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Without nuclear power, the world’s climate challenge will get a whole lot harder

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The Covid-19 crisis not only delivered an unprecedented shock to the world economy. It also underscored the scale of the climate challenge we face: Even in the current deep recession, global carbon emissions remain unsustainable.



a sunset in the background: White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. - Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)


© Sebastien Berda/AFP/Getty Images
White steam billows from the Cattenom nuclear power plant, at sunset in Cattenom, eastern France, on June 2, 2020. – Cattenom is the ninth largest nuclear power station in the world. (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA / AFP) (Photo by SEBASTIEN BERDA/AFP via Getty Images)

If the world is to meet energy security and climate goals, clean energy must be at the core of post-Covid-19 economic recovery efforts. Strong growth in wind and solar energy and in the use of electric cars gives us grounds for hope, as does the promise of emerging technologies like hydrogen and carbon capture. But the scale of the challenge means we cannot afford to exclude any available technologies, including nuclear power — the world’s second-largest source of low-carbon electricity after hydropower.

The power sector is the key to the clean energy transition. It is the single largest source of global emissions because most electricity is generated from fossil fuels. By significantly expanding the amount of electricity produced from low-carbon sources, we can help to reduce emissions not only from power generation, but also from sectors like transport, where low-carbon electricity can now fuel cars, trucks and buses.

This is a major undertaking. Low-carbon electricity generation will need to triple by 2040 to put the world on track to reach energy and climate goals. That is the equivalent of adding Japan’s entire power system to the global grid every year. It is very difficult to see how this can be done without a considerable contribution from nuclear power.

Nuclear power generated a near-record amount of electricity

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Stephen Curry’s Trainer Says Warriors Star Has ‘A Lot Left’ in NBA Career | Bleacher Report

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Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry (30) dribbles the ball up the court against the Toronto Raptors during the second half of an NBA basketball game in San Francisco, Thursday, March 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Jeff Chiu/Associated Press

Stephen Curry has officially logged more than a decade in the NBA, and those close to him see the three-time NBA champion and two-time MVP continuing his masterful run for quite a bit longer.

While Curry has previously said he wants to pay at least 16 seasons—the same length as his father Dell Curry spent in the league—his trainer, Brandon Payne, believes that may be setting the bar too low. During an interview with NBC Sports’ Tom Haberstroh on The Habershow podcast last week, Payne said Curry’s body hasn’t reached its peak yet.

“He’s a young 32,” Payne said (h/t NBC Sports Bay Area’s Drew Shiller) “He’s still gaining strength, he’s still gaining power, he’s still getting faster. Those aren’t things you see out of guys that are 32 years old. He’s still refining movement patterns, and all athletes develop at different speeds.”

Payne noted Curry has “got a lot left” and that he wasn’t just saying that because he’s his friend and trainer.

Even if there were a concern about years of high-level basketball stressing Curry’s body, he only played five games this season because of hand injury in October.

During Curry’s previous full season, the guard posted 27.3 points, 5.3 rebounds and 5.2 assists per game. The Warriors are hoping a healthy Curry and Klay Thompson can help extend their title window a bit longer. Payne has given no reason to doubt that assessment.

“If you saw him right now physically—and we don’t put a whole lot out there on Instagram, there are reasons we don’t—he’s getting