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Game, Set And Match. The Business Masters Where European Are The World Champions

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With his 13th French Open tennis title at Roland Garros this weekend, Spain’s Rafael Nadal has equalled Roger Federer’s record of 20 Grand Slam men’s titles. Croatia’s Novak Djokovic, with 17 Grand Slams to his name will need at least another year if he is to catch up on his rivals.

Nadal won his first French Open tennis title in 2005. In the past 15 years, few things in the world of sport have been as sure. When it comes to men’s tennis, Europeans are the Masters of the Court.

There is a similar pattern of European domination in the Masters of Management (MiM). This pre-experience business degree has seen tremendous growth in the last decade, as college seniors and those a year or two out of university look to broaden their skills sets and strengthen their networks rather than wait to do an MBA. With the current economic downturn, many of the leading business schools attending the CentreCourt Specialized Masters Festival on October 13 & 14 are reporting record application volume for this often shorter and more affordable alternative.

In the same year that Rafael Nadal won his first Grand Slam, the Financial Times published its first Masters in Management ranking. HEC Paris took the top spot ahead of French rival, ESCP Business School. There were only 25 schools in the ranking, all of them from Europe (at the time the CEMS global alliance was predominantly made up of European schools).

Fifteen years later, and the FT MiM ranking now includes 90 institutions from across the globe, and sees the University of St Gallen crowned #1 for

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Paul Lawrie to call time on European Tour career after Scottish Open

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Former Open champion Paul Lawrie will call time on his European Tour career after completing his 620th appearance in this week’s ASI Scottish Open.

Lawrie, who lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie in 1999 and won seven other titles as well as being part of Europe’s ‘Miracle at Medinah’ in the 2012 Ryder Cup, has been hampered by a back injury in recent years and will focus his attention on the senior circuit from now on.

The 51-year-old is exempt for the Open Championship until the age of 60 but has yet to decide whether he will continue to compete in the game’s oldest major.

Scotland’s Paul Lawrie kisses the trophy after winning the 1999 Open Championship at Carnoustie (Ben Curtis/PA)

“There are a lot of factors behind the decision, the main one being that I don’t feel I can be competitive week in, week out at this level,” Lawrie said after an opening two-over-par 73 at the Renaissance Club.

“My back is not very good, I’ve got a herniated disc and I struggle to practice enough. I’m not able to hit the amount of balls I need. I’m not particularly talented so I lose my game quite quickly.

“I need to hit hundreds of balls but if I hit 50 or 60 now I have to go and sit down and come back in the afternoon.

“I’m also very busy off the course and I enjoy that more than the golf these days.

“To have played 620 events is not a bad innings considering I turned pro (in 1986) with a five handicap and didn’t think I’d play any. I haven’t been a great player, but I’ve been decent and that’s all you can ask for.

“I’m kind of almost pleased that I’m 51 and not 22 the

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Paul Lawrie: Scot to end European Tour career after 620 appearances

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Emotional Lawrie calls time on his European Tour career

Former Open champion Paul Lawrie says his “body is in bits” as he confirmed he will retire from the European Tour after this week’s Scottish Open.

The 51-year-old Scot, who lifted the Claret Jug at Carnoustie in 1999 and won seven other titles, has struggled with a back injury in recent years.

After his 620th Tour appearance, he will focus on the senior circuit.

“The main factor is I don’t feel I can be competitive week in, week out at this level,” said Lawrie.

“My back is not very good, I’ve got a herniated disc and I struggle to practise enough. I’m not able to hit the amount of balls I need. I’m not particularly talented so I lose my game quite quickly.

“I’m also very busy off the course and I enjoy that more than the golf these days.”

Lawrie – who posted an opening two-over-par 73 at the Renaissance Club in East Lothian – has an exemption for the Open Championship until 60, but is undecided over whether he will continue to play in the game’s oldest major.

He claimed his last European Tour title in the Johnnie Walker Championship at Gleneagles in 2012, the same year was part of Europe’s ‘Miracle at Medinah’ in the Ryder Cup.

“To have played 620 events is not a bad innings considering I turned pro [in 1986] with a five handicap and didn’t think I’d play any,” he added. “I haven’t been a great player, but I’ve been decent and that’s all you can ask for.

“I’m kind of almost pleased that I’m 51 and not 22 the way it’s going. Technology has been unbelievable. My body is in bits and I’m still hitting it the same distance as I did when