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Missouri University Of Science And Technology Receives $300 Million Gift, The Largest In Missouri Higher Education History

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Missouri University of Science and Technology(Missouri S and T) announced today that it had received a $300 million donation, the largest single gift in the history of Missouri higher education. St. Louis businessman and Missouri S and T alum Fred Kummer and his wife June are giving the money to a foundation they created that will support several initiatives at the university.

The Kummers’ gift will be administered by The Kummer Institute Foundation. Funds from the foundation will support several new initiatives at Missouri S&T, including:

  • A new research and development entity modeled after other university-affiliated centers like the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. The new organization will be the home to four new research centers – focused on infrastructure, advanced manufacturing, artificial intelligence and autonomous systems, and environmental and resource sustainability.
  • The Kummer School of Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development, a new school that will combine academic programs in business with new programs related to innovation and entrepreneurship at the bachelor’s, master’s and Ph.D. levels.
  • Scholarships, fellowships and other enhancement for high-achieving undergraduate and graduate students.
  • Expansion of the university’s online degree programs.
  • New research faculty positions.
  • Expansion and renovation of existing facilities along with construction of new buildings and labs.
  • Enhanced community outreach through student-community engagement, a lecture series, and a shuttle service between S&T and St. Louis to bring students from the metropolitan area to Rolla

“This gift is transformative for S&T, the Rolla region and our state,” said Dr. Mo Dehghani, Missouri S&T chancellor. “For nearly 150 years, Missouri S&T has been known as the state’s premier technological university. Now, thanks

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Smith College receives $50M gift; largest individual donation in its history

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NORTHAMPTON — Smith College has received a $50 million endowment gift — the largest individual donation in the school’s 155-year history.

The college announced Tuesday that the gift — $40 million designated for student financial aid and $10 million to “re-envision” the school’s career development program — is from an alumna who wishes to remain anonymous. It was made through a private foundation.

“I could not be more grateful for this alumna’s generosity, vision and belief in the power of a Smith education,” Kathleen McCartney, Smith College president, said in a statement.

“Her investment in the college will allow us to make a giant stride in equalizing the Smith experience for students from low- and middle-income backgrounds.”

The announcement included a statement from the donor saying, “Smith had a meaningful impact on my life, both personally and professionally, and I feel an obligation to pay it back.”

One of Smith College’s goals, according to McCartney, is to admit qualified students without regard to family circumstances, referred to as “need-blind admissions.”

“It is my deepest wish,” McCartney said, “that this alumna’s generosity will inspire others to help the college reach this goal.”

Smith College, which enrolls more than 2,500 undergraduates from nearly every state and more than 70 other countries, said it awarded more than $80 million in federal, state and college aid to 69% percent of its students during the last academic year.

Established in 1871 and opening four years later, Smith College has educated notable authors, journalists, activists, politicians, philanthropists, actresses, filmmakers, academics, CEOs, two First Ladies and recipients of the Pulitzer Prize, Academy Award, Emmy Award, MacArthur Grant, Peabody Award, and Tony Award.

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Anthony Averett receives career-high workload as injuries force line-up tinkering

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Ravens offensive snap counts vs. Washington Football Team 10/4/20



a group of people playing football on a field: Ravens' Mark Andrews makes a touchdown catch in second quarter as Washington's #54, Kevin Pierre-Louis attempts to defend against the play.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens’ Mark Andrews makes a touchdown catch in second quarter as Washington’s #54, Kevin Pierre-Louis attempts to defend against the play.

Orlando Brown Jr. T 57

Matt Skura C 57



a group of football players playing a football game: Ravens' Mark Andrews, left, catches a 22-yards touchdown pass in front of Washington's Troy Apke, right, and Shaun Dion Hamilton (#51) in the third quarter.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens’ Mark Andrews, left, catches a 22-yards touchdown pass in front of Washington’s Troy Apke, right, and Shaun Dion Hamilton (#51) in the third quarter.

D.J. Fluker T 57



a group of football players on the field: Ravens Mark Andrews scores a touchdown on a catch in the third quarter against Washington at FedEx Field on Oct. 4, 2020.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens Mark Andrews scores a touchdown on a catch in the third quarter against Washington at FedEx Field on Oct. 4, 2020.

Tyre Phillips G 50

Bradley Bozeman G 47



a group of football players on the field: Ravens' Jaylon Ferguson, right, sacks Washington quarterback Dwayne Haskins Jr., left, for a loss of 18 yards.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens’ Jaylon Ferguson, right, sacks Washington quarterback Dwayne Haskins Jr., left, for a loss of 18 yards.

Lamar Jackson QB 47



a group of football players on the field: Ravens' Jaylon Ferguson, right, sacks Washington quarterback Dwayne Haskins Jr., left, for a loss of 18 yards in the fourth quarter.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens’ Jaylon Ferguson, right, sacks Washington quarterback Dwayne Haskins Jr., left, for a loss of 18 yards in the fourth quarter.

Marquise Brown WR 43

Nick Boyle TE 38

Mark Andrews TE 37

Willie Snead IV WR 32



a football player running on a field: Ravens' Lamar Jackson, right, tries to push away Washington's Nate Orchard, left, in the fourth quarter.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens’ Lamar Jackson, right, tries to push away Washington’s Nate Orchard, left, in the fourth quarter.

Myles Boykin WR 31

Patrick Ricard FB 25

Gus Edwards RB 22

J.K. Dobbins RB 21

Devin Duvernay WR 16

Mark Ingram II RB 14

Patrick Mekari G 11

Robert Griffin III QB 10



a group of baseball players standing on top of a field: Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson, left, and Washington's Dwayne Haskins Jr., congratulate each other after the game.


© Kenneth K. Lam/Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson, left, and Washington’s Dwayne Haskins Jr., congratulate each other after the game.

Ben Powers G 7

Ben Bredeson G 4

James Proche WR 1

Observations: Phillips and Bozeman did not play the entire way. With the game in hand late,

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Frontier Nursing University Receives INSIGHT Into Diversity Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award

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2020 Marks the Third Consecutive Year that FNU Receives HEED Award

Versailles, KY, Oct. 05, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Frontier Nursing University (FNU) received the 2020 Health Professions Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity-focused publication in higher education. This is the third consecutive year that FNU has received this prestigious award. 

As a recipient of the annual Health Professions HEED Award — a national honor recognizing U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion — FNU will be featured, along with 45 other recipients, in the December 2020 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. 

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees — and best practices for both — continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for institutions where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being done every day across their campus.”

“Being selected as a recipient of the prestigious HEED Award for a third consecutive year is an incredible honor for Frontier Nursing University,” said FNU President Dr. Susan Stone. “Amidst the current social justice movement in our country, it is imperative that FNU serve as an agent for change. We know that culturally competent care improves health outcomes and begins with a more diverse healthcare system. We are proud to be taking a leadership role in this movement by educating an increasingly diverse student body, but fully recognize that we have much to

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Des Moines leader Nancy Mwirotsi receives $10,000 grant for STEM work

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Special to the Register
Published 5:34 a.m. CT Oct. 2, 2020

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Athletes from Ames, Hoover, North and Roosevelt speak before the DMPS March for Fairness.

Des Moines Register

Nancy Mwirotsi, founder of Pursuit of Innovation 515 (Pi515) in Des Moines, has been awarded a $10,000 Nation of Neighbors grant from Royal Neighbors of America, one of the first and largest women-led insurers in the country.

Mwirotsi is known in the area for her advocacy work on behalf of underserved women, refugees, and low-income students, the press release announcing the award stated. She will use the grant to expand her Girls Entrepreneurial Summit program that focuses on educating young women on business basics including planning, financials, marketing, and digital promotion.

“I am shocked and quite honored to have received this grant,” Mwirotsi said in the release. “It’s such a blessing to be recognized for your work.”

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Nancy Mwirotsi, founder and executive director of Pi515, speaks on Sept. 14, 2020 at Edmunds Elementary School in Des Moines. Attending speakers disapproved the model of 100% virtual instruction, instead advocating a hybrid model to better assist students with learning disabilities, language barriers, and less access to technology at home. Mwirotsi recently received a $10,000 grant for her work with Pi515. (Photo: Olivia Sun/The Register)

Pi515’s mission is to help create an inclusive culture for underserved women to learn STEM and provide them with the employment skills needed to launch them into new planes of achievement.

“Pi515 is taking on the inequity in STEM-related careers by directly addressing the pipeline. Each year, we embrace 100 students, particularly girls, from diverse backgrounds,” Mwirotsi said. “We introduce them to teachers and companies with employees who look like them, and provide role models that inspire them. We provide – at no cost – essential skills