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University warns about college students trying to contract COVID-19 to make money donating plasma with antibodies

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Brigham Young University-Idaho warned on Monday about accounts of college students “intentionally” trying to contract COVID-19 in order to make money by donating plasma with antibodies. 

The Idaho university issued a statement saying officials were “deeply troubled” by the alleged behavior and “is actively seeking evidence of such conduct among our student body.”

Students who are determined to have intentionally exposed themselves or others to the virus will be immediately suspended from the university and may be permanently dismissed,” the university stated.

“The contraction and spread of COVID-19 is not a light matter,” the statement continued. “Reckless disregard for health and safety will inevitably lead to additional illness and loss of life in our community.”

University officials noted that they had previously cautioned last month that if Idaho or Madison County continue to experience surges in cases, the university may have to switch to fully online learning. 

The release also encouraged students who are participating in this behavior to consult financial and mental health resources, saying, “There is never a need to resort to behavior that endangers health or safety in order to make ends meet.”

Brigham Young University-Idaho has confirmed 109 COVID-19 cases among students and 22 cases among employees.

The Food and Drug Administration permitted convalescent plasmas from COVID-19 survivors to be used as an emergency therapy for those with coronavirus. The FDA states that the plasma that has antibodies “may be effective in treating COVID-19 and that the known and potential benefits of the product outweigh the known and potential risks.”

Two potential plasma donation locations near the university are the Grifols Biomat USA Rexburg location and the BioLife Plasma Services, NPR reported. The first’s website says it gives donors $100 per visit and East Idaho News reported the latter provides $200 for each of the

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College football schedule 2020: The 28 games already postponed or canceled due to COVID-19

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With COVID-19 still raging across the country, it was long expected that many college football games would be postponed if not outright canceled over the course of the season. As we enter Week 5 of the 2020 season, there have now been 24 games affected by COVID-19 with most postponements coming as a result of contact tracing protocols that require players to quarantine for 14 days if they are deemed to have been in high-risk contact with someone who has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Some teams, such as Houston, Memphis, Baylor, FAU, Virginia Tech, Arkansas State, Charlotte and Rice have already experienced multiple game disruptions. Even those who have not seen a game postponed yet are living day-by-day as COVID-19 test results and subsequent contact tracing dictate if — and how effectively — they will be able to play as scheduled.

Some leagues, such as the Big 12 and SEC, have established minimum player thresholds requiring that teams have a certain number of players available at specific positions. The disruptions have highlighted the issues facing the 2020 season with two of the Power Five conferences (four overall) still yet to begin play. The SEC is scheduled to start on Sept. 26 with the Big Ten slated to return the weekend of Oct. 24 and the Pac-12 eyeing a return on Nov. 6.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 announced they plan to conduct daily testing, which should help programs identify positive cases quickly and reduce the burden of contact tracing. But even with daily testing, successfully holding a season with no bye weeks leading up to the College Football Playoff will be a challenge.

Here is the full list of college football game postponements.

ULM at Troy

Sept. 5

Dec. 5

SMU at TCU

Sept. 11

TBD

NC

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Applied DNA Secures $1.0+ Million in COVID-19 Surveillance Testing Annualized Revenue, Builds Sales Pipeline for Test Kit and Testing-as-a-Service

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– Announces Completion of Initial New York State Department of Health Inspection of Clinical Lab Subsidiary –

Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. (NASDAQ: APDN) (“Applied DNA” or the “Company”), a leader in Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-based DNA manufacturing that enables in vitro diagnostics, pre-clinical nucleic acid-based therapeutic drug candidates, supply chain security, anti-counterfeiting, and anti-theft technology, announced that Applied DNA Clinical Laboratories, LLC (“ADCL”), its wholly-owned subsidiary, has secured COVID-19 surveillance testing contracts under its testing-as-a-service (“TaaS”) offering that are estimated to generate more than $1.0 million in total annualized revenue beginning October 1, 2020. The Company’s surveillance testing revenue expectation is contingent on full-term participation by TaaS customers, including:

  • Private schools based in Long-Island, N.Y., including Harbor Country Day School. Education customers comprise the bulk of the Company’s current testing volume;

  • Several New York State-based small enterprises and private clients.

Unlike diagnostic testing, which looks for the occurrence of COVID-19 at the individual level, surveillance testing looks for infection within a defined population or community and can be used for making health management decisions at the population level. Surveillance testing does not require a prescription. In surveillance testing, pooled test results are returned to the sponsoring organization in the aggregate, not directly to the individual, and may be performed without CLIA certification.

Concurrently, the Company is executing on a sales and marketing strategy to build a pipeline of LineaTM COVID-19 Diagnostic Assay Kit (“Assay Kit”) and TaaS opportunities through:

  • Outreach to independent and hospital laboratories in COVID-19 hotspots nationally and regionally to offer an additional diagnostic kit supply line;

  • Outreach to local laboratories to construct a reference laboratory relationship for overflow testing;

  • Deployment of testing at Stony Brook University in accordance with a recently signed Master Services Agreement.

“Our capacity to perform COVID-19 surveillance testing is grounded in self-collection

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‘Super-spreader’ event led to N.J. college’s COVID-19 outbreak, president says

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About 125 COVID-19 cases at Monmouth University have been traced to an off-campus “super-spreader event” that shut down in-person classes and canceled athletics, according to campus officials.

Monmouth had reported a total of 39 confirmed cases as of Sept. 25. Since then, the number has ballooned to 291 cases, including 166 people who tested positive and are still in isolation, president Patrick Leahy wrote Friday in a letter to students.

In addition to the confirmed cases, 206 students at the private college were identified through contract tracing as being at high risk for contracting the virus. They are required to quarantine as a precaution, Leahy wrote.

About 125 of the cases were traced to a gathering about two weeks ago at a private residence, said Tara Peters, the university’s associate vice president for communications. Not all of those people attended the gathering, but they eventually came into contact with someone who did, she said.

Monmouth’s struggle to contain the virus’ spread underscores the logistical challenges that colleges face in relying on students to follow safety protocols when they’re not on campus.

“Moving forward, we will need 100% cooperation from our campus community in order to resume our fall semester as planned,” Leahy wrote.

Monmouth opened the semester with the majority of its courses online, but allowed indoor dining on campus, where students also had access to the gymnasium and pool. It temporarily shut down those facilities at the end of September and announced it would postpone sporting events through at least Wednesday. All courses were shifted online through Oct. 14.

The university also began offering free virus testing for all students and staff with no appointments needed.

Leahy hopes to make a decision soon on whether to reopen facilities and resume athletics and club activities, he wrote.

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College football schedule 2020: The 27 games already postponed or canceled due to COVID-19

Posted on

ncaa-football.jpg
Getty Images

With COVID-19 still raging across the country, it was long expected that many college football games would be postponed if not outright canceled over the course of the season. As we enter Week 5 of the 2020 season, there have now been 24 games affected by COVID-19 with most postponements coming as a result of contact tracing protocols that require players to quarantine for 14 days if they are deemed to have been in high-risk contact with someone who has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Some teams, such as Houston, Memphis, Baylor, FAU, Virginia Tech, Arkansas State, Charlotte and Rice have already experienced multiple game disruptions. Even those who have not seen a game postponed yet are living day-by-day as COVID-19 test results and subsequent contact tracing dictate if — and how effectively — they will be able to play as scheduled.

Some leagues, such as the Big 12 and SEC, have established minimum player thresholds requiring that teams have a certain number of players available at specific positions. The disruptions have highlighted the issues facing the 2020 season with two of the Power Five conferences (four overall) still yet to begin play. The SEC is scheduled to start on Sept. 26 with the Big Ten slated to return the weekend of Oct. 24 and the Pac-12 eyeing a return on Nov. 6.

The Big Ten and Pac-12 announced they plan to conduct daily testing, which should help programs identify positive cases quickly and reduce the burden of contact tracing. But even with daily testing, successfully holding a season with no bye weeks leading up to the College Football Playoff will be a challenge.

Here is the full list of college football game postponements.

ULM at Troy

Sept. 5

Dec. 5

SMU at TCU

Sept. 11

TBD

NC

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