West

0

College football rankings: LSU, Mississippi State losses see SEC West teams tumble in CBS Sports 76

Posted on

graphic-lsumsu76.jpg
CBS Sports graphic

One of my favorite parts about the month of October in college football is how quickly the rankings adjust to those initial reactions from the opening weeks of the season. In “normal” seasons this, would still be the point where teams have finally have a couple conference games in the books and whatever kind of overreaction we made from the few September results worth noting has been put to the test by the grind of league play. 

Even in a “normal” year, this is the point where we identify an early-season result that has been proven to be wildly misleading. In 2020, that game is Mississippi State’s 44-34 win at LSU. The biggest game on the SEC’s opening-week schedule had everything fans could want, from the intrigue of seeing how the defending champs would replace Joe Burrow and more than a dozen starters to the SEC debut of Mike Leach. By the time K.J. Costello and the Bulldogs (who entered the game as 18-point underdogs) were done carving up LSU for 623 passing yards in the upset win, a new era was proclaimed in the conference. Mike Leach was here, we thought, and the league would never be the same. 

Well, while we did see scoreboard-breaking totals in the SEC this past weekend, none of it came from Mississippi State. The Bulldogs did not even score an offensive point in a 14-2 loss to Kentucky, a result that was preceded by a 21-14 loss to Arkansas. Ever since the Leach era started with lighting up LSU, Costello has thrown the ball 114 times and the Mississippi State offense has scored just two touchdowns.   

Now at 1-2, Mississippi State finds itself at the bottom of the SEC West standings with LSU. That same LSU team that started in

0

The West Intends Energy Suicide: Will It Succeed?

Posted on

Suicide is viewed as a crime in many countries. In a court of law, it is a serious charge and the evidence needs to be conclusive for such an accusation to stand (e.g., did you actually see him attempt to jump off the bridge?). But when societies (or at least their leaders) attempt it, one can say that it safely falls under the rubric of the sovereign right to misrule. In the hallowed tradition of Western liberal democracy, so long as its political leaders are elected in free and fair elections, misrule leading to societal death by suicide is merely an unfortunate outcome of either gross negligence or culpable intention led by, say, a death-cult ideology. Nevertheless, let us proceed with the case for the prosecution.

The Circumstantial Evidence Of Societal Suicide

The first piece of evidence is an astonishing article published last week in the Boston Review by a professor of anthropology in Rutgers University . The good professor opined that Zimbabwe and Puerto Rico “provide models for what we might call ‘pause-full’ electricity”. The West, he continues, has created a vast infrastructure for generating and consuming electricity 24/7, 365 days a year. Since this is based on “planet-destroying fossil fuels and nuclear power”, we need to emulate the aforementioned poor countries and save the climate by giving up the demand for the constant supply of electricity.

To be fair, the professor also noted that the Zimbabweans and Puerto Ricans did not choose to accept electricity rationing but were imposed upon by the gross negligence and corruption of their governments. The professor cannot be lightly dismissed, and the Boston Review shares its domicile with MIT and Harvard University, the temples of wisdom in modern Western civilization. And the Review has its share of kudos, at least for those of

0

West Chester University To Stay Remote Into Spring Semester

Posted on

WEST CHESTER, PA — West Chester University officials announced today that spring semester classes will continue with remote instruction, a move they say is precautionary with a view to a predicted second wave of the coronavirus.

“With the nation continuing to experience spikes in COVID-19 and scientists predicting a new surge due to cold weather, West Chester University is taking extra precautions to protect the community from a forecasted second wave of the virus by continuing remote and some hybrid (meaning both remote and in-person) academic instruction through the spring semester,” the university said in a media release Wednesday morning.

The university made the announcement this week in order to allow students and their families to plan as they soon being selecting their spring semester courses.

“Continuing remote instruction through spring 2021 will ensure that WCU students will be able to earn credits for academic degrees in an uninterrupted manner,” said West Chester University President Christopher Fiorentino.

“There is not enough information on the availability of rapid testing or a vaccine on a sufficient scale for us to be confident enough to announce and plan for a spring semester that includes a return to in-person instruction,” he added.

The university said it will continue to provide COVID-19 relief credits to both in-state and out-of-state students, full-time and part-time, for spring 2021, which will lower the total combined costs of tuition and fees.

Spring 2021 instruction will be delivered via Zoom Conferencing, Skype, email, and a variety of other remote modes of course delivery as determined by WCU faculty, much like it was delivered in fall. Some courses will continue to be offered in a hybrid format (both remote and in-person) to assist students with clinical placements, student teaching, performance obligations, internship sites, and similar academic responsibilities.

“Universities across the State

0

COVID-19 and wildfire smoke put twindemic pressure on California, West Coast college students

Posted on

Fall weekends in Berkeley, California, have passed in a more subdued manner than years past.

How controlled fires have helped prevent mega-fires for centuries

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Where throngs of college students once partied raucously, sororities and fraternities now are dark and quiet. Around the University of California’s campus, it’s clear school is underway. But where is everyone?

Most students have been staying inside – for weeks.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Like much of California, Berkeley students have faced overlapping crises that have limited options for learning, socializing and carrying out everyday life.

First, it was the coronavirus. The university scrapped its plan for a hybrid of in-person and online courses this fall when COVID-19 cases mushroomed in mid-July. Many students moved home. Those who stayed found pandemic restrictions in place on everything from large gatherings to indoor dining. 

Then, the fires came. California is battling the worst fire season in recorded history. Smoke has blanketed much of the state for weeks. 

That means physical exertion outside is not recommended, and prolonged exposure can lead to headaches, sore throats and worse. Weeks after thick smoke first sent Californians inside, fires have sparked again across California. The taste of smoke comes and goes, and at times, San Francisco is barely visible across the Bay.  

COVID-19, hurricanes, wildfires: 2020 is an American nightmare that’s wearing us out

Online classes have made the whole experience more isolating, UC Berkeley third-year undergraduate Katie Lyon told USA TODAY. Lyon, co-president of the Cal Hiking and Outdoors Society, has found it hard to practice self-care while staring at a screen all day, which is why she usually hikes “every opportunity that I get between my academic schedule.”

That’s become more difficult this

0

West Des Moines school employee dies of coronavirus

Posted on

CLOSE

Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds laid out guidance for how public health officials will respond when students or school staff suspect they might have the coronavirus.

Des Moines Register

A special-education assistant at Indian Hills Junior High School in West Des Moines has died from complications of COVID-19.

The district announced Jennifer Crawford’s death in an email Monday. She was 53. 

“I am deeply saddened to share with you that our friend and classroom assistant, Jennifer Crawford, died today from complications of COVID-19,” Indian Hills Junior High School Principal Dr. Shane Christensen wrote.

West Des Moines Community School District spokesperson Laine Mendenhall-Buck said it was unclear when or how Crawford contracted the virus. She said Crawford had not been at work for several weeks.

“Due to community spread we cannot confirm how it was contracted,” Mendenhall-Buck said via email Monday night. “She was out of state when she fell ill.”

Mendenhall-Buck said in a statement Tuesday that Crawford had worked at Indian Hills since 2017 and has two children who graduated from West Des Moines Community Schools. She said the district will be sharing funeral information to Indian Hills staff and families once arrangements have been made. 

School board president Liz Cox said the board does not plan to have a conversation about transitioning to a different learning model following Crawford’s death. West Des Moines’ current return to learn plan allowed families to choose between either online or on-site learning at the beginning of the year.

Cox said her thoughts and prayers are with Crawford’s family. 

“The Board of Education shares in the sorrow when a student, staff, or parent dies; it is deeply felt throughout our district and community,” she said in an email.

To support those grieving, Cox said Indian Hills had two counselors and a representative from

1 2