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Francisco Cervelli announces retirement | Miami Marlins

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Marlins catcher Francisco Cervelli, who missed the final month of the season due to a concussion, announced his retirement on Saturday.
Through his Instagram page, Cervelli released a statement, citing it was a “difficult decision” to step aside after spending 13 seasons at the Major League level.
The 34-year-old signed

Marlins catcher Francisco Cervelli, who missed the final month of the season due to a concussion, announced his retirement on Saturday.

Through his Instagram page, Cervelli released a statement, citing it was a “difficult decision” to step aside after spending 13 seasons at the Major League level.

The 34-year-old signed as a free agent with the Marlins in December, and he started the season as Jorge Alfaro’s backup. When Alfaro tested positive for COVID-19, Cervelli’s playing time increased. But on Aug. 22, he sustained a concussion and was placed on the 60-day injured list soon after. Cervelli has missed significant time due to concussions in each of his last three seasons.

“Today, I want to share the difficult decision I’ve made to end my career as a professional baseball player,” Cervelli wrote. “I feel it’s important to share this with you, the fans, because your support throughout my 18-year-long [professional] career has meant so much — you helped make my journey possible.”

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Today, I want to share the difficult decision I’ve made to end my career as a professional baseball player. I feel it’s important to share this with you, the fans, because your support throughout my 18-year long career has meant so much – you helped make my journey possible.   During my career, I encountered injuries and made some bad decisions. But, I also learned so much. This game has brought me endless joy and happiness. I’ve received incredible support by so many,

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Marlins’ Francisco Cervelli announces retirement to put ‘my health before my career’

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Miami Marlins catcher and 13-year MLB veteran Francisco Cervelli announced Saturday on his personal Instagram page that he is retiring from professional baseball after his latest bout with concussions.

Included in one of his posts is a two-minute, 30-second video with highlights from his big-league career, which included stints with the New York Yankees (2008-2014), Pittsburgh Pirates (2015-2019), Atlanta Braves (2019) and Marlins (2020). The Yankees signed him as an international free agent in 2002.

“Today, I retire happy and fully satisfied, because I gave my heart and soul to this wonderful game,” Cervelli wrote. “I am retiring because the time has come to put my health before my career. For a long time, I put baseball first, through countless concussions and injuries, because this game was my life; my whole world. But it’s clear to me now that my future holds so much more. For the first time in a long time, I know my health and wellness needs to be the leadoff. It’s time.”

The Marlins signed Cervelli, 34, this offseason with the hopes he would be a veteran presence in a youth-laden clubhouse that was looking to surprise teams this year.

He produced on the field, hitting .245 with three home runs and seven RBI while helping a young pitching staff settle in during this 60-game, pandemic-shortened season.

But on Aug. 23, he landed on the injured list with a concussion, marking the seventh time in 10 years that he was sidelined due to a concussion or concussion-related symptoms.

“I told Francisco I want him to be healthy, but I want him to have a great life,” Marlins manager Don Mattingly said in early September, a few days before the team moved Cervelli to the 60-day IL and effectively ended his season. “He’s already had a great

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Accreditors place City College of San Francisco on ‘enhanced monitoring’ for its dire fiscal status

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Three years after City College of San Francisco emerged from an accreditation crisis that nearly shut it down, accreditors have placed the school on “enhanced monitoring” because its finances are in the danger zone.

City College scored in the lowest “at-risk” category in a financial analysis by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges, which in 2017 renewed the school’s all-important accreditation for another seven years.

The new monitoring requirement imposed by the commission means City College has until Dec. 4 to explain how it will address six problems that are keeping the school financially unstable.

Not only did salaries eat up more than 92% of total expenditures in recent years, but there has been “multiple leadership turnover” and an audit showing severe financial losses.

The commission also found that over three years, deficits averaged $13.3 million, and cash plunged from $53 million to $575,000. Also, the college ran at a deficit of -8.3%.

Mark Rocha, who was hired as chancellor in 2017 after the five-year accrediting crisis came to an end, resigned under pressure in March after a series of debacles in which he both cut classes and tried to increase executive salaries with little to no public notice.

In her Sept. 23 letter informing interim Chancellor Raj Vurdien of the new status, Stephanie Droker, president of the accrediting commission, thanked Vurdien for his candor and the updates he has provided on the college’s fiscal condition.

“I have found our conversations to be very productive and I look forward to supporting your efforts… to address the institution’s fiscal issues,” Droker wrote.

In turn, Vurdien posted Droker’sletter on the City College website with a response he wrote intended to reassure the public.

City College “is confident it can address the financial issues outlined in this letter,” he wrote, adding