions about the potential nonconference matchups that anchor his schedule. How much are you willing to pay? Commercial or chartered flight? How many hotel rooms for the program?

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The pandemic has changed those conversations, and DeCuire’s exchanges last week had a different tone. He wanted to know if schools were frequently testing players for COVID-19. What are the rates in your community? Can you promise that my team won’t have to run through multiple airports to get to your school?

“I want to know that they’re testing and the results are accurate,” he said. “I want to know that they’re negative before they get on the bus or the plane, if they come to play us.”

When Dan Gavitt, the NCAA’s senior vice president of men’s basketball, announced that the season would commence two weeks after its original start date, the sport’s Power 5 programs — with the assistance of their ample budgets — began devising ideas about bubbles and regional matchups that aim to secure the health and safety of participants by limiting exposure.

For DeCuire and other mid-major coaches throughout the country, the road to the 2020-21 season isn’t that simple. The financial pipeline that will allow major programs to plow forward and play games isn’t accessible to non-Power 5 programs. There are more schools like Montana than like Duke in the Division I landscape of 350-plus college basketball programs.

Per the Knight