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Tech Employment Data Contradict Need For Quick H-1B Visa Rules

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New government data show the low unemployment rate in computer occupations contradicts Trump administration claims an economic emergency requires the quick implementation of new H-1B visa rules. A new analysis indicates the government’s own data do not support the claims made in the regulations, which makes it more likely federal courts will block the new rules.

On October 8, 2020, the Department of Labor (DOL) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) published “interim final” rules to restrict H-1B visas, asserting a “good cause” exception to the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) to allow the H-1B rules to go into effect quickly without permitting the public to comment. DOL and DHS cited an emergency need to address unemployment as a reason for bypassing the normal rulemaking process.

Low Unemployment Rate in Computer Occupations: “The U.S. unemployment rate for individuals in computer occupations stood at 3.5% in September 2020, not changed significantly from the 3% unemployment rate in January 2020 (before the pandemic spread in the U.S.),” according to an analysis of the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Current Population Survey by the National Foundation for American Policy (NFAP). “A similar measure of the U.S. unemployment rate in computer and mathematical occupations, which appears on the BLS website, also found a rate of 3% in January 2020 and 3.5% in September 2020. The rates are well below the unemployment rate of 7.8% for non-computer occupations.”

Approximately two-thirds of H-1B visa holders work in computer-related occupations, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), but the DHS and DOL rules spend much time citing the

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Scientists return from Arctic with wealth of climate data

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BERLIN (AP) — An icebreaker carrying scientists on a year-long international effort to study the high Arctic has returned to its home port in Germany carrying a wealth of data that will help researchers better predict climate change in the decades to come.

The RV Polarstern arrived Monday in the North Sea port of Bremerhaven, from where she set off more than a year ago prepared for bitter cold and polar bear encounters — but not for the pandemic lockdowns that almost scuttled the mission half-way through.

“We basically achieved everything we set out to do,” the expedition’s leader, Markus Rex, told The Associated Press by satellite phone as it left the polar circle last week. “We conducted measurements for a whole year with just a short break.”

The ship had to break away from its position in the far north for three weeks in May to pick up supplies and rotate team members after coronavirus restrictions disrupted carefully laid travel plans, but that didn’t cause significant problems to the mission, he said.


“We’re bringing back a trove of data, along with countless samples of ice cores, snow and water,” said Rex, an atmospheric scientist at Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Ocean Research that organized the expedition.

More than 300 scientists from 20 countries, including the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China took part in the 150-million-euro ($177-million) expedition to measure conditions in one of the most remote and hostile parts of the planet over the course of a whole year.

Much of the information will be used to improve scientists’ models of global warming, particularly in the Arctic, where change has been happening at a faster pace than elsewhere on the planet.

As part of the expedition, known by its acronym MOSAiC, the Polarstern anchored to

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Department for Education’s handling of pupil data ruled illegal

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Video: How does data blunder affect battle against Covid-19? (PA Media)

How does data blunder affect battle against Covid-19?

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The Department for Education broke the law in its mishandling of the national database containing details of every school pupil in England, the Information Commissioner’s Office has concluded in a highly critical report.

The report marks the second time in less than a year that the DfE has been publicly rebuked by the privacy watchdog for failing to adhere to data protection laws.

After an investigation triggered by complaints from groups including Liberty, the ICO found that the DfE had failed to comply with sections of the general data protection regulation (GDPR). It said there was “no clear picture of what data is held by the DfE” and that its handling of millions of pupil records “could result in multiple data breaches”.

Related: Department of Education criticised for secretly sharing children’s data

“The audit found that data protection was not being prioritised and this had severely impacted the DfE’s ability to comply with the UK’s data protection laws,” the ICO said.

The audit lists more than 130 recommendations for the DfE to improve its data safeguarding, with 32 classed as urgent and 57 as high priority by the watchdog.

Sam Grant, the policy and campaigns manager of Liberty, said: “This report displays a shocking failure of privacy protections, which is dangerous for our rights.

“The type of data collected by the DfE can reveal a huge amount of sensitive personal information about us, and often about children and young people. The government has routinely misused this data to enforce cruel and oppressive policies like the hostile environment. This cavalier attitude to our personal information puts people, including the most marginalised, at risk.”

According to the ICO,

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University in Gujarat gets Supercomputer ‘Param’; To help in AI, big data education and research

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a group of people sitting posing for the camera: At present, Marwadi University has 400 students every year taking admission in the Computer & IT Department and 60 students in Computer Applications.


© Provided by The Financial Express
At present, Marwadi University has 400 students every year taking admission in the Computer & IT Department and 60 students in Computer Applications.

By Dr. RB Jadeja

The Gujarat Council on Science and Technology (GUJCOST) of the Gujarat Government has granted Marwadi University with supercomputer ‘Param’. With this, Marwadi University is amongst only a handful of universities in the state to have the facility of a supercomputer. This facility will be equipped with a Param Shavak system developed at the Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) for high-performance computing and deep learning with x86 based latest Intel processor, 98 GB RAM, 16 TB storage, Nvidia based co-processing accelerator technologies, and software development environment.

Supercomputers support computation of large datasets, terabytes, or petabytes of data, with billions and billions of mathematical operations over several times faster than a regular Laptop or Desktop. The distinguishing feature behind supercomputing with magnified speed is the parallel processing of the computing operations.

With such facilities, the students of UG/PG level will receive training and lectures on emerging topics in HPC, DL, and software development, including parallel programming, programming models, algorithms, hardware architecture, and its impact on code design choices, high-quality software development in collaborative environments, visualization, and workflow, additionally creating a research opportunity for the faculty members/ researcher.

At present, Marwadi University has 400 students every year taking admission in the Computer & IT Department and 60 students in Computer Applications. Estimated around 20% of these students undertake projects on AI/ML/DL or which some may utilize supercomputing facilities then approximately 90 students are directly involved. Besides, 100 students every year in AI & Big Data class whose projects are directly involved with such a facility. Over and above, 600 students from Electrical, Mechanical, Pharmacy, and Science streams of

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Analyzing Tesla’s Disappointing 3Q20 Unit Sales Data

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First and foremost, it was a miss.  That’s why TSLA shares are trading lower today.  The Internet was full yesterday of buffoons screaming about a deliveries number “in the 140s” and Tesla’s report of 139,300 units delivered in the third quarter falls short of that estimate.  The “whisper” estimate for Tesla’s 3Q2020 deliveries was higher—north of 145,000 units—but I won’t dishonor my beloved profession of equity analysis by naming the buffoons who pumped TSLA shares yesterday. 

The reported deliveries figure does imply a 43.3% year-on-year gain in unit sales for Tesla.  That said, Tesla’s own material shows an annual rated capacity of 690,000 units as of the end of the second quarter of 2020.  That implies a quarterly run-rate of 172,500 units of capacity.  

Tesla first divulged its annualized run-rate capacity in its 3Q2019 earnings deck.  Then the company rated that capacity as 440,000 units globally with capacity to produce 350,000 Model 3/Y units and 90,000 S/X units

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